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1  Other / Archival / Re: SIGN PETITION FOR PAYPAL TO ACCEPT BITCOIN on: October 18, 2014, 06:19:15 PM
I guess noneof you realise that even though Paypal will accept Bitcoin in certain selling areas, there is no seller protection, don't you?
2  Other / Off-topic / Re: Answer the question above with a question. on: August 09, 2014, 03:33:58 PM
What's the topic now?

What question is it, are you blind?

Wouldn't a blind person still be able to know what the topic is, by using a software which reads out loud a page's text?

Are you referring to a sort of reverse Dragon?
3  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Parent will, need legal advice. on: August 09, 2014, 10:42:11 AM
Situation: (uk location)

Parents divorced long time ago, Dad has a new wife (long time ago).  Dad is 2 decades older than my step mum so would likely die before step mum.  In his will i am a substitute executor of his entire estate.  My step mum is executor.  In step mum will i am executor of her estate.

I told my dad....if it was his intention (he says it is after both him and step mum die) to leave me his estate (money is largely his) i feared the step mum will could be changed for whatever reason if he was to die first. -  which it can right?

I asked for stipulations to be made so that after his death the step mum cannot radically alter her will. Do such stipulations even exist ?




Get a lawyer, now.
4  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: August 09, 2014, 10:40:54 AM
Banned for insulting Ham and also any pork derivatives

Banned because I have been gone for a while and now I'm back.
5  Other / Off-topic / Re: Answer the question above with a question. on: August 09, 2014, 10:40:08 AM
No hints? I have no idea what they're even asking for. I've tried 10 different dates.
Why don't you offer to pay to fuck her?
How much does she charge?
Are you willing to pay her in BTC?
If I pay in Doge, can I get doggy?

Why would you want doggy?

Been gone for a while and why should I not have been?
6  Economy / Speculation / Re: Bitcoin will plummet to $10 by first half of 2014 on: August 01, 2014, 05:22:00 AM
Uhhhh...why he was wrong, and why he fits a pattern that might well be useful to people who don't max out the font size?

You may now kiss my ass.

Thank you.
7  Economy / Speculation / Re: Bitcoin will plummet to $10 by first half of 2014 on: August 01, 2014, 03:51:44 AM
The guy was wrong!

What is it about that that you do not get?
8  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Is becoming a Western Union Agent a fast track to USA Compliance? on: August 01, 2014, 03:49:50 AM
I would consult with a lawyer to be honest, if I was going to try to get US compliance for doing something with Bitcoin.  Unfortunately I think because BTC is relatively new it could cost a little more than normal because it's not obvious what the answer is, so the lawyer will have to do some research.  Eventually all this stuff will be available on the internet I think but for now it's a bit of some educated guesswork I think.
This is probably the best advice on this thread. Federal AML laws are very complicated, and case law can make them even more complicated. By meeting with a lawyer who is legally required to act in your best interest, you should be able to receive sound legal advice.

Gonna cost you a couple of mil USD to do what you want to do.

Find something else.
9  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: August 01, 2014, 03:46:39 AM
Banned for being confused about a banned rhino that somehow isn't from Africa

Banned because you forgot about the very rare Indonesian Rhino.
Banned for previously skipping somebody else's reply.
Banned for being an animal

banned cause i misread your name as btclaire, and i like the name claire...

Banned for disclosing personal fetishes in this thread - might want to keep that in the NSFW threads.

Banned because I'm brand new.

Banned for banning himself..

Banned for quoting such big quote which I had to quote also.

Banned because I am in a bad mood!

Off with his head!
10  Economy / Speculation / Re: Bitcoin will plummet to $10 by first half of 2014 on: July 31, 2014, 12:04:22 AM
This man was obviously wrong

Ya fuckin' think?

