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Other => CPU/GPU Bitcoin mining hardware => Topic started by: Detritus on July 17, 2011, 07:53:39 PM



Title: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 17, 2011, 07:53:39 PM
How to build an Open Frame Case  - Detritus style
http://www.stomped.me/pics/100_0253.JPG

Parts
two(2)  8 foot lengths of 3/4" square aluminum tubing for connectors. (Source Brunner Enterprises (http://www.brunnerent.com/Tools/Portfolio/frontend/item.asp?type=2&size=0&lngDisplay=2&jPageNumber=14&strMetaTag=))
six(6)   3 - Way Corner Connector (Source Brunner Enterprises (http://www.brunnerent.com/Tools/Portfolio/frontend/item.asp?type=2&size=0&lngDisplay=2&jPageNumber=6&strMetaTag=))
two(2)  3-Way Flat Connector (Source Brunner Enterprises (http://www.brunnerent.com/Tools/Portfolio/frontend/item.asp?type=2&size=0&lngDisplay=2&jPageNumber=7&strMetaTag=))
two(2)    2-Way Corner Connector (Source Brunner Enterprises (http://www.brunnerent.com/Tools/Portfolio/frontend/item.asp?type=2&size=0&lngDisplay=2&jPageNumber=3&strMetaTag=))

One(1)  Motherboard mounting panel  - Harvested from an old mini/mid tower case.

Tools
Dremel type rotary tool with metal cutting wheels - (used for cutting down motherboard panel - use a metal cutting band saw if you have one)
Hack Saw - (Used for cutting aluminum tubing - use a power miter saw or band saw instead if available)
Philips Screwdriver
Hammer
Power Drill and bits
A dozen or so  6-32 computer case screws - You probably have a jar full, or get some from amazon or ebay, or a local computer shop
Marking pen/pencil
Center punch


Construction

Step 1 - Harvest your motherboard mounting panel.
Generic mini and mid tower cases work best for this. Stay away from brand name computer manufacturers such as Dell or Gateway, they often use non standard standoff placement and will not work well for our needs.

The optimal cases are ones that use a single metal (steel) panel, with no large open ventilation/cable guild holes, and that mount the PSU on the top of the case.

This is a prime example of the type mounting panel you want...
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0271.JPG

You may have to remove multiple screws, drill out rivets, and cut the case down in order to get it down to this state. Basically remove everything that isn't this basic steel panel.

I had to cut away large areas of the case to get it down to this configuration..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0264.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0266.JPG
Make sure to remove any burs or jagged cuts..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0268.JPG

Step 2 - Cut your tubing to length.

(These measurements make a rack with a final width of 19.5", if you want your case to fit into a 19" equipment rack shelf cut the width of the main runners from 18" to 17.5" inches, and trim your motherboard panel to fit. )

Cutting the tubing with a hacksaw works well. So does an abrasive wheel in a miter saw. The abrasive wheels tend to make rough cuts that need to be cleaned up. The best cuts are from dedicated aluminum cutting blades for a miter saw or band saw such as this...  Aluminum blade (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&safe=off&q=dewalt+metal+cutting+aluminum+6%22&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&biw=1542&bih=1017&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=14357506367919526842&sa=X&ei=ly0jTpetA--JsALCyqG8Aw&ved=0CB8Q8wIwAQ)

Use your hack saw, miter saw or other tool to cut the tubing into the following lengths...

Four(4)   18" length (width) main runners.
Four(4)   9" length (depth)  
Two(2)   8" length (height) card mount risers.
Two(2)   4 3/4" length (height) lower card support standoffs.
Two(2)   2 1/2" length (height) upper card support standoffs.

http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0309.JPG

Make sure to remove any burs created during cutting..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0276.JPG


Step 3 - Assemble the lower frame square

Using Two(2)   18", Two(2)   9" tubing pieces and Four(4)  3 - way corner connectors assemble the lower square box so it looks like this..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0279.JPG

The connectors are easily inserted into the aluminum tubing by pounding them into place with a hammer. It's difficult, but not impossible, to remove the connectors from the tubing so try to get it right the first time.
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0277.JPG

Step 4 - Fitting and trimming your motherboard mounting panel

This step will be a little different for all builds because no two of the panels we harvested will be identical. The goal is to create a panel that covers the whole lower square, without overhang.
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0286.JPG

Most of you will find that the corners need to be notched out with your dremel to make it fit...
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0281.JPG

Then place the panel on the square frame, and mark the excess to be cut away and trim it off...
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0283.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0284.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0285.JPG


Step 5 - Assemble the upright supports
Assemble the rest of the metal frame.
Use the 8" support pieces with a 3 way "tee" on the front side (the side the cards screw to with their mounting plates.)
Use the 4 3/4" support pieces on the lower rear with a 3 way "tee" on the back side.
Finish up with two more 9" depth pieces, the two 90 degree corners, and the two 2 1/2" upper support pieces.

http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0288.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0289.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0290.JPG
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0291.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0292.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0294.JPG

Step 5 - Drilling/tapping the card support mounting holes.
I wanted to do this with a proper drill and tap, but the place I ordered my tap from sent me the wrong size. I didn't want to wait, so I worked around it.
Steel screws will easily cut/deform threads into the relatively soft aluminum. You can drill a proper size hole, just big enough for the screw to fit into, and force it in, and the steel screw will cut good threads into the aluminum than can be re-used many times.  I ended up using an oddball 7/64" drill size, because it was what came in my craptastic home tool kit. Use whatever you have, as long as the drill is not so wide that the threads will pass through the whole without touching. It is still a good idea to practice this on a peace of scrap aluminum.

http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0296.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0297.JPG
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0298.JPG

http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0299.JPG


I made a marking guide for marking the mounting screws out of the top part of the card mount from my old case. Basicly I just cut away everything from the top edge of the card mount..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0306.JPG

Use the guide to mark the holes to drill for the card mount. I find it best to put a card in the far right position and use a marker to mark the hole spots, and then continue working my left with the hole guide, marking as I go.
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0307.JPG
After marking, use a center punch to make an indentation in the aluminum so your drill doesn't wander, and then drill out the holes, and thread them with a screw.
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0308.JPG

Step 6 - Screwing down the mounting panel and creating a power supply mount.

I find that three screws along the front edge and three along the back edge are plenty to hold the plate securely. Use the same drill / screw tap method as before..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0300.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0302.JPG

The power supply mount. I really can't guide you much here. No two have been alike for me, and all are dependent on any support rails on the mounting panel, and the configuration of the power supply mount from your case. The idea here is to cut out a usable bracket from the cases power supply mount and screw it to the frame as the new PSU bracket on your frame. Here are some pictures on ones I've made, but your imagination will have to fill in the rest for yourself..
http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0304.JPG http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/100_0305.JPG
http://www.stomped.me/pics/100_0248.JPG




Suppliers and Source material
The aluminum tubing and connectors were purchased from http://www.brunnerent.com/ (http://www.brunnerent.com/) - There may be cheaper suppliers but for a no hassle, nice shopping cart order system, this is the pace to go.
The power supply is a Corsair AX1200
The motherboard is a 890AFX-GD70
The riser cables are cablesaurus brand. http://www.cablesaurus.com/ (http://www.cablesaurus.com/)
The power meter is a Belkin Conserve Insight. http://www.amazon.com/Belkin-Conserve-Insight-F7C005q-Energy-Use/dp/B003P2UMP8 (http://www.amazon.com/Belkin-Conserve-Insight-F7C005q-Energy-Use/dp/B003P2UMP8)

All the original images from this guide and some random other crap are available here.. http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/ (http://www.stomped.me/pics/case/)

Estimated costs
There is a lot of cost in the S&H here, if you can bundle orders together it makes  significant savings.

