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1  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Bitcoin only Businesses that reject all fiat on: May 05, 2015, 12:09:18 PM
I am interested in compiling a list of businesses that exclusively accept Bitcoin. Businesses that exclusively accept bitcoin are a value added asset to our community as they are more likely to not immediately cash out and any person doing business with them are incentivized to buy bitcoin first. These are the businesses we should value and support first and foremost as they are placing their trust completely in our ecosystem.

-snip-


That is the shitty part with merchants that accept - exclusively or not - Bitcoin.
They cash it out to fiat.
But that is completely understandable because even though they might pay their employees in BTC, they have suppliers that want cash.
They want nice, predictable numbers, too - probably because whoever's spearheading this wants to keep their job. You still get scolded in the business world if you make exponentially more money than you originally forecast because it probably means you didn't really know what you were doing while committing company resources to the project. Almost all enterprise software doing anything with cash forecasting over a span greater than a few months will factor in inflation, and while we don't have great models for something largely arbitrary, we're talking about differences of a few tenths of a percent YoY vs 50-5000% variances YoY. Even over the past few months, even though we're saying bitcoin's super-stable, it's still super-volatile compared to almost any national currency.

The risk appetite for BTC-only businesses is concerning in itself. Holding large percentages of reserves in BTC is dangerous, especially for resource-strapped startups.... but most of those on the list have survived quite possibly the most boring (thinking purely as a speculator) valleys in BTC history, which was preceded by a drawn-out, moderate decline in value. Maybe they have low transaction volume and keep a tiny inventory (it's a hobby), or maybe they just have tons of resources in reserve to draw from, or maybe they really are just cashing out even though they don't accept fiat.
2  Other / Off-topic / Re: Commercial grid-tie solar on: May 05, 2015, 11:53:14 AM
Somebody help me before I propose something stupid!
3  Economy / Economics / Re: Money is an imaginary concept, but humanity is enslaved by it on: May 05, 2015, 11:45:35 AM


By this interpretation (which I don't disagree with), cash is effectively representative money with the caveat that cash is not guaranteed to be redeemable for any arbitrary amount, instead relying on market functions. Cash itself is worthless, but it represents X units of "anything and everything" (at least within the issuing country, dependent on their legal tender laws, if any!). Since "whatever we want" is basically the most maximally valuable commodity in the Universe, cash is maximally valuable to everyone (unlike, say, camels or silver nuggets), but only while it represents "whatever we want."

The real issue with the traditional definition of representative currency is that it MUST be legal tender for it to be maximally valuable -- I really don't give half a shit about being able to redeem it for a silver nugget because
1) I have no direct use for silver nuggets and don't want the clutter (there's no single item on Earth I want in such quantity that I'd want to be able to spend my net worth on owning... except maybe Tesla Powerwalls - those things are fucking amazing).
2) in the event of some monetary disaster where I'd actually consider redeeming cash for nuggets, I presume the chance of the nuggets actually being there is very low.

Combined, this makes representative currency (by traditional definition) a giant waste of resources. If the best use we can find for gold, silver, rhodium, and whatever is storing them in a warehouse, aliens should kill us all right now. Similarly, using useful items as a medium of exchange is terrible. -So we use relatively useless items. Cash is fantastic with regards to work efficiency because the paper, fabrics, and polymers we use to make fiat in the world has negligible value (not completely the case with all the semi-effective anti-counterfeiting shit built in these days, but the value's still very low). Who really gives a shit if a bank is storing $10,000,000,000 in nominal value using $291.50 in actual material costs (the actual cost of manufacturing the bills) -- I mean, that's pretty cool that we've been able to add what we were using as money back into the productive economy - but it left us open to policy abuse by the issuers, which turned out to be governments (which is probably far better than banks, at least), so I see bitcoin as the final evolution here and putting the final nail in the coffin of using otherwise-useful resources as something to keep in your pocket or a warehouse. "Redeemable" (if you trust the issuer... a LOT) crypto put a bit of a twist on that, but I don't honestly believe it has any place in the mainstream.