Wink
11  Economy / Speculation / Re: Bitcoin will plummet to $10 by first half of 2014 on: July 30, 2014, 11:28:57 PM
by Victor Kerezov

Mark Williams, a risk management and capital markets professor at Boston University, is out with a bold call – he predicts that the price of one bitcoin will crash to $10 or even lower by the first half of 2014.
Williams is a risk management practitioner and academic with tw-decades of experience from working as a bank examiner at the US Federal Reserve to a commodities trading floor senior executive.
The finance professor observes that the buying and selling of the digital currency is “controlled by only a handful of exchanges in places like China, Slovenia and Bulgaria.” Exchange bankruptcies are not uncommon for the roller-coaster bitcoin market. In addition, the exchanges are based on a peer-to-peer model and regulation is virtually absent.
Bitcoin “has not been bear-market tested and if enough sellers try to run for the door it is not clear that existing infrastructure is capable of executing trade orders without significant time delays and price risk,” clarifies the former commodities trader.
Some bitcoin aficionados claim that the digital currency would replace the US dollar as the new global reserve currency, while others believe the digital form of money would provide a cheaper alternative to expensive payment platforms such as Western Union. “Adding more helium to the story, the Winklevoss twins of Facebook fame, not being shy about talking up their own book, predicted prices would rise to a staggering $40,000 per coin”, notes Williams
At the start of this month, bitcoin peaked at over $1,200 as “e-currency evangelists trumpeted the endless possibilities to be unleashed”. However, the price more than halved since then as the ‘Chinese regulatory pin’ burst the hyper bubble. In the view of the risk management expert, “the market has finally realized that hype alone cannot support lofty prices”.
Mark Williams then goes on to say that every asset bubble has three phases: “growth, maturity and pop”. He believes that 2013 was the maturity stage and we are now entering the time when the bubble pops. “Ironically, China, the second largest economy in the world, helped push Bitcoin prices to the clouds and now is pulling prices back to earth,” observes the former Fed bank examiner. In the last two weeks, the People’s Bank of China banned local banks from accepting the digital currency and then forbade third-party firms from transacting with bitcoin exchanges. In between the two announcement, Baidu, China’s Google equivalent, announced it would no longer accept bitcoins. Other major central banks and banking watch-dogs have taken a similar position like the PBoC, warning against the risks of the e-currency.

Williams then goes to proclaim that “if bitcoin was allowed to proliferate as a currency it would produce greater economic uncertainty, reduced trade and lower individual standard of living.” Retailers typically work on tight margins and the immense volatility of the e-currency could eliminate all their profit or even result in losses. In this bitcoin world of uncertainty and risk, commerce would ultimately decline and stone-age bartering would increase. “Naturally, as bitcoin price swings increased, the number of businesses willing to accept e-currency risk would decline”, assumes the former commodities trader.
“Bitcoin is not a legitimate currency but simply a risky virtual commodity bet”, argues the academic at Boston University. Even Winklevii’s call that it is a commodity currency may be unfounded because the wannabe currency does not have a tangible value like gold, which is a widely accepted alternative form of money.
Bitcoin is just backed by dreams and it is “only worth what people are willing to pay”, opines the former Fed bank examiner. “As it becomes increasingly evident that Bitcoin will not be the global currency standard, but simply a novel idea that will be improved upon by more nimble competitors such as Litecoin, restrictions and new regulations will be imposed and prices will plummet.”
“I predict that Bitcoin will trade for under $10 a share by the first half of 2014, single digit pricing reflecting its option value as a pure commodity play”, concludes Mark Williams.

http://invezz.com/news/forex/7726-bitcoin-usd-will-plummet-to-dollar-10-by-first-half-of-2014-predicts-risk-management-expert

FAIL!
12  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: July 30, 2014, 10:11:46 PM
Banned for not having a signature like mine.

banned for having a differnet signature Smiley

Banned for not having a capital letter at the beginning of the sentence and mis-spelling "different"!

Banned for being a gramer nazi.

Banned for mis-spelling "grammar" and not capitalising "Nazi"; it's a proper name you know!
13  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: July 30, 2014, 07:48:07 PM
Banned for not having a signature like mine.

banned for having a differnet signature Smiley

Banned for not having a capital letter at the beginning of the sentence and mis-spelling "different"!
14  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Is becoming a Western Union Agent a fast track to USA Compliance? on: July 30, 2014, 01:04:18 AM
WU is the biggest money transmitter in the world.

