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1  Economy / Services / Hedging A Real Estate Purchase With Crypto on: November 28, 2017, 06:41:29 PM
I was a broker (in a former life) and have been immersed in Bitcoin for over five years now. I believe I've come up with a way for buyers to protect themselves from a 2008 style collapse by using Bitcoin.

I'm not looking for any money at this time (donations would be accepted) but do need to get the idea and system tested. There are some potential mine fields (such as bank repercussions, civil legal disputes etc.) and the system adds yet another layer of complexity to an already complex real estate purchase but I think it would be worthwhile for all the parties (even the banks).

If someone had used my system five years ago and had put 10% down (in the form of Bitcoin) on a $200,000 property then the BITCOIN would be worth over 18 million dollars today. Rather than having a buyer sell their Bitcoin to use as a down payment, the Bitcoin is used as a security deposit and can continue to appreciate.

I've got a basic website started at BitcoinRealEstateHedge.co.

Feedback and discussion is what it's all about!


IF this system is used:

The buyer and seller essentially disintermediate the bank, the secondary mortgage market and the realtors from the equation.


Donations - seed money
1AZK3oWy6uGPShYjdPts4CzYvCUi3MH5ut
2  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Pros and Cons Of A Country Doing "Bitcoinization" on: February 18, 2017, 01:56:45 AM
I ran across this article http://www.investopedia.com/articles/04/082504.asp about the idea that a country abandon the local currency in favor of the exclusive use of the U.S. dollar (or another major international currency, such as the euro). They call it "dollarization" so why don't we add "bitcoinization" to the discussion?

It also talks about the idea of "pegging" their local currency to a major international currency (this differs from dollarization as it is non-exclusive use).

So, what if countries start using Bitcoin in either of these ways? There are many (hundreds) of countries, some too small to really develop "counterfeit" proof fiat paper currencies. And with the proliferation of cell phones, digital money is just more efficient so they would be able to leap frog over the whole fiat fiasco by going right to digital.

So what might countries experience if they did allow Bitcoin an equal playing field to compete with other currencies that their populations are already using? Especially the type/size country the article is talking about (smaller ones).


Read more: Dollarization Explained | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/articles/04/082504.asp#ixzz4YzsnBALH
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
3  Other / Off-topic / Re: How are you earning BTC? on: February 12, 2017, 05:16:50 PM
So as of this moment, I'm only earning bitcoin through a signature campaign here on bitcointalk forum.

How are you earning bitcoin?



I'm "trying" to earn Bitcoin by enabling others to earn Bitcoin too (through a cooperative ad network pooling web traffic to market it more efficiently).
4  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin and Network Marketing Companies on: January 26, 2017, 12:08:51 AM
Anyone who sees Bitcoin's popularity wants to make a profit from it. Network marketing is one of the sectors that wants to get this pastry share in the systems. Is it good to use bitcoin (crypto currency) by network marketing companies? How does this affect people's perspective on bitcoin?
For me MLM companies because you are refering to them probably, are like literally scam. They are always with little changes giving propaganda of success. You will be sucessfull, you will become rich, you will be great, you are great... just give us your money Wink. They taking money for books (for you to learn of course), for teaching courses (for you to become great of course) etc.

Stay away from companies like that, you will loose your time and money.

I pretty much agree. One little talked about issue is the difference between a pyramid company (totally illegal) and a MLM (perfectly legal).

Any guess as to what separates the two - legally?

Quote
just give us your money Wink. They taking money for books (for you to learn of course), for teaching courses (for you to become great of course) etc.

When a company earns more from the participants than it does from sales to customers it is approaching the line of becoming an illegal pyramid.

In other words, if the participants all earn their money by getting people in it rather than by actually selling product then they are in dangerous waters.

That's why mine is free. The only "investment" I ask for is that they invest the web traffic to their website (80% of the time they aren't selling it or trying to monetize it so it is usually already going to waste). And, very important is the fact that the only product we sell is one created by the members themselves



Could you give the name of the MLM company that you work for if it doesn't matter to you?

I don't consider it a "MLM" company but it uses a multi-level commission system to pay the participants based upon their production. The production is meaured in their sales of web advertising which they accomplish through installing our API on their website. Visitors (those with websites) are our only target market so we don't pay "per click" like other ad networks. If you make a sale you get a perpetual 50% of whatever that advertiser spends.