The problem is not about the cost, it is about the arbitraging behavior related to the money. This has already been observed on many alt-coins, especially POS coins

If a money unit cost $291.5 to make, but command a market price at 10 billion dollars, thus become a presentation of value, then what will happen? Everyone will try to produce this money and use its market value to purchase other things, because they can make a quick profit right away. This will raise the competition in money creation and raise its cost, at mean time anyone accepting this money will only be willing to exchange similar value of $291.5, no more

People will be forced to accept a market price of $10B if they are not allowed to produce this money, that's how fiat works today. And that's the reason it is called monopole money: Only banks allowed to make money at a cost of $291.5 and spend it like 10 billion. But for a money that everyone can make like bitcoin, its production cost will always be close to its market value, due to arbitraging
Agreed. I should've phrased that better. One of the coolest features of Bitcoin is that it can always be produced, but the amount of effort put into minting scaled up with price and we had a very low price for a long time In The Beginning - so most of our coins were mined for very little effort (relative to today's amount of work required). Well over half of the bitcoins are already staked, so we get the same arbitrage effect you describe without having had to pour many, many more $millions (billions?) into minting these coins as we would have if we started mining at the current difficulty.
4  Other / Off-topic / Re: Commercial grid-tie solar on: May 04, 2015, 01:18:24 AM
Bump
5  Bitcoin / Press / Re: [2015-05-03] Virgin's PitchtoRich, LazyPay the only Bitcoin startup takes part on: May 03, 2015, 04:00:18 PM
Gweedo's harsh. ... -But yeah.

What differentiates LazyPay from BitPay outside the lack of experience, wide-ranging legal blessings & guidance, staff, money, and userbase?

-And don't say grit. Tongue
6  Economy / Trading Discussion / Re: Selling Cheap Ciggarettes!! Need Advice on: May 03, 2015, 03:38:04 PM
Cigarette prices are controlled primarily by governments, not markets. They'll seek extradition if you poke at their tax monopoly too much.
7  Other / Politics & Society / Re: My mommy bought me an education, am I smart now? on: May 03, 2015, 03:31:21 PM
probably not, schools and universities teach the youth to be pussies and not much else

True.  Not too long ago there were rifle racks in the back of the classrooms and you could hunt small game on your way to class.
Nowadays, there are crazy things like truancy laws and "I was out hunting wabbits" isn't a valid excuse (unless the kid hallucinates, in which case he still needs a doctor's note). Kids today are so rich, they can buy small game on the way home from school. Kids today are so spoiled, one can work only a few hours after class each day and afford to buy his family a home theater at Christmas. Kids today are so lazy, they'd rather type a topic into Google than go ask a librarian where the index cards are, find a stack of books to take home (don't make eye contact with the guy with his hands down his pants don't make eye contact with the guy with his hands down his pants), then, over the course of three days, have the librarian photocopy relevant chapters of the book for the kid to go home and read, then hand-write a barely-legible 10-page pencil stain (but the teacher realizes this and gives kids a month, rather than a week or less, to finish the report). Kids today are so gay... ... alright, they're pretty queer - I blame the transition to highly-pungent, colorful shampoos for men - or maybe the massive reduction of violent crime outside areas with a high concentration of mal-adapted backwoods inbreds (some White, some Black) which makes it perfectly fine to be polite and focus on your actual task rather than judging everyone around you to determine whether or not they're about to slash your face open, take your wallet, and rape your girlfriend, then slit all passerbys' throats and suicide-bomb the post office, and while pieces of his body are blasting out of the post office, his final pre-mortem act is to ejaculate on children playing in the streets. IF YOU DIDN'T HAVE A GUN, YOU'D BE FUCKED.
8  Economy / Economics / Re: Money is an imaginary concept, but humanity is enslaved by it on: May 03, 2015, 02:40:59 PM
This is not a proof (of money having value per se). Though I was hoping that you would address the issue that I raised in my post (since that would be a proof). I mean, the compliance (or lack thereof) between the notion of money having value as such and the law of diminishing marginal utility...

It is proof. Value is somebody prefering one thing over the other.

We could go on discussing the two types of value again, but this time I wanted to stress that money is value.

So you don't want to address the issue of the discrepancy that I pointed out, okay then. Would money have value to you if you could buy with it only things that you don't need (and couldn't barter with) and, consequently, couldn't that you do? I guess that it wouldn't. Therefore it is not money per se that has value but the value of things that you can buy with it, and only through these things that actually satisfy your needs money obtains its value...