Code:
Preview Cart
 
Item Description Price/Unit Quantity Total Price
----------------------- --------------- --------------- ---------------
3/4 in Square Tube for Connectors
Stock#: S122R

3/4" Square Tube w/ .054" wall
Satin Anodized
8 ft.
$22.16 2 $44.32


3-Way Flat Connector
Stock#: PF32

3-Way Nylon Flat Connector for either 1" or 3/4" Square Tubing.
Black
3/4 in.
$2.42 2 $4.84



2-Way Corner Connector
Stock#: PF21

2-Way Nylon Corner Connector for either 1" or 3/4" Square Tubing.
Black
3/4 in.
$2.41 2 $4.82



3-Way Corner Connector
Stock#: PF33

3-Way Nylon Corner Connector for either 1" or 3/4" Square Tubing.
Black
3/4 in.
$2.42 6 $14.52


Sub Total: $68.50
S&H: $30.53

Grand Total: $99.03

That's it!
If you found this guild useful, please consider donating - 1D48JXC8hMZGVwwjNVvJJVgJ2H4svzvgyG
Questions and comments welcome.
Don't be a douche and copy this and claim it as your own.

Thanks!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 17, 2011, 09:06:31 PM
Are those 5970s?

Did you get all 10 gpus recognized and mining?

If so Linux or Windows?

TIA!
They are 5870's, so single GPU cards.

I'm running linux.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Dusty on July 17, 2011, 09:35:31 PM
Awesome, thanks for all the infos.

But I would like to know more about the extensions used for the VGAs: what are they and where they could be bought?

Thanks!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 17, 2011, 09:39:03 PM
Awesome, thanks for all the infos.

But I would like to know more about the extensions used for the VGAs: what are they and where they could be bought?

Thanks!

Those are the x16 PCI-e risers sold by cablesaurus... https://cablesaurus.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=9


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: macharborguy on July 17, 2011, 09:42:23 PM
have you tested a one of the Cablesaurus x1->x16 cables?  really interested in how those ones specifically work out.

thanks for posting this.  printing it out right now :)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 17, 2011, 09:57:52 PM
have you tested a one of the Cablesaurus x1->x16 cables?  really interested in how those ones specifically work out.

I have not, but I would be interested in hearing others experiences. The word of mouth I've heard on them is that they can sometimes be difficult to make work.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: faille on July 17, 2011, 11:55:23 PM
The parts link don't seem to show prices at first glance. Could you list them in the page to give a ballpark figure of what it would look like to put this together?

Would love to make one myself, but don't have any of the tools 8(



Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 18, 2011, 01:33:33 AM
The parts link don't seem to show prices at first glance. Could you list them in the page to give a ballpark figure of what it would look like to put this together?

Would love to make one myself, but don't have any of the tools 8(



Updated: Includes price dump from thier shopping cart.
WARNING: Old version had the wrong number of 90 elbow connectors listed as six, this has been corrected to the proper number ... Two.

If I make kits available the only tools you'd need are a hammer and a screw driver.



Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: naturallaw on July 18, 2011, 02:01:29 AM
If I make kits available the only tools you'd need are a hammer and a screw driver.

I might be interested, contingent upon price of course :)

BTW, this is super badass, great job!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: macharborguy on July 18, 2011, 02:05:03 AM
If I make kits available the only tools you'd need are a hammer and a screw driver.

I might be interested, contingent upon price of course :)

BTW, this is super badass, great job!

Add me as a second interested party.  Would the kit include the motherboard mounting plate, or would we have to do that ourselves?  I know you can buy plates online at various sites for cheap.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: deslok on July 18, 2011, 02:13:52 AM
I approve of the model M in the pictures i have several myself (including a few i unsuccessfully tried to sell over in the goods section) they are the standard all modern keyboards pale in comparison to.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 18, 2011, 02:56:38 AM
If I make kits available the only tools you'd need are a hammer and a screw driver.

I might be interested, contingent upon price of course :)

BTW, this is super badass, great job!

Add me as a second interested party.  Would the kit include the motherboard mounting plate, or would we have to do that ourselves?  I know you can buy plates online at various sites for cheap.

I'd rather not modify a bunch of different motherboard types, and have to matching each one to threaded holes in the chasis, so I'm talking with some local sheet metal shops about making up some specifically for the case. If I can get a good price this would be the way to go, because they would all be the same, and designed spefically for our use and have better plate mounting and a real power supply mount.

If that doesn't pan out I'm talking to some recycling outfits in the area the seen interested in processing the computer waste they get and selling me the plates and a price not a lot higher than what they get for scrap.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: macharborguy on July 18, 2011, 03:19:43 AM
cant wait :)

if any kits are ready before Winter hits here in Northern Michigan, i'll definitely be getting one.  Plan to stick it in a back storage room that gets just as cold inside as it does outside.  I just hope I can get a good wifi setup on it so it doesn't lose connection.  No real way to run a network line over to it, so i'll just have to make due with whatever speed i can muster via Wifi.

I did a quick test with my iPad and on my 18Down/2Up cable connection and a 2.4GHz N Wifi network, the iPad was able to connect and get about 512K down and up to a Chicago IL server.  A better antenna set up will help for sure, as well as better overall placement in general.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Threshold on July 18, 2011, 03:20:30 AM
Good post.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: hugolp on July 18, 2011, 05:34:31 AM
have you tested a one of the Cablesaurus x1->x16 cables?  really interested in how those ones specifically work out.

thanks for posting this.  printing it out right now :)

I have, the version with the molex to get the energy directly from the psu. I have two 5870 running with those cables. Not a problem, no reduction of speed.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: haploid23 on July 18, 2011, 03:19:34 PM
hey this is an awesome guide. it would have saved me a lot of time, although material does cost a little more than what i started building. i used a bunch of aluminum angled (L) bars to make the frame, and rivets to hold them together. not completely finished yet because my dog just chewed the drill's power cord in half, so i can't continue until i get a replacement drill  >:(

have you tested a one of the Cablesaurus x1->x16 cables?  really interested in how those ones specifically work out.

if i remember correctly, i think when using the x1 pci-e extension cable, i had to short the two presence pins together on each of the pci-e slots for my MSI 890FX-GD70. i think it's easier to just use a x16 cable


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Niann on July 18, 2011, 07:18:16 PM
Cheers mate.

Thank you very much for the awesome guide.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: exahash on July 18, 2011, 07:45:12 PM
have you tested a one of the Cablesaurus x1->x16 cables?  really interested in how those ones specifically work out.

thanks for posting this.  printing it out right now :)

I am using 20 of the Cablesaurus x1 -> x16 adapters with no problems https://cablesaurus.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=10

I had bought a few of the x1 -> x1 type and found modding them too much of a pain, so when I ramped up I went with the pre-modded ones.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: macharborguy on July 19, 2011, 06:21:02 AM
I was about to ask where the mounting area for the hard drive was, but then I realized you could just plug in a USB Flash Drive and use that as your boot drive with a linux-bitcoin distro.

Or, if it is supported, possibly a USB3 flash drive.  Not sure of actually real world usage, but some of the reviews I have seen possibly put it at least on par with PATA drives (according to Wikipedia, PATA can do up to 133 MegaBytes/sec.  USB3 apparently can do 640 MegaBytes/sec, plenty of room to breath).