The above has nothing to do with MLM. It is a straight sales commission no different that real estate (my background), insurance, cars and a host of others. Where it starts to get "deep" is when you realize everyone that signs up for advertising also owns a website. With that now out in the open we certainly would like to get that advertiser to also add our API to their website as well. In other words, each sale results in yet another lead to grow the company.

So for all those that are somehow scared of MLM I offer them the opportunity to opt out of the next FREE payment level and abandon the commissions on the earnings of those we recruit. We'll keep it if they insist and laugh all the way to the bank as they think how they avoided being "scammed".

Bungeebones.com, Blog4bitcoin.club, blogsbystudents.com and blog4healthyliving.com are some of our introductory demos. Feel free to register at as many free blog sites as you like FOR FREE (I hate to kick a dead horse but, darn, how much more FREE shit you want). So while Wordpress.com tells the Bitcoin community to stick it by stopping to accept Bitcoin as payments, I offer the same blogs for free and provide a potential to earn Bitcoin and I get accused of being a scammer! I'm getting pretty damm sick of some of the dumbasses.

If you already have a Wordpress site you can get a plugin. Sign up, advertise your site for free, install the plugin and YOU MIGHT earn Bitcoin. Whether you do or not depends on how quick the other dumbasses realize this isn't a scam - some are a bit slow so it may take a while. But then again, Wordpress runs 25% of the websites on the internet and if they all installed this plugin to earn Bitcoin then Bitcoin would be on 25% of the Internet overnight.



5  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin and Network Marketing Companies on: January 25, 2017, 11:46:09 PM
Network marketing is a nice idea. Actually my friends and other residents in our province has known bitcoin through this networking using bitcoins as payment. If not because of this networking schemes bitcoin could not spread in my country very fast. If there will be more networking companies that will use bitcoin as mode of payment then surely bitcoin will be known worldwide.

I agree with you. I have worked for one of the network marketing companies in the past. After 5 years of the company entrance in my country, nearly everyone knows the company and knows something about that company. The use of bitcoin at the networking schemes is a good way for the profit and also for the awareness. Especially technology companies can do that easily.

I had to think long and hard about whether to use Network marketing in my Bitcoin-only ad network. Your posts bring up the "danger" flag of MLM which is what happens when "nearly everyone knows the company and knows something about that company.". I call that the market saturation point and the ones that get hurt are those that BUY into it at the end. And it was for that reason that I made my network marketing opportunity FREE. So when people start saying I'm out to steal because I use MLM I start to get just a bit pissed at the dumb asses.

The typical "pitch" of a MLM is that you need to pay or buy in because you are buying a business opportunity. While that is true, there is no guarantee of territory or limits on how many competitors there will be within your territory so there is absolutely no way to appraise the value of the opportunity. To those that buy at the peak, they overpaid as there is zero value for the so-called business opportunity because the market is saturated.

Looking at the buyin cost from a different angle will also tell how close the company is to being an illegal pyramid. If everyone in the company only makes their money by recruiting and getting people to "buy-in" then it is absolutely, positively a Ponzi scheme and an illegal (in the US) pyramid.

If, on the other hand, the MLM opportunity has no buy in free and is truly just an opportunity, and those that participate make 100% of their income only from sales (only if and/or when sales occur) then that is as far away from a pyramid as can possibly be set up.

If these dumbasses who spew "MLM" and "pyramid" and "Ponzi" in the same breath would only take a few minutes to actually study and investigate they might not open their foolish mouths so quickly.

Lastly, any company that wants or needs to grow quickly needs to plan some type of "customer acquisition cost". Another way to say that in the sales area is "recruitment" cost. If you don't pay your sales staff to recruit others they won't. If you pay them too much they will recruit too much as well (and saturate the market with starving salespeople). Of all people, Bitcoin people should understand using incentives to get proper behavior and to reward it.

The proper behavior, (in my mind), is to reward both the sales person and the recruiter but without using a "per-head" price. The correct payment trigger is quite obvious ... you pay the recruiter based upon the sales of the recruit. With that arrangement, MLM is MORE fair than any compensation system I have ever seen. It's better than employer/employee and many independent contractor ones.

