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1  Economy / Service Announcements / Re: [ANN] CLOUDMINR on: July 08, 2015, 07:58:48 PM
Hello,

Is this hacking attempt related to the fact that you have been increasing the amount of your "sales" in the week leading up to your outage? Would you care to comment on this?
2  Bitcoin / Mining speculation / Mining Contract Providers - Free Research on: July 06, 2015, 08:36:48 PM
Hi Bitcointalk,

I've put together a research and evaluation methodology for Cloud Mining Contract Providers, similar to Puppet's thread on Bitcointalk. I'm releasing it for free in hopes of possibly gaining donations in the future if people find it valuable. Check it out! Feedback is welcome.

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B1WmjQGHyapWfnM5REhzbFNfX3RlLUtUMVR0ejMyd0JRU1JKT25YYjh2Uk4xT3l1aktpSEk&usp=sharing
3  Bitcoin / Press / Re: [2015-06-11] CCN: SCAM ALERT: BITCOIN CLOUD SERVICES on: June 11, 2015, 05:52:15 PM
I can add that their payout address 1BTCPayb5AdF8fSsR7oews2PpuVpRtamk6 has paid on June 7 to clients but not since. There have been smaller payments sent to other addresses but nothing that resembles a regular mining payout. Hope everyone out there is able to diversify among cloud mining providers if they are willing to risk investing with them at all.
4  Economy / Securities / Re: [Havelock] Bitcoin Difficulty Derivative (BDD) on: May 19, 2015, 05:51:53 PM

For some reason, I'm not divorced yet ....


Very good question LOL
5  Economy / Securities / Re: [Havelock] Bitcoin Difficulty Derivative (BDD) [Update May 3, 2015] on: May 18, 2015, 05:23:17 PM
Nope at the end of this month or sooner when the "purse" hits near 0 game is over no refunds, nothing just the last daily dividend.

Then "hopefully" a new round  will start and we'll have to buy back in to fill the "purse".

Icon

I have asked Havelock multiple times to remove the 'Annual Yield' from the site, but they have not.

I've found their yield to be incredibly misleading as well. I feel as though they are using a formula which is appropriate only for persistent securities and not those like BDD.
6  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Intelligence Operatives. Are they here? Make the case. on: April 04, 2015, 05:25:28 PM

terrifying. but also so interesting. so far it isn't impacting ordinary people but will that last? interested to see how this data collection impacts ordinary people in the future. its like doug casy says, its something to this effect, liberty is never something thats going to go away, its just that in the future you will have to purchase it. we just better all manage to somehow become wealthy enough to purchase liberty in the future.

I imagine that data collection, at least that which is passive, is going on now through social media channels and through search engine-type collection mechanisms. I guess you could also say that liberty is something that every citizen should work to uphold, both for themselves and the people around them. Liberty tools like VPN access do in fact cost something, but knowledge on how to protect your liberties still has to be worked for. For example, getting off of facebook, keeping your public web postings clean, knowing how to secure your BTC or other assets, etc.
7  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Intelligence Operatives. Are they here? Make the case. on: April 04, 2015, 05:38:54 AM
NSA whistleblower interview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3owk7vEEOvs
8  Economy / Service Discussion / Re: Recovery program beginning in January for PB Mining customers. on: March 15, 2015, 01:46:07 AM
Dear PB Mining,

The copyright year on your website needs to be updated to 2015 from 2014. There may be other things to look at with your site, I'm not sure.