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 19, 2011, 06:25:24 AM
I was about to ask where the mounting area for the hard drive was, but then I realized you could just plug in a USB Flash Drive and use that as your boot drive with a linux-bitcoin distro.

Or, if it is supported, possibly a USB3 flash drive.  Not sure of actually real world usage, but some of the reviews I have seen possibly put it at least on par with PATA drives (according to Wikipedia, PATA can do up to 133 MegaBytes/sec.  USB3 apparently can do 640 MegaBytes/sec, plenty of room to breath).

Yeah, it could defiantly use a HDD mount. One could be added pretty easily, especially if you can harvest a 3.5" mounting frame from the mini tower case.

I don't bother because I boot my rigs off a 32GB compact flash in a SATA bridge. The system see's it as a 32GB SATA drive.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: macharborguy on July 19, 2011, 06:28:25 AM
I was about to ask where the mounting area for the hard drive was, but then I realized you could just plug in a USB Flash Drive and use that as your boot drive with a linux-bitcoin distro.

Or, if it is supported, possibly a USB3 flash drive.  Not sure of actually real world usage, but some of the reviews I have seen possibly put it at least on par with PATA drives (according to Wikipedia, PATA can do up to 133 MegaBytes/sec.  USB3 apparently can do 640 MegaBytes/sec, plenty of room to breath).

Yeah, it could defiantly use a HDD mount. One could be added pretty easily, especially if you can harvest a 3.5" mounting frame from the mini tower case.

I don't bother because I boot my rigs off a 32GB compact flash in a SATA bridge. The system see's it as a 32GB SATA drive.


Nice.  is it sad that the first and only Compact Flash card I have every owned, and still have, is an 8 MegaByte one?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: NetTecture on July 19, 2011, 09:49:21 AM
Another alternativei s not to have ANY disc in a rig. I am setting up a larger operation, and we will need to have 2 control servers locally anyway... it is quite trivial to install a ISCSI target on those and then implement a network boot that chains forward to an ISCSI drive per rig. The result are discless rigs. Network performacne is not really tricky also - after booting quite nothing happens on the rigs anyway, in regard to disc.

This seriously also helps in regards to scaling up and getting another 16 computers into the grid ;)

If you are really nice you use a ZFS based host for LUNs.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 19, 2011, 08:11:08 PM
Another alternativei s not to have ANY disc in a rig. I am setting up a larger operation, and we will need to have 2 control servers locally anyway... it is quite trivial to install a ISCSI target on those and then implement a network boot that chains forward to an ISCSI drive per rig. The result are discless rigs. Network performacne is not really tricky also - after booting quite nothing happens on the rigs anyway, in regard to disc.

This seriously also helps in regards to scaling up and getting another 16 computers into the grid ;)

If you are really nice you use a ZFS based host for LUNs.
If I was running more than my three boxes I would definitely think about PXE booting them and running disk less.  It makes all the rigs interchangeable and cheaper.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Sukrim on July 22, 2011, 03:34:20 PM
Next step: Building 1-2 of these in a Ikea LACK table for added stackability + 19" compatibility! :)

http://wiki.eth-0.nl/index.php/LackRack


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: marvinmartian on July 24, 2011, 04:23:46 PM
Nice job.  Only minor critique is that you've got the GPUs pretty close together.  Why not space them farther apart to allow more airflow?  You can also angle them differently to catch air from something like a box fan, if you're dedicating a room in your house for tech that is.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Detritus on July 24, 2011, 09:49:36 PM
Nice job.  Only minor critique is that you've got the GPUs pretty close together.  Why not space them farther apart to allow more airflow?  You can also angle them differently to catch air from something like a box fan, if you're dedicating a room in your house for tech that is.

The spacing is the standard slot spacing on a motherboard. So it's card, blank slot, card, ect.

All the cards run between 59C and 74C. The 6970's (four of those on the top row) run hotter (in the mid to upper 60's) My 5870's (everything else) all run between  59C and 64C. So they seem to be getting good air flow.

Even when the outside temp's get into the 90F+ range the cards still stay decently cool.

I would space them further, but between leaving space for additional cards, and the limits of the riser lengths, that was the best I could come up with.

The motherboard plates all have the motherboard mounted all the way to the right (facing the PSU and motherboard connectors) which makes the riser cable in slot one a bit short to reach. I modified one of the plates to mount the motherboard further left, and it's a big improvement.

I'm talking to sheet metal shops about getting custom mounting plates made. Two of the design features being added are a standardized PSU mounting area and bracket, and moving the motherboard as close to the PSU as possible. For the power supply mount I'm going to have rails to keep the PSU from walking left/right, a more robust mounting bracket on the PSU face, and an adjustable Velcro strap to hold down the aft end of the supply.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: catfish on July 30, 2011, 02:21:29 PM
Excellent guide, thanks very much!

I've built one out of wood (had it lying around, and it's nice to do some woodwork now and again, it's a nice incongruity against the high technology mounted inside... though probably not ideal if the GPUs catch fire, but neither is the plastic most cases are made from...).

One thing I had a problem with, which you clearly didn't (since your GPUs are all the same) - you can secure each GPU to the front bar with screws, but this leaves the entire weight of the GPU hanging on this flimsy pressed steel bracket, which is often connected to the GPU circuit board only via one small screw and the stand-offs attached to the DVI plugs (!!!). You put a second ally bar at the back of the frame to support the rear of the card, which is required.

However if all your cards are different lengths, as mine are, it can be a little bit more tricky and require trial and error to find a position for a crossbar that will support ALL the cards satisfactorily. This isn't a criticism whatsoever, just an observation for those considering building their own, or buying a ready-made one from you.

Given the aggro I had making the wooden one, I'd happily pay you to build me one, but you're on the other side of the pond and the shipping costs would take a while to pay back!!! Equally, I don't have three identical cards (it's built for 5, only 4 installed but only 3 working :'( right now)...


Interestingly, even in stupidly hot ambient temperatures, with NO case / chassis / logic board fans other than the original CPU cooler and the onboard GPU coolers, the open frame rigs can run bitcoin mining at sensible temperatures (70˚C or below) without any other cooling!!!! I have a single small desk fan (7" plastic clip-on thing) blowing at the back of the cards, just for safety, but compared to being in even an *expensive* 'gamer' case... much, much better.

All I need now is easily openable (to mess with parts, press buttons, etc.) plastic mesh to cover the frame. Inquisitive cats and open computer cases don't mix ;)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: marvinmartian on August 01, 2011, 01:29:28 PM
All I need now is easily openable (to mess with parts, press buttons, etc.) plastic mesh to cover the frame. Inquisitive cats and open computer cases don't mix ;)

We have two cats with very different personalities.  One (male) is very vocal and ready to be pet / rubbed / played with  24hrs a day.  The other (female) is a bit more elusive and requires more specific coaxing to be cuddly.

Ironically, she LOVES hanging out in the basement now.  Never goes near the rigs but I think likes all the hot/warm/cool air currents created by the machines and fans.  Either that or there's some kind of strange animal EM attraction.

While I'm on the subject, has anyone else noticed an increase in moth population seemingly related to BTC mining?  I do.  They seem to be everywhere, but I notice a slight population increase (eg., 2 to 5) as I get closer to the basement stairs / mining rigs.  There are also many more moths in the basement, hiding in places where the breeze won't blow them around.