And this pretty much explains the apparent contradiction between the law of diminishing marginal utility and money not conforming to it. If you still disagree, then you have to explain this non-conformance somehow
By this interpretation (which I don't disagree with), cash is effectively representative money with the caveat that cash is not guaranteed to be redeemable for any arbitrary amount, instead relying on market functions. Cash itself is worthless, but it represents X units of "anything and everything" (at least within the issuing country, dependent on their legal tender laws, if any!). Since "whatever we want" is basically the most maximally valuable commodity in the Universe, cash is maximally valuable to everyone (unlike, say, camels or silver nuggets), but only while it represents "whatever we want."

The real issue with the traditional definition of representative currency is that it MUST be legal tender for it to be maximally valuable -- I really don't give half a shit about being able to redeem it for a silver nugget because
1) I have no direct use for silver nuggets and don't want the clutter (there's no single item on Earth I want in such quantity that I'd want to be able to spend my net worth on owning... except maybe Tesla Powerwalls - those things are fucking amazing).
2) in the event of some monetary disaster where I'd actually consider redeeming cash for nuggets, I presume the chance of the nuggets actually being there is very low.

Combined, this makes representative currency (by traditional definition) a giant waste of resources. If the best use we can find for gold, silver, rhodium, and whatever is storing them in a warehouse, aliens should kill us all right now. Similarly, using useful items as a medium of exchange is terrible. -So we use relatively useless items. Cash is fantastic with regards to work efficiency because the paper, fabrics, and polymers we use to make fiat in the world has negligible value (not completely the case with all the semi-effective anti-counterfeiting shit built in these days, but the value's still very low). Who really gives a shit if a bank is storing $10,000,000,000 in nominal value using $291.50 in actual material costs (the actual cost of manufacturing the bills) -- I mean, that's pretty cool that we've been able to add what we were using as money back into the productive economy - but it left us open to policy abuse by the issuers, which turned out to be governments (which is probably far better than banks, at least), so I see bitcoin as the final evolution here and putting the final nail in the coffin of using otherwise-useful resources as something to keep in your pocket or a warehouse. "Redeemable" (if you trust the issuer... a LOT) crypto put a bit of a twist on that, but I don't honestly believe it has any place in the mainstream.
9  Other / Off-topic / Re: Complete the sentence... "I would sell all my Bitcoins if..." on: May 03, 2015, 01:53:13 PM
I could be a woman and have Elon Musk's babies.
10  Other / Off-topic / Re: western cosplayers are look too old to Cosplay on: May 03, 2015, 01:50:20 PM
Completely agree. Please kill off cosplay in the West, especially the US. We shouldn't take chances with the Asians in the US as they're significantly more likely to be impure, so even though it's supposedly a melting pot, should be banned. Highest legal loli purity comes from the Japanese where it may as well be forbidden to cross-breed and not leave their homeland. Japanese in Japan may cosplay to their hearts' content -- plus young people in Japan are exotic, so they have that going for them, too.

Also ban that fattie in the left of that shot.

Join the anti western cosplayers movement, a movement for anyone especially Anime fans who agree western cosplayers must not touch Anime characters.

Anyway, that fail cosplayer on the left is too fat? I don't notice that.
Super-fat. I think if I were selling tickets to a pure-bred Cosplay event, it'd be most reasonable to sell it like zoo admission. Look but don't touch, right? Westerners can come in and dribble their Big Macs all over the floor while they shuffle through the hallways and look at the real cosplayers. Maybe we have days where the Westerners dress up like Porco Rosso or something (so when they annihilate any romantic image associated after dressing like the pig they just jerked off, at least its their own fault).

Biggest problem I predict is Russians and Chinese trying to disguise themselves. Chinese already screwed themselves, though, and Russians look so old I don't think it's a problem. Westerners think Chinese women look young because the only time they've encountered them is while watching the Olympics and seeing 12-year-olds passed off as adults. My thought here is that Westerners then are expecting the Chinese to appear ten years younger already and thus won't confuse them with pure-bred Japs.
11  Other / Off-topic / Re: western cosplayers are look too old to Cosplay on: May 03, 2015, 01:31:06 PM
Completely agree. Please kill off cosplay in the West, especially the US. We shouldn't take chances with the Asians in the US as they're significantly more likely to be impure, so even though it's supposedly a melting pot, should be banned. Highest legal loli purity comes from the Japanese where it may as well be forbidden to cross-breed and not leave their homeland. Japanese in Japan may cosplay to their hearts' content -- plus young people in Japan are exotic, so they have that going for them, too.