Thanks,
BM
9  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: How Many Bitcoiners are Mentally Ill? on: February 23, 2015, 09:07:29 PM
genius and madness, it's nothing new.

almost all great artists and scientists were somewhat bi-polar.

i believe it's an evolutionary thing. Not everyone who is close to madness can manifest their genius. Only the "fittest" ideas (and implementations) survive.

also, people who are considered normal by social standards do not have the motivation or guts to foray into experimental territories such as this.

and:



Actually, wouldn't being able to tolerate more stress make you a healthier person ?..
10  Economy / Games and rounds / Re: FREE NETFLIX ACCOUNTS! on: February 23, 2015, 05:32:39 AM
I would take one! (if still available)
11  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: How Many Bitcoiners are Mentally Ill? on: February 15, 2015, 07:43:34 AM
How many Wall St workers are mentally ill?
How many Silicon Valley tech heads are mentally ill?
How many government bureaucrats are mentally ill?
How many psychologists are mentally ill?
Welcome to reality.

I for one don't recommend spending too much time on this or other political/economic/financial/conspiracy websites than is healthy. As with all things. Bitcoin, arising from the internet mainly, consists more so of internet-dwellers who are used to sharing and posting and linking on forums to their heart's desires. Other people in other spheres probably read books, study, talk with their friends, and maybe get drunk and move on with things. But internet-dwellers I think have difficulty functioning outside of the basement very well.

MUST WE TRUST A PAYMENT SYSTEM INHABITED AND OPERATED LARGELY BY THESE BASEMENT DWELLERS??!!

Would-be video game developers, network admins, tech support people. If these are the people largely participating with Bitcoin then the project will surely have problems. Financial education, policy education, sales, risk management, legal assessment ability. I can think of many competencies that this set of people would lack that would be required to operate a successful payments network. So I hope that Bitcoin is contributed to by more than just these types. I also hope that the bitcointalk forum is a poor representation of the participants involved.
12  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 07, 2015, 06:35:52 PM


The following is an article I wrote that argues how free energy devices might be developed more quickly now thanks to Bitcoin. I'm hoping to forward these ideas in some way. I hope it's a shared interest in this community as well


I see your point, but the bitcoin itself is insane dump on energy resourses (@ time of writing Network power consumption
2513.31 MW) , and as such its hardly driver for free energy.
Wouldn't some POS coin be more optimal choice?


Network power consumption, compared to facebook's, google's, apple's, the pentagon's, and all the ATM machines around the globe being used 24/7? How about those millions of tons of soil being moved everyday for rare earth elements for smartphones, then shipped into containers around a global physical network?

Insane indeed.






Free energy is supposed to take electricity from static in the air. So how much of it getting consumed by the network afterwards probably won't be a concern like it is with burning oil or coal.

But for this paradigm shift to take place now, you would need two things: a quantum leap in tech and a global event. A catastrophic global event. Free energy from thin air everywhere will not solve poverty, to the contrary. It could put poverty up side down in the world at first. If I have infinite energy why would I want to trade anything with you? If I have free energy but I have nothing to eat as I was born in a place with a very poor ground, where nothing grows, how can I still trade something with you when you have free energy and an amazing rich soil where anything grows? No need to wait for that oil from the saudis if I am the one who's blessed with this heaven on earth, but the saudis can't eat their desert...

Free energy will not eliminate disparities nor wars...


If most wars are over resources like oil then free energy would definitely change the incentives. Also, neither free energy or Bitcoin alone will lead to a global decentralized civil society. People also have to be sophisticated enough themselves to be able to function in such a way.

People used to fight all the time, and oil was never an issue. Land was the main issue.  Many wars stopped because the resource to commit to them for years cost more and more and made them unsustainable.

Now imagine a world were it would have been pointless to cut the nazi's oil supply to keep their fighter planes on the ground... Infinite energy would have kept them flying forever.

Don't get me wrong. I love the idea of free energy. We need to find a solution for bitcoin, etc. One just need to always think about the worse that could happen in a "what if" scenario, which is the case you've presented.

 Smiley



All right, that's a good point. Keep the free energy tech out of the hands of those who would use it to start WWIII.