I wonder if moths can see parts of the EM spectrum that we can't and love microchips running at high speed / temp.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: botnet on August 01, 2011, 08:10:44 PM
I barrowed from your design and made some improvements
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: marvinmartian on August 01, 2011, 08:55:10 PM
I barrowed from your design and made some improvements
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw)

Nice job, especially on getting the PCI -> PCI x16 adapters working.  I've read many posts about folks having trouble with them.  What MOBO are you using?

Gotta say, I am really liking the wooden rigs.  Who knows, maybe the mild conductivity of the wood helps minimize grounding damage.  I'm not an EE, I'm a SE.

We all gotta start doing SteamPunk Bitcoin Mining Rigs (SBMRs).  Then BTCs will hit the big time.  ;-)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W1GKJlqg98k/Tgh05cb_wSI/AAAAAAAAACo/F35L1Fwql5c/s1600/bitcoin_mining_pc.jpg (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W1GKJlqg98k/Tgh05cb_wSI/AAAAAAAAACo/F35L1Fwql5c/s1600/bitcoin_mining_pc.jpg)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: catfish on August 01, 2011, 08:56:32 PM
All I need now is easily openable (to mess with parts, press buttons, etc.) plastic mesh to cover the frame. Inquisitive cats and open computer cases don't mix ;)

We have two cats with very different personalities.  One (male) is very vocal and ready to be pet / rubbed / played with  24hrs a day.  The other (female) is a bit more elusive and requires more specific coaxing to be cuddly.

Ironically, she LOVES hanging out in the basement now.  Never goes near the rigs but I think likes all the hot/warm/cool air currents created by the machines and fans.  Either that or there's some kind of strange animal EM attraction.

While I'm on the subject, has anyone else noticed an increase in moth population seemingly related to BTC mining?  I do.  They seem to be everywhere, but I notice a slight population increase (eg., 2 to 5) as I get closer to the basement stairs / mining rigs.  There are also many more moths in the basement, hiding in places where the breeze won't blow them around.

I wonder if moths can see parts of the EM spectrum that we can't and love microchips running at high speed / temp.
Our two cats are similar in temperament to how you describe. They are brother and sister - she is a right little madam and he's a cuddly gentle giant (he's a baby still - just over 18 months old - but well over 6 kg and bony as hell... hopefully when he fills out he'll be like his dad, who was around 15 kg).

That said, even Edie is over 5 kg. Firstly, I wouldn't want their characteristically HUGE tails to get caught in the monster fans, but secondly, a playful swipe could easily slap a GPU out of a board, or pull an extender cable out, or (more likely) rip out the ethernet cable and play with it as if it was the tail of some hapless rat.

In some respects it's safer that they're a large breed - small cats could get *into* the open frame rig, I'm not sure Ozymandias would be able to, maybe Edie could. But that open frame rig isn't going anywhere near where the cats can get in *until* I've replaced ALL network connections with USB wireless dongles and meshed-up the wooden frames. I've got a separate cheap 802.11g router specifically for this - bitcoin *mining* doesn't use vast amounts of network bandwidth, and there's no need to waste real money on gigabit switches and routers and running cable everywhere.

I reckon simple 802.11b/g (i.e. 2.4 GHz) on each box hidden inside the box using USB extenders, with the USB dongle poking out the top so the antenna sends signals somewhere sensible. Then a router / range extender with a decent-gain antenna (I've got a load of kit from my WiFi hacking days... ooops ;) ) picks up the mining boxes on a special VLAN and routes out to the internet.

At the moment I'm wasting a gigabit switch I desperately need... may as well do all of this on wireless, no?

My main Bitcoin *client* is on gigabit, of course.


And as to the moths - well I *have* seen a few moths around. But I reckon it's the time of year, and they don't last long with the cats around...

OK - here's a display of execrable carpentry skills :) The next one (if there is a next one!) will be MUCH better built... however there's something satisfying about building stuff with wood... not sure that the logic board and components NEED earthing other than through the cables and ground rails (any EEs care to inform me whether I'm being dangerous here?)...
http://www.catfsh.com/bitcoin/wood-frame-rig/front.jpg

http://www.catfsh.com/bitcoin/wood-frame-rig/side.jpg

Yes, it's a mess, but it's built to take 5 dual-slot cards, the two single-slot 5770s are due to be replaced with dual-slot 5830s soon. The question remains over the logic board - and whether it actually *works* or not with all PCIe slots used up... but if not, I'll look into the PCI -> PCIe adapters...


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: pennytrader on August 02, 2011, 04:27:09 AM
I barrowed from your design and made some improvements
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ru5Mz9Xqw)

This is the best rig I've ever seen! Great job!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: dishwara on August 02, 2011, 05:02:45 AM
Thanks for the wooden case. It gave me idea to use just a wooden reaper on top of slotted angle in the cards back side, so that instead of using some wires or threads to secure cards, i can just buy a wooden reaper of 24 inch x 1 inch x 1 inch & bolt it on top of slotted angle & can screw the cards where ever i want easily.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=33468.msg418401#msg418401


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: afro25 on August 02, 2011, 02:12:46 PM
Can i just ask what everyone uses to turn the rigs on when you're using an open frame system?
As far as i'm aware i can't turn my rigs on without a front panel being connected, so would i have to harvest the front panel of one of my computers to build an open frame rig?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cicada on August 02, 2011, 02:50:37 PM
Can i just ask what everyone uses to turn the rigs on when you're using an open frame system?
As far as i'm aware i can't turn my rigs on without a front panel being connected, so would i have to harvest the front panel of one of my computers to build an open frame rig?

It's usually not too difficult to do if you've got an old case you can cannibalize.  You really only need the power switch.  You can also just pick up a momentary DC switch from RadioShack or such and wire the two leads to the power-button header, as that's all your power button really is.  It boils down to simply tripping the solenoid in your PSU to 'on'.



Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: dishwara on August 02, 2011, 04:45:16 PM
My mother board comes with a switch to power on & reset in mother board itself. MSI Big Bang Marshal.
Also, in bios setup, power management i applied to power on the machine after power restore. So if power cuts & comes back, system automatically starts.
If that doesn't happen then i use screw driver to short the power + & - pins to start the system.
If you don't know about hardware, you can buy a switch & connect it to power + & - & use that to switch on the system.
Better safe than sorry. Avoid screw type method i did, if you don't know about hardware.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cicada on August 02, 2011, 04:56:14 PM
My mother board comes with a switch to power on & reset in mother board itself.

I think this is becoming a common feature on newer motherboard, my ASRock mobos also have reset, power, and 'clear cmos' buttons built onto the board.  This is how I turn my rigs on without a case.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: catfish on August 03, 2011, 01:27:39 AM
Can i just ask what everyone uses to turn the rigs on when you're using an open frame system?
As far as i'm aware i can't turn my rigs on without a front panel being connected, so would i have to harvest the front panel of one of my computers to build an open frame rig?
We've got a shop called Maplin in the UK that sells random components and technology gadgets (I guess the USA equivalent would be Radio Shack - we used to have Radio Shack here in the UK when I was a kid, long gone now though...) and I simply bought one of their 'motherboard testing packs'.

This is an overpriced plastic packet with a speaker on a three-pin-wide jumper, a red power LED on a two-pin-wide jumper, a green HD activity LED on a two-pin-wide jumper, and two press-button switches on two-pin-wide jumpers labelled 'reset' and 'power on/off'.