So just by being an agent you share their 'license' to transmit money around the world and receive.

Does anyone know if this satisfies the US Fed rule to be a licensed money transmitter? WU sales material states,

https://www.wu.com/AL/en/faq-become-agent.html

Do I need to have a specific licence and will I be regulated?

Yes, but Western Union will handle this for you.

So technically if you have a business and register with WU as an agent, you fall under their license and should not have to register again to satisfy bs Fed rules.

WU is the established money/wire transmitter around the world, so if you offer as part of a business exchange services, you should be able to take and send money for btc as a licensed agent of WU.

Anyone seeing my point here?

Sure WU is expensive but once you are in the umbrella protection as an 'agent', you can then take checks and money and whatever for btc, and guess what you are an AGENT of the biggest money transmitter in the world.

So WU agent status makes an agent a defacto money transmitter.

IMO

Anyone else seeing this the same way.

I can see WU getting 100K new agents if this is the answer to all the bs regulations going on, you put that WU agent number on your site and you are 100% legit to the feds.

Bitcoin is just a new currency, you can take any type of currency you want around the world as a WU agent, take and receive in USD, GBP, Euro, Yen, whatever right.

So just join WU and be part of the largest network of money transmitters around, then a client can choose, wire me money, send a check, go to WU or send me gold bullion or I'm here bring your cash.



No.
15  Economy / Speculation / Re: Bitcoin will plummet to $10 by first half of 2014 on: July 29, 2014, 11:14:37 PM
by Victor Kerezov

Mark Williams, a risk management and capital markets professor at Boston University, is out with a bold call – he predicts that the price of one bitcoin will crash to $10 or even lower by the first half of 2014.
Williams is a risk management practitioner and academic with tw-decades of experience from working as a bank examiner at the US Federal Reserve to a commodities trading floor senior executive.
The finance professor observes that the buying and selling of the digital currency is “controlled by only a handful of exchanges in places like China, Slovenia and Bulgaria.” Exchange bankruptcies are not uncommon for the roller-coaster bitcoin market. In addition, the exchanges are based on a peer-to-peer model and regulation is virtually absent.
Bitcoin “has not been bear-market tested and if enough sellers try to run for the door it is not clear that existing infrastructure is capable of executing trade orders without significant time delays and price risk,” clarifies the former commodities trader.
Some bitcoin aficionados claim that the digital currency would replace the US dollar as the new global reserve currency, while others believe the digital form of money would provide a cheaper alternative to expensive payment platforms such as Western Union. “Adding more helium to the story, the Winklevoss twins of Facebook fame, not being shy about talking up their own book, predicted prices would rise to a staggering $40,000 per coin”, notes Williams
At the start of this month, bitcoin peaked at over $1,200 as “e-currency evangelists trumpeted the endless possibilities to be unleashed”. However, the price more than halved since then as the ‘Chinese regulatory pin’ burst the hyper bubble. In the view of the risk management expert, “the market has finally realized that hype alone cannot support lofty prices”.
Mark Williams then goes on to say that every asset bubble has three phases: “growth, maturity and pop”. He believes that 2013 was the maturity stage and we are now entering the time when the bubble pops. “Ironically, China, the second largest economy in the world, helped push Bitcoin prices to the clouds and now is pulling prices back to earth,” observes the former Fed bank examiner. In the last two weeks, the People’s Bank of China banned local banks from accepting the digital currency and then forbade third-party firms from transacting with bitcoin exchanges. In between the two announcement, Baidu, China’s Google equivalent, announced it would no longer accept bitcoins. Other major central banks and banking watch-dogs have taken a similar position like the PBoC, warning against the risks of the e-currency.