Maybe only very secretive technologists could pull this off then. Staying in the shadows with what they know, they could create their own free energy-powered miners and vanish from the grid completely. One can dream Smiley
13  Economy / Economics / Re: Were the Keynesians wrong? on: February 06, 2015, 07:07:46 PM
I put this out there to people; do you, as an individual, choose not to support the prevailing economic paradigm since it violates morality at its core? ie. inflation which steals value from savers. Or do you meld into the collective and parrot news about how some companies might not meet their obligations, basically adding sentiment to the keynesian paradigm. It's your choice.
14  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 06, 2015, 12:42:57 AM


The following is an article I wrote that argues how free energy devices might be developed more quickly now thanks to Bitcoin. I'm hoping to forward these ideas in some way. I hope it's a shared interest in this community as well


I see your point, but the bitcoin itself is insane dump on energy resourses (@ time of writing Network power consumption
2513.31 MW) , and as such its hardly driver for free energy.
Wouldn't some POS coin be more optimal choice?


Network power consumption, compared to facebook's, google's, apple's, the pentagon's, and all the ATM machines around the globe being used 24/7? How about those millions of tons of soil being moved everyday for rare earth elements for smartphones, then shipped into containers around a global physical network?

Insane indeed.






Free energy is supposed to take electricity from static in the air. So how much of it getting consumed by the network afterwards probably won't be a concern like it is with burning oil or coal.

But for this paradigm shift to take place now, you would need two things: a quantum leap in tech and a global event. A catastrophic global event. Free energy from thin air everywhere will not solve poverty, to the contrary. It could put poverty up side down in the world at first. If I have infinite energy why would I want to trade anything with you? If I have free energy but I have nothing to eat as I was born in a place with a very poor ground, where nothing grows, how can I still trade something with you when you have free energy and an amazing rich soil where anything grows? No need to wait for that oil from the saudis if I am the one who's blessed with this heaven on earth, but the saudis can't eat their desert...

Free energy will not eliminate disparities nor wars...


If most wars are over resources like oil then free energy would definitely change the incentives. Also, neither free energy or Bitcoin alone will lead to a global decentralized civil society. People also have to be sophisticated enough themselves to be able to function in such a way.
15  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 05, 2015, 08:20:44 PM
Hi Bitcointalk,

The following is an article I wrote that argues how free energy devices might be developed more quickly now thanks to Bitcoin. I'm hoping to forward these ideas in some way. I hope it's a shared interest in this community as well. I appreciate any tips and comments!

-BM

----

Bitcoin has become a driver for many financial and technical innovations. From being able to send funds with a cents-on-the-dollar fee, to being able to run a headless international payments system. A possibility I think that is overlooked is its additional ability to drive innovation in the free energy space.

Free energy was a concept hypothesized and successfully carried out in practice by 20th century physicist Nikola Tesla, and other since. Free energy is the ability to extract usable electricity from static in the air. Many inventors have worked with the free energy concept and have developed prototypes. Few if any prototypes make it to market however due to the entrenched nature of the petroleum, coal, and centrally-controlled and metered power utility companies. Free energy, being a radically decentralized form of procuring usable electricity, goes strongly against their business model. Stories from around the internet can be found where inventors are bullied or killed by those who have stake in the centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure model in order to keep their prototypes from being developed for the wider market.

I would argue that Bitcoin, in its architecture which rewards computing power being added to the network, would also by extension reward and provide incentive for the further development and deployment of free energy technologies.

A gripe among Bitcoin enthusiasts is that profitability becomes difficult to achieve when faced with fixed, and in some cases, steep electricity costs. Costs imposed on these Bitcoin network operators (“miners”) are a result of the centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure. The centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure, in most cases run by state agencies, are filled with slack and theft, as are probably most state-run agencies. These slack and theft costs in turn result in a higher price for electricity that would be above its true cost by some margin. As an aside, one can speculate that the true costs of electricity are too high as well – given that it is now the 21st century but free energy concepts have been demonstrated early in the 20th century.