Instead of fitting a header to the 'Front Panel' pins on the logic board, one has to attach each individual test jumper. All you need to make the logic board work is the Power On/Off jumper, but when you've got an entire pack for a particular logic board you're using, I always fit the whole lot. Mainly because the system speaker is sometimes used to indicate problems with GPUs etc. and it's worth knowing if the logic board doesn't like a particular GPU...

Apologies - these are hidden in the back corner of my wooden frame rig and not visible in the photos. I'm building a U-section aluminium frame next with some wood (aesthetics matter! These bitcoin rigs are being outnumbered heavily by my 11 Apple Macs and being *seriously* laughed at by fancy aluminium and glass... I'm pursuing the 'low-cost bitcoin miner design Jonathan Ive would come up with'... of course, thinking that *I* could get anywhere *near* Teh Jon's other-worldly industrial design is a massive insult to him, but he gives me inspiration!!!) and I'll have to do something better than a Maplin 'mobo test kit' jumper set... ;)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: jpinconline on August 03, 2011, 08:23:17 AM
I would also be interested in a kit ;D this is very cool


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: dishwara on August 03, 2011, 08:32:18 AM
Some power switch links.
http://www.amazon.com/Power-Motherboard-Cable-Switch-Button/dp/B00345WH4A
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=power+switch+for+pc&hl=en&prmd=ivns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&biw=1600&bih=809&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=10997433530487650282&sa=X&ei=uAY5To61DabTiAKAkazHDg&ved=0CKABEPMCMAQ4Cg
http://compare.ebay.com/like/160551466715?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=y
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812201029&nm_mc=OTC-Froogle&cm_mmc=OTC-Froogle-_-Cables-_-APEVIA+CORP.-_-12201029
http://www.shophde.com/z18.html


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: eskamobob1 on August 04, 2011, 09:31:32 PM
if you do make a kit i would be interested :) would the extenders be included? also, what size PSU did u use to run that many 5870s? im sure i could run like 6 or 7 on mine, but im curious what kind of wattage you could get away with for 5  :)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: mrbashfo on August 14, 2011, 05:08:51 AM
great! has lots of info but I am too lazy to try it myself LOL... Maybe I will do one out of 1x1 wood =p


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: naturallaw on August 15, 2011, 04:43:44 PM
Detritus, are you still looking into putting together some kits?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: deslok on August 21, 2011, 02:04:52 AM
I too am interested if kits will be avilable


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Mr.Coin on August 25, 2011, 02:19:45 AM
If you cant find motherboard trays for cheep, just grind off the part of the brass screw that screws into the tray.  Then all you have to do is screw them on the motherboard and glue them to the metal tray.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: The LT on August 25, 2011, 05:37:42 PM
Nice keyboard you got there... Nice...


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: AssemblY on August 28, 2011, 02:10:54 AM
Very good! I will try to make a equal to its.  ;)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cablepair on September 27, 2011, 01:15:54 PM
thats slick man, excellent work.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: hmongotaku on September 28, 2011, 07:08:24 PM
nice guide but i'll stick to a case. Main reason is it's portable and for 99 dollars I can get a decent case for another 50 bucks. Those 8 dollar pci-e extension cable ain't cheap either. I'll problably think about it when I magically hit the lottery. Good guide tho! 1+


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Transisto on October 15, 2011, 03:44:12 AM
No guide needed for this !
http://i.imgur.com/ABXeXl.jpg (http://imgur.com/ABXeX)

2 board, 8-10 GPU

Cost, : 5$, or trash wood.
Time : 20min
Part availability : real common

Ps : Please remove sticky


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: dishwara on October 15, 2011, 07:46:45 PM
Can u post with all cards, mother board, cpu attached & mining with pictures?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: d.james on October 17, 2011, 06:28:38 PM
This looks like a perfect weekend project for me.
As the price dips I finally have excuses to take some of my rigs offline.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Transisto on October 19, 2011, 12:18:50 AM
Can u post with all cards, mother board, cpu attached & mining with pictures?
http://i.imgur.com/z2pqz.jpg


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: tinman951 on October 20, 2011, 01:53:10 AM

Suppliers and Source material
The aluminum tubing and connectors were purchased from http://www.brunnerent.com/ (http://www.brunnerent.com/) - There may be cheaper suppliers but for a no hassle, nice shopping cart order system, this is the pace to go.
The power supply is a Corsair AX1200
The motherboard is a 890AFX-GD70
The riser cables are cablesaurus brand. http://www.cablesaurus.com/ (http://www.cablesaurus.com/)


Any other suggestions of motherboards that can run 4+ gpus?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: catfish on October 20, 2011, 10:31:58 AM
Any other suggestions of motherboards that can run 4+ gpus?
Gigabyte GA-H61M-D2-B3. Needs an Intel CPU so more expensive than some AMD solutions. But in the UK, the logic board is 60 new, and the cheapest CPU (2.6 GHz dual-core Sandybridge thingie) is around 63.

I've got three of these in the shelf rig, each running four GPUs (5x 5830, 3x 5850, 4x 6950, all overclocked).

If the value of the BTC starts to making mining profitable again then my next rig will be another one of these boards.

Also, you may want to look over here (https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=48992.0) (points to this forum, BTW)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: rjk on January 17, 2012, 05:42:29 PM
Protip: Do not try using a pneumatic hammer for assembling these. I tried it, and my wrist is going to ache for a week now. Going back to my trusty old shot-filled hammer. This is what I was using:
http://www.trimlok.com/secure/Content/ImagesProducts/20f6e3f9-5ab7-4547-bdd0-ad0e066f456c.jpg
It kind of worked, but was slow and ineffective. Also it sprayed oil everywhere  >:(


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: jamesg on January 17, 2012, 05:47:58 PM
Protip: Do not try using a pneumatic hammer for assembling these. I tried it, and my wrist is going to ache for a week now. Going back to my trusty old shot-filled hammer. This is what I was using:
http://www.trimlok.com/secure/Content/ImagesProducts/20f6e3f9-5ab7-4547-bdd0-ad0e066f456c.jpg
It kind of worked, but was slow and ineffective. Also it sprayed oil everywhere  >:(

You made me lulz.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Frizz23 on January 21, 2012, 05:14:07 PM
Hi,

how are those cables called that "extend" the PCIe bus (the cables that connect the PCIe slots with the graphics cards).

I didn't know there's such a thing!

cheers,
F.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Crypt_Current on February 03, 2012, 12:28:18 AM
Hi,

how are those cables called that "extend" the PCIe bus (the cables that connect the PCIe slots with the graphics cards).

I didn't know there's such a thing!

cheers,
F.

I googled "pci-e extender" and got this:
http://www.amazon.com/PCI-Express-Riser-Flexible-Cable/dp/B004XD74MC

and also this:
http://www.amazon.com/HOTER-Extension-Cable-Riser-Adapter/dp/B0057M1ZLE


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: trouserless on February 04, 2012, 07:25:39 PM
Hi,

how are those cables called that "extend" the PCIe bus (the cables that connect the PCIe slots with the graphics cards).

I didn't know there's such a thing!

cheers,
F.

I googled "pci-e extender" and got this:
http://www.amazon.com/PCI-Express-Riser-Flexible-Cable/dp/B004XD74MC

and also this:
http://www.amazon.com/HOTER-Extension-Cable-Riser-Adapter/dp/B0057M1ZLE

everyone seems to swear by Cablesaurus (http://cablesaurus.com/), so I bought a few from them and they work fine.  If you search through the forums there are some cases of cheap PCIe extenders frying/burning up.  Their prices seem fair enough and their shipping is quick. 