Also ban that fattie in the left of that shot. TOO OLD. TOO FAT. Go home!



People without blonde hair should also be banned since light pastel colors are almost never sufficiently achieved. -But if we could get a convention full of skinny Jap girls with blonde hair, that'd be great. I'd love to sell tickets to that because it's something I can really believe in.
12  Other / Off-topic / Re: Commercial grid-tie solar on: May 03, 2015, 11:48:25 AM
What is the per kw price when compare to traditional power?
With a 50-year simulation, after incentives and since we'd be "locking in" on inflation (so this is in "May, 2015 dollars") - $.0124/kWh in the first set-up (cheap poly panels), $.0125/kWh in the second set-up (presumably more long-lasting mono-si panels and different inverter setup), $.0201/kWh in the third set-up (expensive mono panels with passive sun-tracking mounts). This also assumes the panels can be resold after fifty years for 20% of their original value, which I'm unsure of, and assumes nothing breaks (which I'd price in if I thought I could do reasonably).

The biggest difference compared to how this'd be set up in a residential setting would probably be the loan rate, but some states may have very generous rates for solar projects.
13  Other / Beginners & Help / Re: getting bitcoin pls read me on: May 03, 2015, 02:40:39 AM
no faucets but rotator, do the following

search for at least ten good rotator with 50+ faucets or 100+

open them all together, then start resolving captcha on each of the faucet of each rotator

you could reach 0.01 easily in this way in less than 4 hours of work
I wonder if you meant to be sarcastic. If he put in 8 hours a day, every day - he'd still make more than most people on Earth (individually, of course!).
14  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Service Discussion (Altcoins) / Re: Warning! don't used "coingather.com" Any more! on: May 03, 2015, 02:37:41 AM
Hello everybody,

i deposit more than 8300 NTRN in this fucking site "https://www.coingather.com/"
when i try to withdraw it
i show this message "ProcessedError"
that's problem from Apr 20, 2015 11:30:59 AM

i contact him many time , without any response , BeCareful guys

Confirm Printscreen


They gather your coins?
It's supposed to be a really poorly executed play on MtGOX, I think. Magic the GATHERing. ... And Coin, and MtGOX was a coin exchange so.. ... .... ..... maybe not. Anyway, might buy myself some interns...
15  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Baltimore burns. Why? on: May 03, 2015, 12:57:35 AM
There's really no segment of society worse at writing, editing, and analyzing news than the media. It's amazing.

Headline: Woman shot dead after trying to ram security barrier at White House

The woman is revealed to be Miriam Carey in the opening statement. Later, they point out there was a baby in the vehicle who was "in 'good condition.'" There are no other people named Carey indicated as relevant by the story.

Closing paragraph: Both Carey and the police office were taken to the MedStar Washington Hospital Center. A spokesman would not comment on their conditions.


This isn't isolated - it's a systemic problem in our society! I'm convinced I could take this post to any journalist and have <20% identify why this is fucked up. -But I guess just communicating the event at all is better than having it competently communicated. Truly infuriating story... thank you for posting. Angry

See also:
<20% of newspaper/"webpaper" editorial staff will notice the bold/italicized text is fucked up.
16  Other / Politics & Society / Re: [Vote] Who did 911? on: May 03, 2015, 12:43:24 AM
Official version?  The question is not whether people agree with all aspects of some "official version", but something entirely different.

It is about questioning the gigantic leap you made in your thinking between a comment by Rumsfield as to level of detail in transactions, to your presenting a theory of govenrment involvement in 911 to destroy records of 2T of transactions.  That ridiculous leap is the issue here.  That dog don't hunt.

And yes, accounting down to the transaction level is a product of very cheap computer memory.