Bitcoin network operators / miners will continue to seek alternative ways to increase their profitability, like all rational actors. Unlike ordinary consumers of electricity, whose business or personal endeavors lie somewhat more abstracted from the cost of electricity, to Bitcoin miners the cost of electricity is of prime concern. Any way to increase power output per dollar spent grants a large competitive advantage. So for this group an alternative electricity solution would be particularly appealing – more so than to the average home or business owner.

I argue that with Bitcoin miners seeking to increase their power output per dollar spent more than other actors in the economy that this will drive for more rapid development and adoption of free energy technologies. Where other actors historically have blocked free energy tech. from emerging, or have been largely indifferent, the incentives guiding Bitcoin mining will lead to free energy emerging sooner than if Bitcoin did not exist. For the first individual or group that can secure and deploy mining hardware with a fraction or none of the electricity costs normally associated, this person or group will make profits that will blow the other miners out of the water completely. For the reclusive inventor sitting on some piece of tech., the entrepreneurial Bitcoin miner seeking to MASSIVELY blow out their profits, would want to meet, shake hands, and tactfully develop something. To put it bluntly, reliably usable free energy tech. is the next big nut for Bitcoin to crack, and once it does, it may feel like the world rapidly leaps to a stage in development that has been decades overdue.

The wider impact that will result is difficult to fathom. It would have the potential to rapidly stabilize debt levels in the developed world. Pulling this off would ensure that the developed world could continue forth without having to rely on immigration, on exporting its institutions to less developed cultures that may not yet be ready to assimilate them, or on old-world pillage-and-plunder-of-resource tactics through military aggression.

I hope this essay inspires and reaches the right people.

If you enjoyed reading please tip me at 152DrxMzxQnzsLRzKWgS61foSfTZ3kygvR. I think about this stuff a lot and could always use the extra coins Wink


We are but a few years away from what the light bulb did to the candle and oil. We haven't cracked that puzzle yet, but it will be cracked eventually. Then this (almost free) energy will impact everyone, everywhere, including bitcoin. Computer systems with built in bitcoin mining hardware will be common place by then.

As far as what you are describing, we are still here. Not light bulb yet.




I agree. It's important to do what you can to advance goals like this, in my opinion. Lest we sit around like yokels, ivory tower academics, or lazy rich people.
16  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 05, 2015, 08:15:26 PM


The following is an article I wrote that argues how free energy devices might be developed more quickly now thanks to Bitcoin. I'm hoping to forward these ideas in some way. I hope it's a shared interest in this community as well


I see your point, but the bitcoin itself is insane dump on energy resourses (@ time of writing Network power consumption
2513.31 MW) , and as such its hardly driver for free energy.
Wouldn't some POS coin be more optimal choice?


Network power consumption, compared to facebook's, google's, apple's, the pentagon's, and all the ATM machines around the globe being used 24/7? How about those millions of tons of soil being moved everyday for rare earth elements for smartphones, then shipped into containers around a global physical network?

Insane indeed.






Free energy is supposed to take electricity from static in the air. So how much of it getting consumed by the network afterwards probably won't be a concern like it is with burning oil or coal.
17  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 05, 2015, 08:12:12 PM
Free energy wont happen as long as people can make money on electricity. Also do you not see the catch 22 heere? In order to make Bitcoins you need electricity (yeah there are solar panels but how many use it?).

Can you name some of the technical innovations that BTC has made, if we look away from decentralizing part?

I understand that free energy won't be available to the masses if money can't be made with it. But I think that miners would have an interest in tracking down some devices and this would put market pressure on such devices being produced afterwards.