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cypherdoc on February 05, 2012, 03:55:08 AM
Hi,

how are those cables called that "extend" the PCIe bus (the cables that connect the PCIe slots with the graphics cards).

I didn't know there's such a thing!

cheers,
F.

I googled "pci-e extender" and got this:
http://www.amazon.com/PCI-Express-Riser-Flexible-Cable/dp/B004XD74MC

and also this:
http://www.amazon.com/HOTER-Extension-Cable-Riser-Adapter/dp/B0057M1ZLE

everyone seems to swear by Cablesaurus (http://cablesaurus.com/), so I bought a few from them and they work fine.  If you search through the forums there are some cases of cheap PCIe extenders frying/burning up.  Their prices seem fair enough and their shipping is quick. 

do they diminish the power to the card?  i see that some come with molex connectors.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: tinman951 on February 06, 2012, 04:21:33 AM
do they diminish the power to the card?  i see that some come with molex connectors.

Not the card, but they protect the mother board from "blowing a fuse" because of too much power draw.  For instance if you have 4+ 7970s on one mobo you are drawing a great deal of power directly from the mother board.  The molex connector can give you power directly from the power supply; then only a little power actually comes from the mobo, only the data.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: rjk on February 06, 2012, 04:24:52 AM
do they diminish the power to the card?  i see that some come with molex connectors.

Not the card, but they protect the mother board from "blowing a fuse" because of too much power draw.  For instance if you have 4+ 7970s on one mobo you are drawing a great deal of power directly from the mother board.  The molex connector can give you power directly from the power supply; then only a little power actually comes from the mobo, only the data.
The very thin wires in the extenders do cause a bit more current to flow because of their added resistance. Rule of thumb is any and all dual-gpu cards with extenders should have molexes as well, and single gpu cards should be OK without them. However, the 7970 is a beast that needs more power, so it might be a good idea to have molexes, especially if you plan on overclocking.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Joshwaa on February 07, 2012, 04:39:59 PM
Let me know if you start selling a kit. I am interested!! Have BTC burning a hole in my digital back pocket!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: DeathAndTaxes on February 07, 2012, 05:13:50 PM
The very thin wires in the extenders do cause a bit more current to flow because of their added resistance. Rule of thumb is any and all dual-gpu cards with extenders should have molexes as well, and single gpu cards should be OK without them. However, the 7970 is a beast that needs more power, so it might be a good idea to have molexes, especially if you plan on overclocking.

Actually the exact opposite is true.  The PCIe spec limits current on the slot to 75W but most high end cards (those with 8pin PCIe power connectors) draw much less.  I measured wattage at ~30W for a 5970 across the extender.  A 5870 draws ~30W too.

A 26 gauge wire can safely handle 2.2 amps of current.
A 30 gauge wire can safely handle 0.8 amps of current.

75W / 4 wires / 12V = 1.56A per wire.
30W / 4 wires / 12V = 0.625A per wire.

@ 30 gauge, 1 foot, 0.625A the voltage drop is 0.132V which is within ATX spec.

Personally I would stick w/ 26 gauge wiring and max length of 0.5 feet but even longer thinner wires should be fine.


So why is a single card worse?
          5970          5870
4 GPU  60W total   120W total
6 GPU  90W total   180W total
8 GPU 120W total   240W total

The issue isn't the extender but the aggregate draw on the MB.  To be compliant a PCIe 1x device must draw <25W and a PCIe 16x device which identifies it self as high current drawless than 75W.  All devices must draw less than 10W until interrogated by PCIe controller (at boot).

It really comes down to how aggressive MB designer was in power distribution.  Take a board with 4 PCIe x16 slots & 1 PCIe x1 slot.  By the spec the MB should be able to have 325W worth of compliant devices however to save money the design may assume that only 200W or 150W or only 100W will be drawn from the PCIe bus.  The higher the load the higher the risk you bump into the corners cut by MB supplier.

Granted the shouldn't cut corners but the number of users who pull 300W+ across the PCIe bus are in a rounding error and beefy power distribution is expensive for a low margin product.

It gets worse when using a board with lots of PCIe 1x slots.  The more PCIe 1x slots less power the designer may anticipate as a realistic scenario as PCIe 1x slots can only draw <25W and many (SATA controllers, USB3.0, sound cards, etc) draw <10W.  (This is why the presence detect pin needs to be shorted on some boards for stability).

Sadly a lot of boards are non-compliant and available power across PCIe bus isn't a stat provided.  This makes it hard to predict how much of a load the board can handle safely and efficiently. 

As a rule of thumb I would be more concerned about overloading the board when:
1) Using more than 4 SLOTS (# of GPUs doesn't matter).
2) The board has less PCIe 16x slots and more PCIe 1x slots.
3) The board only has a 4 pin 12V connector not the higher current 8 pin 12V connector indicating a possible design choice in power handling.
4) The board is more of a budget model (not crossfire certified, etc).


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cypherdoc on February 07, 2012, 05:22:23 PM
do they diminish the power to the card?  i see that some come with molex connectors.

Not the card, but they protect the mother board from "blowing a fuse" because of too much power draw.  For instance if you have 4+ 7970s on one mobo you are drawing a great deal of power directly from the mother board.  The molex connector can give you power directly from the power supply; then only a little power actually comes from the mobo, only the data.
The very thin wires in the extenders do cause a bit more current to flow because of their added resistance. Rule of thumb is any and all dual-gpu cards with extenders should have molexes as well, and single gpu cards should be OK without them. However, the 7970 is a beast that needs more power, so it might be a good idea to have molexes, especially if you plan on overclocking.

is a 6970 a "dual gpu" card?  how do i tell?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: DeathAndTaxes on February 07, 2012, 05:29:32 PM
is a 6970 a "dual gpu" card?  how do i tell?

No.  You can tell by checking it in the OS (aticonfig, catalyst control center, device manager).  Dual GPU cards show up as 2 independent GPUs.

The 5970, 6990, and 7990 are dual GPUs.  So is the 4870x2 but nobody mines with that.

And yes AMD changing the naming scheme makes things confusing. :)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: rjk on February 07, 2012, 05:31:16 PM
The very thin wires in the extenders do cause a bit more current to flow because of their added resistance. Rule of thumb is any and all dual-gpu cards with extenders should have molexes as well, and single gpu cards should be OK without them. However, the 7970 is a beast that needs more power, so it might be a good idea to have molexes, especially if you plan on overclocking.

Actually the exact opposite is true.  The PCIe spec limits current on the slot to 75W but most high end cards (those with 8pin PCIe power connectors) draw much less.  I measured wattage at ~30W for a 5970 across the extender.  A 5870 draws ~30W too.

So why is a single card worse?
          5970          5870
4 GPU  60W total   120W total
6 GPU  90W total   180W total
8 GPU 120W total   240W total


To be compliant a PCIe 1x device must draw <25W and a PCIe 16x device which identifies it self as high current drawless than 75W.  All devices must draw less than 10W until interrogated by PCIe controller (at boot).

It really comes down to how aggressive MB designer was in power distribution.  Take a board with 4 PCIe x16 slots & 1 PCIe x1 slot.  By the spec that could draw 325W however to save money the design may assume that only 200W will be drawn from the PCIe bus.  If designed for 200W then either configuration would be fine up to 6 GPU but the 8 GPU 5970 setup is 20% overspec.  If they cut corners and design the power distribution to handle 150W safely well you likely are going to cause damage to the board if using more than 5 cards.