It's easier to break eggs than to put them together so those that just want to bash MLM ought to start offering something better!
6  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Ask The IRS to define the dollar on: January 25, 2017, 08:31:20 PM
I don't really get what you are trying to point out here.
The dollar's value ...

You mean the fraudulent Federal Resrve Note here, don't you? Why do you have such a problem recognizing it as the worthess piece of shit it is? Does calling it after something that used to have legitimate value (and still does if you recognize it as the silver coin) make you feel better or more "American" or something? That's the danger, getting into WWIII just to protect thevalue of the worthless piece of shit it is. We already fought the Gulf wars to protect the FRN - how many more you willing to do? Nukes?

Quote
in other currencies, commodities and Bitcoin varies all the time. You will need a time stamp of the exchange rate at the time of buying Bitcoin and the time of selling bitcoin.


The difference in dollar value will be taxable.
My point exactly! The difference in value between the FRN and the real dollar is a factor of 20. So, go ahead and give them 20 times more taxes than they are legally entitled to and tell me about your mastery of the English language and semantics. I suggest you do some review of basic grammar and math yourself.

Quote
You can argue the semantics of the USD and if it has any value at all, but the IRS won't care. If you feel that it is worth arguing, I would suggest that you don't bring it up with them personally, unless they audit you!
Otherwise I think you might find that they suddenly want to audit you, and may not be too interested in your definition of the USDs value!

So it sounds like we agree that the IRS is indeed hiding behind a veil of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt). While i appreciate your encouragement for me to throw myself on the landmine, I'll pass. I would not wait to the point where I am being audited to bring this up with them (if at all). But if they are suddenly inundated with thousands of requests (any attorneys not afraid of the IRS?) to clarify the legal definition of a dollar so we can accurately determine the value of our earnings in LEGAL dollars (and not in worthless, piece of shit, IOU nothing but shit Federal Reserve kiss my ass NOTES) then we can get on with paying our lawfully owed taxes. Succumbing to the the IRS FUD just opens the doors to even more tyranny than we already have.
7  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin and Network Marketing Companies on: January 25, 2017, 08:11:23 PM
In fact, it is possible for someone who is successful in a good network marketing business to earn millions of dollars. But most people in MLM companies can not make money. Not all MLM companies are fraudulent. But most MLM companies use the ponzi system. MLM firms that use the ponzi system are fraudsters.
It doesn't matter if there is 1 of 10 MLM company which is legit. This whole market is filled with exploits and is based a controversial, pyramid-shaped marketing strategy.
Do we really need something like this associated with Bitcoin? In the end it will only build fake assertion that Bitcoin is good only for fraudulent schemes like MLM payments.

If you take a "pyramid" and turn it upside down you get a funnel. Bitcoin's problem now is that it is filled with a different kind of "fraudster" (i.e. the speculator).. I made out quite well as I bought in at $10 and lived off of it for over two years. But just getting a bunch a greedy "get rich quick" types getting into Bitcoin is just as much a "ponzi scheme" as there ever was.

What I've said from the beginning is that Bitcoin needs to enable the average person to get some which usually involves some way for them to earn it. Apart from changing all the employment tax laws, the insurances, the escrows etc. associated with "normal" employee arrangement Bitcoin's use to pay workers is doomed. No business is going to go through all that just to pay them with Bitcoin (unless they are making a ton of Bitcoin profits, then they would do that instead of converting to fiat).

So, while I appreciate all the anti-MLM sentiment, it is just a tool after all. So much of your scathing ridicule sounds very much like the ignorance that comes out against Bitcoin from people who know nothing about it but are "experts". MLM (not the illegal pyramid scheme -they ARE different) is a very legitimate way to accomplish what many Bitcoin enthusiasts at least claim they are in favor of (democratizing wealth). The greedy speculator Bitcoin user is not after that, of course, but MLM is a way for someone with little or no capital to get started in their own business. Certainly the failure rate is high but so isn't the failure rate in regular startups high. And, with MLM, you most often start with someone with little (if any) actual business experience or knowledge.

The advantage of the MLM arrangement to the organizer is the savings in cost of hiring all the sales and support staff and the speed and scale at which it can be launched. I see MLM as a way for Bitcoin companies to actually break free from the Central Banks. And MLM created properly and fairly is a contractual relationship. If the contract is clear (not like the DAO that lost 50 million of investor's money) then an MLM will compensate those that actually provide value to the organization a growing stake in the success. An added "natural fit" with Bitcoin is that much more of the MLM "contract" can now be encoded in smart contracts and it can enable the income opportunities globally. I think that is all a good thing.