No new technical advances have probably occurred as a result of Bitcoin. Chip technology deployed is likely nothing new, nor are distributed computing concepts. The ways cryptography is used are new, but encryption algorithms themselves are probably not new. All of this is probably a good thing. It shows the empahsis that is being put on solving real-world societal problems. Bitcoin is not some university pet project by a longshot.
18  Other / Politics & Society / Bitcoin as a Driver for Free Energy on: February 05, 2015, 01:13:13 AM
Hi Bitcointalk,

The following is an article I wrote that argues how free energy devices might be developed more quickly now thanks to Bitcoin. I'm hoping to forward these ideas in some way. I hope it's a shared interest in this community as well. I appreciate any tips and comments!

-BM

----

Bitcoin has become a driver for many financial and technical innovations. From being able to send funds with a cents-on-the-dollar fee, to being able to run a headless international payments system. A possibility I think that is overlooked is its additional ability to drive innovation in the free energy space.

Free energy was a concept hypothesized and successfully carried out in practice by 20th century physicist Nikola Tesla, and other since. Free energy is the ability to extract usable electricity from static in the air. Many inventors have worked with the free energy concept and have developed prototypes. Few if any prototypes make it to market however due to the entrenched nature of the petroleum, coal, and centrally-controlled and metered power utility companies. Free energy, being a radically decentralized form of procuring usable electricity, goes strongly against their business model. Stories from around the internet can be found where inventors are bullied or killed by those who have stake in the centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure model in order to keep their prototypes from being developed for the wider market.

I would argue that Bitcoin, in its architecture which rewards computing power being added to the network, would also by extension reward and provide incentive for the further development and deployment of free energy technologies.

A gripe among Bitcoin enthusiasts is that profitability becomes difficult to achieve when faced with fixed, and in some cases, steep electricity costs. Costs imposed on these Bitcoin network operators (“miners”) are a result of the centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure. The centrally-controlled electricity infrastructure, in most cases run by state agencies, are filled with slack and theft, as are probably most state-run agencies. These slack and theft costs in turn result in a higher price for electricity that would be above its true cost by some margin. As an aside, one can speculate that the true costs of electricity are too high as well – given that it is now the 21st century but free energy concepts have been demonstrated early in the 20th century.

Bitcoin network operators / miners will continue to seek alternative ways to increase their profitability, like all rational actors. Unlike ordinary consumers of electricity, whose business or personal endeavors lie somewhat more abstracted from the cost of electricity, to Bitcoin miners the cost of electricity is of prime concern. Any way to increase power output per dollar spent grants a large competitive advantage. So for this group an alternative electricity solution would be particularly appealing – more so than to the average home or business owner.

I argue that with Bitcoin miners seeking to increase their power output per dollar spent more than other actors in the economy that this will drive for more rapid development and adoption of free energy technologies. Where other actors historically have blocked free energy tech. from emerging, or have been largely indifferent, the incentives guiding Bitcoin mining will lead to free energy emerging sooner than if Bitcoin did not exist. For the first individual or group that can secure and deploy mining hardware with a fraction or none of the electricity costs normally associated, this person or group will make profits that will blow the other miners out of the water completely. For the reclusive inventor sitting on some piece of tech., the entrepreneurial Bitcoin miner seeking to MASSIVELY blow out their profits, would want to meet, shake hands, and tactfully develop something. To put it bluntly, reliably usable free energy tech. is the next big nut for Bitcoin to crack, and once it does, it may feel like the world rapidly leaps to a stage in development that has been decades overdue.

The wider impact that will result is difficult to fathom. It would have the potential to rapidly stabilize debt levels in the developed world. Pulling this off would ensure that the developed world could continue forth without having to rely on immigration, on exporting its institutions to less developed cultures that may not yet be ready to assimilate them, or on old-world pillage-and-plunder-of-resource tactics through military aggression.

I hope this essay inspires and reaches the right people.

If you enjoyed reading please tip me at 152DrxMzxQnzsLRzKWgS61foSfTZ3kygvR. I think about this stuff a lot and could always use the extra coins Wink
19  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bill Gates Calls for ‘Global Government’ on: February 02, 2015, 06:45:54 AM
I've never understood the opposition to a global government. It always seems to come from conspiracy theorists that lack critical thinking skills. What are we suppose to do? Never become united? Remain separate entities constantly vying and warring for territory and power? Does that really sound like the intelligent thing to do?