Granted the shouldn't cut corners but the number of users who pull 300W+ across the PCIe bus are in a rounding error and beefy power distribution is expensive.

It gets worse when using PCIe 1x slots.  The more PCIe 1x slots less power the designer may anticipate as a realistic scenario as PCIe 1x slots should draw <25W and many (SATA controllers, USB3.0, sound cards, etc) draw <10W.

Sadly lots of boards are non-compliant and available power across PCIe bus isn't a stat provided to it is hard to predict but as a rule of thumb I would be more cocerned about overloading the board when:
1) Using more than 4 SLOTS (# of GPUs doesn't matter).
2) The board has less PCIe 16x slots and more PCIe 1x slots.
3) The board only has a 4 pin 12V connector not the higher current 8 pin 12V connector.
4) The board is more of a budget model (not crossfire certified, etc).
Oho, interesting. So do 16x slots have additional power available? I thought all the power was in the 1x section, or at least that is how all the extenders that I have seen have ever been soldered. 5870s drawing more than 5970s? WTF. Maybe I need more powered molexes, or maybe I should just switch to 5970s ;)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: DeathAndTaxes on February 07, 2012, 05:56:49 PM
Oho, interesting. So do 16x slots have additional power available? I thought all the power was in the 1x section, or at least that is how all the extenders that I have seen have ever been soldered.

All the power is actually is not in the  1x lane section.  There is a common section which handles various low level functions including power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCIe#Pinout

Pins 1-11 <- system interface (includes all power)
- notch -
Pins 12 - 18  <- Clock & Data Lane 0
- notch -
Pins 19 - 22  <- Data Lane 1
Pins 23 - 28  <- Data Lane 2
...
Pins 85 - 88  <- Data Lane 15

PCIe x1 slot - data lane #0 used.
PCIe x4 slot - data lane #0 to #3 used.
PCIe x8 slot - data lane #0 to #7 used.
PCIe x16 slot - data lane #0 to #15 used.

If you cover pins 19 to 88 on a Graphics card with electrical tape and insert it into a 16x slot the computer will see it as a 1x device.

The PCIe spec works like this (simplified):
At boot device must draw less than 10W from the bus.
Once interrogated by the controller any low-current device can draw up to 25W.
If the device identifies itself as high current it can draw up to 75W once interrogated by the controller (only PCIe 16x device are authorized).

On supplemental power connectors.  Device can draw 75W from a 6 pin or 8 pin connector.  Device must gound-sense pin #8 on 8 pin and detect a ground before drawing 150W.  If the device doesn't detect ground on pin 8 it must limit current to 75W. Yes this means if you connect pin #8 to the ground you could pull 150W from a 6 pin connector but if PSU can't handle it (in terms of amps on the rail) bad things will happen.  The PCIe 6pin connector can handle 150W just fine.  Technically it can handle 300W.  The extra pins on 8 pin connector aren't used for current.  They are just used for backwards compatibility.

Quote
5870s drawing more than 5970s? WTF. Maybe I need more powered molexes, or maybe I should just switch to 5970s
Remember that is just from the expansion slot.  Same number of slots ~= same power draw.  The 5970 simply uses half the number of slots putting less of a load on the PCIe bus (but more of a load on the PCIe 6/8 pin power connectors).


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Joshwaa on February 07, 2012, 06:02:29 PM
do they diminish the power to the card?  i see that some come with molex connectors.

Not the card, but they protect the mother board from "blowing a fuse" because of too much power draw.  For instance if you have 4+ 7970s on one mobo you are drawing a great deal of power directly from the mother board.  The molex connector can give you power directly from the power supply; then only a little power actually comes from the mobo, only the data.
The very thin wires in the extenders do cause a bit more current to flow because of their added resistance. Rule of thumb is any and all dual-gpu cards with extenders should have molexes as well, and single gpu cards should be OK without them. However, the 7970 is a beast that needs more power, so it might be a good idea to have molexes, especially if you plan on overclocking.

is a 6970 a "dual gpu" card?  how do i tell?

6970 is a single GPU card.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: trouserless on February 12, 2012, 08:28:08 PM
Started hastily with a lego rig that grew to this:

http://www.temple.net/btc/lego-last-small.jpg

When I needed to cool the cards better (run the fans at a lower speed, spread out cards), I found some scrap wood and my trusty nail-gun and the result exceeded my usual "just enough" approach...

http://www.temple.net/btc/wood-both-angle-small.jpg

(the 5830 will be hooked up when the cablesaurus shipment arrives)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: BTC guy on February 20, 2012, 05:04:32 AM
nice work


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: zvs on April 11, 2012, 12:04:11 PM
hmm, is that keyboard an IBM Model M 1391401?  or just a newer copy of one?

Back about 10 yrs ago, I bought half a dozen of 'em new in box off of eBay for ~$120 (all w/ 1989 manufacture date)

and I'm on my 2nd as of now...


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Beaflag VonRathburg on April 18, 2012, 03:20:34 AM
hmm, is that keyboard an IBM Model M 1391401?  or just a newer copy of one?

Back about 10 yrs ago, I bought half a dozen of 'em new in box off of eBay for ~$120 (all w/ 1989 manufacture date)

and I'm on my 2nd as of now...

I have an old circa 94 IBM keyboard that I used to use for my mining rigs. I love it and it just won't die. This is an old picture, but I think this is the only one I have of it. http://i43.tinypic.com/4sl076.jpg


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: ARapalo on April 26, 2012, 04:29:45 AM
I love the creativity of that lego setup. Although, one karate chop and the structure blows up haha.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Transisto on June 29, 2012, 06:51:50 AM
Funny how OP full size pictures make it's post 27mb.


Warning, building such GPU rigs at this time ? ; I suggest you consider their future profitability before investing time and $ into it.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: add1ct3dd on May 01, 2013, 06:09:52 PM
Here's mine:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/920787_10152772778015557_1179644448_o.jpg

Made from inch thick aluminium, with a removeable mobo tray and a PCI rack from an old server :)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: wildbud on May 01, 2013, 06:53:57 PM
Started hastily with a lego rig that grew to this:

http://www.temple.net/btc/lego-last-small.jpg

When I needed to cool the cards better (run the fans at a lower speed, spread out cards), I found some scrap wood and my trusty nail-gun and the result exceeded my usual "just enough" approach...

http://www.temple.net/btc/wood-both-angle-small.jpg

(the 5830 will be hooked up when the cablesaurus shipment arrives)

Does the wood work fine?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Suave on May 24, 2013, 02:50:58 AM
Props to the OP!!  ;D Thanks so much my friend! Here's what I managed to put together.

http://i40.tinypic.com/308dusp.jpg

http://i40.tinypic.com/21otthl.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/258xc2p.jpg


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: drlukacs on May 24, 2013, 05:34:18 AM
Looks very nice!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: zif33rs on May 24, 2013, 03:16:41 PM
 8)

I should have got the grey connectors.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/zif33/20130523_093918.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/zif33/media/20130523_093918.jpg.html)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: BabylonDown on December 05, 2013, 07:32:47 AM
Anyone know where I can find the 3-way connectors in Canada?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: AceCobra1 on December 25, 2013, 09:27:15 PM
http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/zxcvbrna/m.html?item=201008369246&pt=US_World_Coins&hash=item2ecd084e5e&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

I hope the picture is used with permission ;-)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: AceCobra1 on December 25, 2013, 09:28:52 PM
by the way, what is the is minimum and what is the ideal distance between the GPUs for best cooling. I am thinking around 4 to 5cm..