Compare that to the "employee" serfdom that corporations now provide I would much rather have the freedom to achieve according to my work rather than bank on the fraudulent lies and greed of corporations. Trump is missing the real issue when he talks about bringing back "jobs". The truth is that corporations have not only stabbed their workers in the back, they have repeatedly twisted the knife around. All those corporations that he got to "stay" here are created for one purpose and one purpose only ... to make profits. They stay if they make more profits, and, they leave if that is where the profits are. So, go be an employee for those assholes all you want and whine against MLMs all you want, you're ignorant and don't know what the hell you are talking about. Period.
8  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: Looking for ideas for Bitcoin related site - I have capital on: January 18, 2017, 10:25:53 PM
I have plenty of capital, looking for a partner with a unique idea to develop. Open to any ideas that will slowly or quickly accumulate BTC.

Something other than faucet/exchange/dice site...

I started a thread here describing my Bitcoin-only startup.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1738377.0
The potential market are the sites without monetization systems (80%) w3techs.com/technologies/overview/advertising/all
Dual goals - provide them a better, more lucrative system to earn money from their web traffic
                  - teach and earn Bitcoin

Don't anticipate the need for too much capital but could use some to hire better programmers, offer beta testers "bounty" to test and prove concept.

Is 90% coded.

9  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Ask The IRS to define the dollar on: January 17, 2017, 10:13:45 PM
So, basically IRS forced the law (is is even possible to do something like that without wide consensus of other financial institutions?) that benefit the state (in terms of collecting more taxes from Bitcoin users) more.
I thought that US Treasury classified bitcoin as virtual currency in 2013, also bitcoin was categorized as  such by various courts - i.e. Texas US District Court.
Amazing how paper pushers can be so two-faced and label bitcoin as currency and commodity at the same time.


yes, but the IRS classified it totally different from the other branches of government. They declared it property (for tax purposes). What that ruling requires taxpayers to do is to report the value gained in the "dollars". The problem, as I see it, is that we (the US and others) don't use actual dollars, and they are, instead, actually Federal Reserve Notes. They were, at one time, promises to pay actual dollars but that is no longer true. In fact, they are no longer even notes, as they exist only in digital form in bank ledgers. So, since the IRS requires taxpayers to report their Bitcoin earnings in "dollars" they should be able to clarify this little point quite easily. Their actions indicate that a Federal Reserve Note somehow and someway became the very thing (i.e. a dollar) that it was promising to pay. Such an occurrence surely would be recorded clearly either in statute or case law. I don't believe the FRN ever became the dollar so we (taxpayers) need it to be clearly identified if we are to report our earnings based on that standard.

The term "dollar" is only used as a representative of United States' currency.
It is like saying the "Euro" or the "Pound". It is only a denomination now.

Originally, the "dollar" was backed by gold and silver with the US Treasury.
Later, I think under Nixon, the laws were changed to remove precious metals
fully and depend entirely on Fiat currency.
Now, the "dollar" is backed by assets and debts with the Federal Reserve.

Whatever the "dollars" backing was and is today, the IRS do not care.
They think that US Dollars are the same as Federal Reserve Notes.
If the law in certain areas uses the term "dollars" they will interpret as
"federally approved US currency" which is actually 'Federal Reserve Notes".
Otherwise, no US Citizens would be able to legally and literally pay their taxes
or other debts, since "true dollars" no longer exist or are in circulation.


You got it! "Otherwise, no US Citizens would be able to legally and literally pay their taxes
or other debts, since "true dollars" no longer exist or are in circulation.".

And if the words in laws have no meaning then there is no law. That is why every statute ever written ahs all the terms defined. So, just ask them that question and, rather than open that can of worms, they will quietly go away from Bitcoin. If they really press it, there is NO US Dollar and there hasn't been for a long time. The fraud of the Federal Reserve Note would  be out in the open. The more publicity they generate, the more people see "The Emperor has No Clothes".