Well the idea is that since it's the 21st century and with improved transportation and communications, we no longer really need nation states that are more or less concepts out of the late middle-ages when people were less intelligent, much more religious, etc. The original American state was intended to be more of a service provider and record-keeper instead of a deity like the British crown and its empire. It gets into the question of what do you really need from a service provider today compared to pre-internet, pre-industrialization, etc.

So part of the problem is that most of the world is not as culturally developed as other parts of the world. It's really difficult for people to think beyond the idea of nation states at this point. Nation states are permitted to collect taxes with the threat of violence, and this is very much an old-world concept, for example. And with that you get greedy people stealing money, squandering funds, and so on. If you can get people to view the state as just a service provider and not a false god to worship then this would be progress.

Radical leftists groups, and other groups like the Club of Rome have tried to discuss efforts to set up global management structures. And some already exist. There's a global currency which exists called SDRs (Special Drawing Rights), but it hasn't yet been implemented. The fact is, like Bill Gates barely being able to keep Windows from being bug-free on release, is that a national or international economy is impossible to manage since it is so complex. The prospect usually attracts some pretty dumb-headed people who can't recognize this fact or think that someone could pull it off. But it can't - every socialist state has failed in the past and all you have today are Cuba and North Korea which speak for themselves. The Bretton Woods system, which was a currency value-pegging scheme set up after WWII to manage European debt with the USD, is also now not really being recognized by Russia, Brazil, and China. So all of these efforts to "share and manage" wealth and debt aren't really working now since the world is getting so damn more complex. But the flipside of it is that nobody really wants to start a war for real anymore now. The US still has the largest military in the world be a huge margin, so you can't deny that. But the EU is BARELY working as we can see with its debt problems. In my opinion even if an Anglo-American alliance, or an American-EU alliance were to be set up it would be a resource draining nightmare and the world is just better off with a coherent and stable payments system that is neutral to any single nation state for those who want to participate in civil society. Cooperation and markets will form at a more micro level and things will still get done - but more slowly. For the rest like ISIS who simply don't want to participate, leave the door open if they ever decide they want to behave again, but otherwise just abandon any efforts to appease them or even interact with them. I see no reason why they still get internet service at this point.

ISIS, North Korea, bits of trouble in Europe, Israel/Palestine, there's not much else to worry over. Africa is developing and so is South America. You can probably have missles pointed at these hotspots should anything flare up, but I think civil society will be able to manage otherwise.
20  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Bill Gates Calls for ‘Global Government’ on: February 02, 2015, 02:01:07 AM
I know Gates is incredibly successful, but what makes him think that his success in business and computers makes him qualified to be the authority on what type of world government the planet needs? America is a pretty diverse place, with 300 million citizens, and look at the level of disagreement and political vitriol that exists here. How much more dysfunctional do you think a world government representing 7 billion people would be, where the majority of government on the planet has corruption as a central tenet of its existence? I think it's so unworkable that not only will it never be possible in our lifetime, but it will never be possible PERIOD.

It's because the majority of government on the planet has corruption as a central tenet of its existence that it is possible, nay probable. They will claim they have the consent of the governed, when really people just have a self-preservation instinct, not willing to roll the dice in a global guerrilla war or get moved to the front of the line to the ovens.

I don't live in the United States so I can testify to this. Where I'm from, even among professionals, there is a shared understanding that to secure a certain standard of living one must align themselves with the big banks, the government, big phone companies, the media, the hospitals, the energy companies, or whatever. Outside of the United States there are fewer individuals per capita that have established themselves so that they are not tied to cartels - so to speak. If a larger state structure gets proposed, fewer people in other countries actually have the freedom built up to oppose it.
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