Williams then goes to proclaim that “if bitcoin was allowed to proliferate as a currency it would produce greater economic uncertainty, reduced trade and lower individual standard of living.” Retailers typically work on tight margins and the immense volatility of the e-currency could eliminate all their profit or even result in losses. In this bitcoin world of uncertainty and risk, commerce would ultimately decline and stone-age bartering would increase. “Naturally, as bitcoin price swings increased, the number of businesses willing to accept e-currency risk would decline”, assumes the former commodities trader.
“Bitcoin is not a legitimate currency but simply a risky virtual commodity bet”, argues the academic at Boston University. Even Winklevii’s call that it is a commodity currency may be unfounded because the wannabe currency does not have a tangible value like gold, which is a widely accepted alternative form of money.
Bitcoin is just backed by dreams and it is “only worth what people are willing to pay”, opines the former Fed bank examiner. “As it becomes increasingly evident that Bitcoin will not be the global currency standard, but simply a novel idea that will be improved upon by more nimble competitors such as Litecoin, restrictions and new regulations will be imposed and prices will plummet.”
“I predict that Bitcoin will trade for under $10 a share by the first half of 2014, single digit pricing reflecting its option value as a pure commodity play”, concludes Mark Williams.

http://invezz.com/news/forex/7726-bitcoin-usd-will-plummet-to-dollar-10-by-first-half-of-2014-predicts-risk-management-expert

You lose!

Shoulda bet you like 1K bitcoins.
16  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: July 29, 2014, 11:13:35 PM
Banned due to political correctness.

Banned for trying to be politically correct.
17  Other / Off-topic / Re: Ban the person above you (jokingly). on: July 29, 2014, 10:45:44 AM
Banned for insulting a lost dutchman
Banned for not quoting the post above.
Banned for quoting the post above.

Banned for mining VirtualCoin

Banned for being atheist

Banned for not enjoying the plentiful satire and sarcasm dispensed on these forums.

Banned for telling the truth.

Wink
18  Other / Politics & Society / Re: More From "The Religion Of Peace": Pakistan mob kills woman, girls...... on: July 29, 2014, 10:43:34 AM
Islam is a hypocrite religion.

Are sure that you don't mean "All religions are hypocrite religions."?

He's probably a Christian Tongue

Yeah but as he wrote, "ALL religions are hypocritical!"
19  Other / Politics & Society / Re: More From "The Religion Of Peace": Pakistan mob kills woman, girls...... on: July 29, 2014, 10:42:36 AM
Im an athiest. Just saying, dont mock a religion because of a few crackhead radicals, all religions are just the same piles of shit anyways.

Yes, all of them are. But let's face it, Islam is currently the most barbaric.

Unless you live in Kansas, as do I, in which case we have a fundalmentalist Xtian governor who wants to be President.
20  Other / Politics & Society / Re: More From "The Religion Of Peace": Pakistan mob kills woman, girls...... on: July 29, 2014, 10:41:18 AM
1 Billion muslims in the world.

Only 20% are fanatics.


Here's some nice tasters for all you shitheads out there,

LOOK AT ALL THESE RELIGIONS!

http://www.godhatesfags.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zionism

Dont try to make one religion look bad when all of the others are just as shit too.

Shitheads...nice, you kiss you mom with that mouth?

Hey look, only 20% of all people in prison are murders - don't try to make all prisoners look bad  Cheesy  Enjoy the strawman.

Looks like someone doesnt get the point. Roll Eyes

Does your mom call you special before you go for bedtime?

You tried to answer a strawman generalization that you felt the people in this forum were making by making sweeping generalization about other religions.  Was there a point in there somewhere?

What you meant to say is that the majority of true Muslims would not condone such horrible behavior by what outsiders may see as their brethren.  I would agree with that.  Just like Catholics probably don't condone their priests to be molesting boys by the dozen.

I personally don't ascribe to any particular faith and I have friends from many faiths as I live in Los Angeles and we have all types of people here.  I don't judge my friends on their faith, but I can judge the actions of state/police sponsored or condoned killing of a minority group.

By the way you won't find too many Hindus, Buddhists and Taoists killing others in the name of their faith.

Don't know much about history, do you?
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