But one very important correction regarding your statement  "Originally, the "dollar" was backed by gold and silver with the US Treasury.". The truth is that, originally, the dollar WAS  SILVER, not backed by it. That little twist of truth and meaning enabled them to slip the FRN in as being "the dollar" as it was what was backed by gold and silver. The dollar was silver, and legally is still the only dollar.
10  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Ask The IRS to define the dollar on: January 17, 2017, 05:05:37 PM
So, basically IRS forced the law (is is even possible to do something like that without wide consensus of other financial institutions?) that benefit the state (in terms of collecting more taxes from Bitcoin users) more.
I thought that US Treasury classified bitcoin as virtual currency in 2013, also bitcoin was categorized as  such by various courts - i.e. Texas US District Court.
Amazing how paper pushers can be so two-faced and label bitcoin as currency and commodity at the same time.


yes, but the IRS classified it totally different from the other branches of government. They declared it property (for tax purposes). What that ruling requires taxpayers to do is to report the value gained in the "dollars". The problem, as I see it, is that we (the US and others) don't use actual dollars, and they are, instead, actually Federal Reserve Notes. They were, at one time, promises to pay actual dollars but that is no longer true. In fact, they are no longer even notes, as they exist only in digital form in bank ledgers. So, since the IRS requires taxpayers to report their Bitcoin earnings in "dollars" they should be able to clarify this little point quite easily. Their actions indicate that a Federal Reserve Note somehow and someway became the very thing (i.e. a dollar) that it was promising to pay. Such an occurrence surely would be recorded clearly either in statute or case law. I don't believe the FRN ever became the dollar so we (taxpayers) need it to be clearly identified if we are to report our earnings based on that standard.
11  Economy / Service Announcements / Re: We've created a new Bitcoin Crowd Funding website - BitGrants.com on: January 16, 2017, 07:38:21 PM
Such a non-professional site..
I think you should take the time and make a better,more creative looking website.
Not sure if lenders will put money at the moment on this site.

Good luck with this in the future,wish u the best  Wink

We believe the site's functionality is the most important priority.  Adding snazz is also important, but what use is good looking website if UI doesn't work!?  We've spent the majority of our time making sure all our systems function securely, so users can invest with us and have peace of mind.   The UI is an evolving thing, as we progress I'm sure we'll see a few iterations in the overall design.

Thank you for your criticisms - They have been duly noted.

I agree that "the site's functionality is the most important priority". It's hard to top Google in the area of functionality but look at their home page - a single picture and a form input! Sometimes, simple is best.

I have a very different kind of crowdsourcing need that requires some "thinking outside the box". Maybe it might give you ideas ...Maybe you can help? I need and use web traffic as capital. I don't need capital in the form of cash, definitely don't want or need fiat capital but I might be able to use a little Bitcoin capital. But what I really need is web traffic from websites and I treat web traffic as money (and capital) and offer both short-term and long-term ROI on it..

As you, yourselves, are busy promoting and building, building and promoting on and on - people come to your website to check it out. And ... you don't currently monetize that. While most may think that "trickle" of web traffic isn't worth anything, I look at it as a source of capital IF AND WHEN it can be aggregated with a bunch of other web traffic (from other sites) into a larger, more marketable block. I do that, through this API, and now your site can sell that larger block to the visitors you do get. It is much easier to sell a large block of traffic than a little one.

Here's where the traffic turns into capital ... there is a chance (yes, investing is risky) you may never make a sale (and therefore never earn anything for your web traffic) BUT there is also a chance you may sell to a really good customer that buys lots of web advertising from the "block" for a long time. We built our commission system in such a way it pays you 50% of what they pay, perpetually, for as long as they continue to pay. The amount can even increase if, for example, the block of traffic gets larger and the buyer increases their purchases (i.e. it is always 50%).

Then, if that isn't a sweet enough deal (for what is very likely not a lot of traffic), then we'll add another commission layer that says if we can recruit that advertiser to also install the FREE API then you will get generous overrides on their sales too (after all, they found out about US because of YOU). And the chances are pretty good that we can recruit them and that they aren't selling their web traffic either

12  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Ask The IRS to define the dollar on: January 16, 2017, 07:05:39 PM
Yeah could you explain a little on IRS?