Your colloquialisms sure are slicker than snot on a doorknob! Concluding that when 2.3 trillion dollars goes unaccounted for, that some or most of it may have been stolen is not a giant leap in logic, in fact when money goes missing that is usually the first thing people look at. Clearly there were many reasons for the 9/11 attacks, but pointing out one of the potential motives does not mean that was the only reason why it was perpetrated. Your failure in logic is your own inability to critically examine the inconsistencies of the 9/11 commission report because you are too busy "debunking".



It's not even "debunking."

I'm just trying to indicate that 8 annual entire budgets for the entire Defense department was not and is not "missing."  Keep in mind in this discussion that these budgets (which I doubt you have ever actually looked at, but please do) have black budgets right there laid out that way.    They don't have to tell you what they spent that money on, but you do get an idea of the size of those sub budgets.

You can't develop a conspiracy theory on it being an inside job by first, "making up" the word "missing" and then mis interpreting that word to allow for massive thievery that required a coverup.  That's ridiculous.  Look at the actual budgets and the actual things Rumsfield said and what he meant and you'll see.

So you have not "pointed out one of the potential motives."  Go ahead, point out some others that do make sense - be my guest.

That's the point.

The only ridiculous is spendulus Wink

you still believe what the government shows you. so be it, hope that makes you sleep better Smiley
but am not swallowing that, and so is now most people of the world and all the families of people who perished in the 9/11... maybe they are wrong too. and the countless architect who proved that the free fall cannot happen because of jet fuel which has already burned out in the first 20-30 minutes of the crash, maybe they are wrong too, and rumsfeld saying a day before 9/11 that the pentagon cannot track 3.2 Trillion $. well maybe he was wrong too at that time. or he was drunk. then the countless other witnesses might be wrong too. and the person who "received" the passports of the hijackers from a man who ran right after giving him the passport, well maybe he was dreaming or he set up a lie. secret of the usa in wtc7 came to ash in a free fall from supposed heat from another building 1 football pitch away, well people who believe it was demolition, they might be wrong too. everybody is wrong except the people who governs usa and the specific companies directly involved with the president of that time, well they are right..

am i not right spendulus? Smiley

No, you have a rambling line of nonsense.  I've explained rumsfield.  You were wrong about steel, wrong about aluminum, wrong about light pieces of paper and plastic fluttering around, You were wrong about many other things.

Many of these things are based on chemistry and physics, so there isn't any "arguing" about them.

Basically you just need a warm comforting blanket inside which no Muslims do bad things, so you'd prefer a conspiracy where The Great Satan (USA) Did 911.

Oh, wait a minute.  There's that darn ISIS.   I guess there are some really evil people in the Muslim community.
Even the president of the ISIS USA has confirmed there are no Muslims in ISIS.
17  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: m-of-n USB cold storage native in Windows Server 2008+? on: May 03, 2015, 12:18:51 AM
cons: can't do this with paper wallets, requires 3+ removable devices, not extendable to m-of-n (can only support  n-2 <= m <= n). I don't see what's the point of this idea when there's m-of-n transactions implemented natively.
Is it native, now? I'm still on... uhh.... 9.2.1 -- maybe time to upgrade.
18  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Is Marital Rape a Crime? on: May 03, 2015, 12:15:21 AM
as common as breathing....? That would suck so much. Can you imagine having to defend women as frequently as you breathe? It'd be like being Captain Kirk in tOS, but you wouldn't even have time for them to repay the favor. -UNLESS THE WOMEN USE BITCOIN AND SCAN CAPTAIN KIRK'S URI TATTOO! obviously
19  Other / Politics & Society / Re: [Vote] Who did 911? on: May 03, 2015, 12:09:21 AM
Transnational heroin traffickers (basically George Soros).
20  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / m-of-n USB cold storage native in Windows Server 2008+? on: May 02, 2015, 11:54:35 PM
Convert USBs to dynamic disks with the disk manager. Convert to RAID 5 or 6 in WinServ 2008 or 2012 (anyone know a way to force Windows 7, 8, or 10 to software-manage fancier RAID configs?).

Poof - you now effectively need m of n USB disks to access your coins with minimal effort on your part (do you need to match the USB ports? Beats me!). You're welcome (I have no idea what happens if you start writing some updated wallets or keys to some USB sticks and not others, and then try to write to those others later without rebuilding). The Internet suggests you can also natively do this in some linux distros.
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