And do I ONLY need to drill a hole and the screw should be able to screw itself in or should I buy a proper screw tapper ?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: rudyo on December 26, 2013, 06:01:53 AM
What is the consensus on card orientation - horizontal vs vertical?

I haven't been able to find a good discussion that comes to any conclusion.  I get that most GPU fans suck air in and push it across the fins over processor and out the back through the mount plate evtns (where the DVI plug is) but this setup is for a sealed case.  In this traditional setup, having the cards vertical an allowing the heat to rise up and out may be a benefit.

It seems we upset the normal flow when we put an additional fan blowing between the cards, so does this negate the card placement? has anyone has better results horizontal or vertical?



Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: hakeriukasx on January 11, 2014, 11:54:07 AM
two(2)  8 foot lengths of 3/4" square aluminum tubing for connectors, I dont understand inch and feet and etc ,8 foot= 2.5m?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: dannymack on January 14, 2014, 10:19:49 PM
Thanks for the directions.

So, I used your sizes (a bit modified) and I even used Brunner ...the supplier you linked to. What I did differently was give them the sizes I needed and they cut it for me...only .69 cents a cut.

I also decided to use a regular case for the bottom..was just easier to fit everything in and comes with power buttons and all..only cost me $39 (X-Dreamer3) ...As such, I had to make it higher...but those numbers above allowed me to figure out the height for the cards.

A problem with my way was...it's now two separate pieces and difficult (but not impossible) to move.

Here's what it looks like:

https://imgur.com/a/uKm87


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: G K G on January 15, 2014, 03:06:14 AM
8)

I should have got the grey connectors.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/zif33/20130523_093918.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/zif33/media/20130523_093918.jpg.html)

Nice setup. What do you use to boot the OS? lan boot or you use a HDD?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Eternity on January 15, 2014, 09:59:03 AM
Awesome lots of info am too lazy to try that on my own :D


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: predatorkill on January 18, 2014, 01:37:36 PM
Here's my rig, 1x6970, 2x6950 and 1x7970 hashing at 2.1MH/s. I ve made it from iron parts and not alluminium and i use 2 psu's, one bronze for mobo and 2x6950 and the other is silver for 7970 and 6970. The dimensions are 25cm longer so it can fit the 2 psu.

Thanks for this wonderful guide, temperatures dropped 5 degrees celcious after 'moving' from a plastic crate to this. :D

check images below:

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d157/predatorkill1/IMG_1588_zps0d31257e.jpg (http://s35.photobucket.com/user/predatorkill1/media/IMG_1588_zps0d31257e.jpg.html)
..

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d157/predatorkill1/IMG_1590_zps82069b60.jpg (http://s35.photobucket.com/user/predatorkill1/media/IMG_1590_zps82069b60.jpg.html)
..
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d157/predatorkill1/IMG_1591_zps8386bc81.jpg (http://s35.photobucket.com/user/predatorkill1/media/IMG_1591_zps8386bc81.jpg.html)

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d157/predatorkill1/3k11_zpsc2e44141.png (http://s35.photobucket.com/user/predatorkill1/media/3k11_zpsc2e44141.png.html)
..
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d157/predatorkill1/IMG_1593_zps91a767bc.jpg (http://s35.photobucket.com/user/predatorkill1/media/IMG_1593_zps91a767bc.jpg.html)

in the last image you can see the green and black wire jumpers in order to connect the 2 psu together and power on at the same time with button press.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: BillGeo on January 20, 2014, 08:50:17 AM
Here's my rig, 1x6970, 2x6950 and 1x7970 hashing at 2.1MH/s. I ve made it from iron parts and not alluminium and i use 2 psu's, one bronze for mobo and 2x6950 and the other is silver for 7970 and 6970. The dimensions are 25cm longer so it can fit the 2 psu.


Very nice heavy and solid rig build patrida!!!  8)

I came here from insomnia.gr to see the pics!!!

APSOGOS!

 ::)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: IchibahnSLC on January 23, 2014, 02:17:02 AM
Anyone know if these connectors are available at home depot, lowes or ace hardware?


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Thyatis on January 23, 2014, 02:23:37 AM
i will pay someine to build me multiple of these pm me details


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: Thyatis on January 23, 2014, 02:26:23 AM
i will pay someine to build me multiple of these pm me details

just the rig no motherboard etc etc i have all that jut not wenought time to source parts and build it


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: prhvideos on January 23, 2014, 03:19:39 AM
This is an impressive rig, I am new to crypto currency and have been looking at a lot of builds and guides. Thanks for posting all this man, great for opening up the mind and some personal dream building ;P


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: grobbes on January 23, 2014, 04:22:56 AM
Finally built my first. Used a hacksaw and edges came out a little uneven but it still gets the job done :)

Thanks OP!

http://i39.tinypic.com/znkdqb.jpg


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: IchibahnSLC on January 23, 2014, 07:05:57 AM
Has no one bought any supplies locally for this? In the US that is.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: grobbes on January 23, 2014, 07:14:43 AM
Has no one bought any supplies locally for this? In the US that is.

This looks pretty exact: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-48-in-x-3-4-in-x-1-16-in-Aluminum-Square-Tube-40630/202183563

The corner connectors though.... not sure


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: IchibahnSLC on January 23, 2014, 07:19:33 AM
Has no one bought any supplies locally for this? In the US that is.

This looks pretty exact: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-48-in-x-3-4-in-x-1-16-in-Aluminum-Square-Tube-40630/202183563

The corner connectors though.... not sure

Yeah the connectors are my issue as well.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: grobbes on January 23, 2014, 07:22:29 AM
Has no one bought any supplies locally for this? In the US that is.

This looks pretty exact: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-48-in-x-3-4-in-x-1-16-in-Aluminum-Square-Tube-40630/202183563

The corner connectors though.... not sure

Yeah the connectors are my issue as well.

Brunner ships super fast even though the shipping/handling is a bit high (it was top notch though). I believe the cheapest shipping got everything to me in 2 days and the order processed the same day as ordering.

In the future though, I'd just grab the 4 ft tubings since the UPS guy had some fun getting the 8 foot ones into my apartment :)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: cad_cdn on January 25, 2014, 06:54:44 PM
thx for the guide!


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: SneakyNinjA on January 26, 2014, 07:32:13 PM
I made this out of wood for ~$5.00, so if you live near a lowes or home depot, you can just buy screws and 1x4's and you're set.

Does anyone have a PDF print out or link to a website that has the exact placement of the screwholes of the ATX mobo's? I had to take my mobo and use a sharpie before putting in the holes.


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: G K G on January 26, 2014, 08:50:19 PM
https://openrigs.com/

try these, better spaced


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: SneakyNinjA on January 26, 2014, 09:26:00 PM
Not sure if you noticed GKG, but no one has received their openrigs order. Not saying he's scamming, just that shipments from South Arica not only cost a lot, but take 2+ months... (longer than shipping EMS from China)


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: G K G on January 26, 2014, 09:36:03 PM
Not sure if you noticed GKG, but no one has received their openrigs order. Not saying he's scamming, just that shipments from South Arica not only cost a lot, but take 2+ months... (longer than shipping EMS from China)

oooh! sorry, didn't know

And also thank you. i was thinking of placing a order


Title: Re: GUIDE - Make your own open frame rig.
Post by: AvalonMiner on January 27, 2014, 12:20:09 AM
Thanks, this was very informative and helpful :)