 Cheesy https://www.irs.gov/
13  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin in the classroom, yes or no and why? on: January 16, 2017, 07:03:33 PM
This is for a personal writing project I'm working on. I imagine that Bitcoin would be good for things like teaching things like math with decimals ("How many Satoshis do you need to get a tenth of a Bitcoin?", stuff like that), budgeting (Spend it on whatever you want, but when it's gone, it's gone), or even a little bit of IT / programming stuff like how cryptography works. What do you guys think of this?

In my opinion, most of the student in the classroom or in the school campus will not gonna be open minded about in bitcoin. Or in some instances bitcoin can be a hindrance to their study. I think it is much better for the students to focus their mind in studying n school not in bitcoin, unless if the student are open minded in opportunity like Bitcoin to anyone.
I disagree with you. Students love to learn about new things and there is no doubt that most of them will try to figure out what Bitcoin is if you ever teach them about it. I used to be a college student when I first heard about Bitcoin. Then, I smashed all the internet in order to find more and more information about Bitcoin. Trust me, they will like Bitcoin

Isn't the point of education to learn new things? I think limiting the curriculum to only subjects that students are "open minded" too would limit the curriculum to drugs, sex and rock n roll. "Been there, done that" and , it doesn't work :-)
14  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: Earn & Learn Bitcoin on: January 16, 2017, 06:49:42 PM
Great concept!  I have earned next to nothing over the years with the google ads or amazon affiliate program and have given up a few times even though I had many viewers and followers.  I would be interested in re-starting some of my blogs if I can earn bitcoin.  I am always looking for interesting ways to earn bitcoin!  One question - does my blog have to be about bitcoin or is it any type of content to participate?

Don't feel bad about earning nothing with Google or Amazon. This report shows more than 80% don't want to have anything to do with the current corporate business model. w3techs.com/technologies/overview/advertising/all

Personally, while the web advertising part of this idea looks great, I really think I'm onto something that will be great for Bitcoin too in the way I am building the business 'container'.

Bitcoin, to me, is just too awesome to 'pollute' by placing it into the "corporation" system. Bitcoin exists without state permission but corporations exist ONLY with state permission.

There is an ownership system that goes all the way back to Common Law known as a "trust". While it can share many characteristics of corporations, they are essentially contracts. So, connecting the dots between the idea of "smart contracts" (made possible by the blockchain and Bitcoin) and the "contract" side of trusts, I'm working on making the ownership container a trust whereby those that use the script are the beneficiaries of the trust. The trustee's responsibility is, then, to them and consists primarily of protecting and preserving the operation of the contract (within the code) for their benefit. As we learned with the DAO, there is extreme difficulty in coding "fairness" and "equity". The trust arrangement has centuries of legal precedents that provides that the trustee MUST always operate for the benefit of the beneficiaries. So, in our organization, if the trustee ever breaches that responsibility then the beneficiaries have well established legal remedies they can pursue.

So, in our trust, the trustee (or even a board of trustees) will be working for the benefit of those that contribute  (or invest) their traffic through the trust which is much different than the board of Google or Amazon who are required by law to work for the benefit of the stockholders. The website operator (in their model) is merely a customer to them. Yes, they need to be fair and honest but they don't have to provide ownership rights or long-term benefits like we are pursuing.

Let me know if you need help installing it or (I hope not) if you come across a bug. That's what I need the most help with right now. I need people to get their hands dirty installing it, talking to the friends about it, getting their friends to get a blog or install it etc. Hopefully it will become as easy a presentation to just say something like "Install this plugin and earn Bitcoin". I like to get into the weeds to explain it but it needs to be presented in an easy to understand way to help get Bitcoin into more people's hands.
15  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: Earn & Learn Bitcoin on: January 16, 2017, 06:13:05 PM
How to switch Bitcoin account to a blog? Is it really better than usual payment systems? I just launched a blog ( using http://www.templatemonster.com ), but still have many things to learn.

Hi Lisa,

I'm not understanding your question. You wouldn't switch a Bitcoin account to a blog? We use Bitcoin as the payment method and you would receive your Bitcoin commissions to your own wallet.

16  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin in the classroom, yes or no and why? on: January 15, 2017, 02:22:16 PM
This is for a personal writing project I'm working on. I imagine that Bitcoin would be good for things like teaching things like math with decimals ("How many Satoshis do you need to get a tenth of a Bitcoin?", stuff like that), budgeting (Spend it on whatever you want, but when it's gone, it's gone), or even a little bit of IT / programming stuff like how cryptography works. What do you guys think of this?
the goal in class is to teach something. if it is math, then you should teach math. if i count with apples or satoshis is not important, but the focus should be on learning math not on learning bitcoin.
Yeah I agree. You are meant to go to school so that you can learn life skills before you get a job and survive for yourself. Children definitely do get taught about currency and maybe when Bitcoin becomes a global currency, children will be taught about it.

[quote
Children definitely do get taught about currency
[/quote]

Yeah, first they get told that pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters are money. Then are told that a paper "dollar" is equal in value to 4 junk metal quarters. Once their brain is scrambled with that nonsense they are ready to be fed the lie that infinitely increasing accounting ledger entries in a bank's computer are equal in value to the paper dollars.

Then, once you get them that mentally retarded, you tell them that the government spent more than they could take in in taxes AND that the government could have digitally created (but didn't) so now they (government) had to go out and "borrow" some previously created digital accounting entries (while they were still minors and not voting) and now the children need to pay off that debt they inherited.

Also, since the kids are now in debt, what's a few more tens of thousands on top of that so borrow a ton of digitally created computer entries to get an "education" so you can get a good job (so you can pay off the debt).

I love the way they teach them currency.
17  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin in the classroom, yes or no and why? on: January 15, 2017, 03:35:02 AM
wouldn't replace currency since not many places accept it at this time.

GYFT.com accepts Bitcoin for gift cards to over two hundred companies.
Overstock.com
Dell Computer
Expedia


and ... mamy companies are offering Bitcoin backed debit cards because
1) Bitcoin has zero fraud
2) zero chargeback
3) Much lower transaction fees
4) zero default

Merchant acceptance is not now or going to be an issue. Bitcoin is money and businesses will accept money (that is what they are in business for, correct).

18  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Really no talk of segwit / big blocks.. on: January 15, 2017, 02:28:14 AM
If they cut the transaction time from 10 minutes to 5 minutes and kept the blocksize the same for the five minute transaction that would, effectively, double the total throughput.

It would also achieve confirmations in half the time.


Jump ahead ten years and ask if a ten minute transaction time will still work?

Why not, then, have options at every halving?

We already have scheduled halvings every four years so why not just have soft forks added at the same time to select transaction time, blocksize, or combinations of the two. The "halving" already has a certain degree of consternation but it is in the open and people prepare. Adding the decisions at the same time about blocksize would seem to be a trivial consideration, plus, many miners would be using the halving as an exit opportunity after it makes their equipment no longer competitive.
19  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin in the classroom, yes or no and why? on: January 15, 2017, 01:55:11 AM
This is for a personal writing project I'm working on. I imagine that Bitcoin would be good for things like teaching things like math with decimals ("How many Satoshis do you need to get a tenth of a Bitcoin?", stuff like that), budgeting (Spend it on whatever you want, but when it's gone, it's gone), or even a little bit of IT / programming stuff like how cryptography works. What do you guys think of this?

I got some of the students to post stories, homework writing assigments and such on our school's blog (along with their Bitcoin addresses that I had shown them how to get). Then I asked attendees at our local Bitcoin Meetup to visit the blog and donate to the kids.

You should have seen their faces when they opened their wallets!

That led to me building a site, with a similar goal, but available to any school or student at http://blogsbystudents.com/

They can still post their own address on their own articles but this startup is part of a bigger project to derive long-term income from the traffic. Students can use their blog site to sell advertising in the entire network (as a fundraiser). They may make some sales from what comes in via the web, but also from personal contacts and relatives. SO, instead of selling chocolates, or cookies or raffles, a class or a school could sell advertising. They all continue to get paid commissions continuously for each and every ad purchase infinitely.


20  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Bitcoin in legal sense on: January 15, 2017, 01:43:12 AM
I think the word "currency" is just a construct of language derived from usage by people. That's why Bitcoin already is a currency (i.e. a crypto-currency) and it doesn't need any entity to authorize its existence (because it already exists).

What you might be wanting to know if it has been declared "legal tender" in any country and I am 99% sure it has not. The irony, though, is that most people don't have a clue what the term "legal tender' means in a legal sense.

I don't think Bitcoiners would generally like the idea of Bitcoin usage being forced upon anyone (that is what "legal tender" laws accomplish).
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