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1  Economy / Securities / Re: ASICMINER: Entering the Future of ASIC Mining by Inventing It on: December 30, 2017, 09:52:02 AM
I am preparing a file for the Embassy of PRC in my jurisdiction, with all known and assumed information regarding identities and activities of friedcat et al. This includes email addresses they used to communicate, online accounts, incorporation documents, domain registration history, photographs, bitcoin addresses, etc.
 
If you have anything to contribute along those lines, please go ahead. Keep in mind that there may have been attempts to "poison the well" by planting misleading information in the forums, so try to stick with verifiable information.

The hope is that, with the new evidence that fraudster(s) is/are alive and well, and that funds are being moved, authorities can track him/them down and prosecute. Recent increase in the value of stolen assets should help getting the due attention - a US$200,000,000 fraud is a significant issue.
2  Economy / Securities / Re: ASICMINER: Entering the Future of ASIC Mining by Inventing It on: December 27, 2017, 10:07:29 AM
Good old 蒋信予, Jiang Xinyu. He will be turning 31 this September 14th from what I understand. I have been working on tracking down the cat, he can't disappear forever.

Since it seems that he owns a decent stash the stockholders could try to organize to recover something. As an owner of 200 shares on Havelock I would happily pay 50% of whatever is recovered in my name to whoever does the job.

Count me in.
3  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Should miners collude to steal funds from wallet confiscated by US government? on: October 12, 2013, 06:30:28 AM
I hereby quit bitcointalk.
4  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Bitstamp is proactive about compliance on: October 10, 2013, 06:51:11 AM
Personally I have no problem with governmental regulation at the exchanger level, because its super easy to launder the Bitcoins after or before exchanging in or out. USD can already be easily tracked, so it makes sense to make the exchange process as clean as possible.

Can you provide a hypothetical example explaning how bitcoins can be laundered? To get started, let's assume I have been milking my neighbour's cows and selling the raw milk for bitcoins, falsely advertising it as mother's milk. There are several more-or-less illegal aspects of my business. I need to launder those coins. Please enlighten me. Let your creativity run wild. The end goal is to have the coins laundered, meaning I can convincingly demonstrate that my coins in fact originate from some sort of legal business.
5  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX on: October 09, 2013, 07:40:41 AM
Isn't it odd that FBI still fails to understand that there may be a backup copy of privkey somewhere?  They have not moved the coins to an address they created! I would breaking a drop of sweat per second...

Why do you say that? Where have you got this info from?
Assuming 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX was under DPR's control before he got arrested

That's exaclty what (in my opinion) you got wrong. A brief analysis of that wallet will tell you (as discussed already in another thread) that is more than likely that the wallet was created and firstly used by the FBI. The first transaction was on the 2nd of October, and you can see that that one, and all the following ones, are collective transactions coming from multiple wallets, each one having only one single transaction before being moved to 1F1Aa. Exactly what you would expect in the following scenario: FBI got access to those wallets and all their private keys, created a cold offline wallet to hold the seized bitcoins, moved there every bitcoin found in those wallets. You will also see that in the last two days (apart from small transaction to leave and send a message to FBI) there are other transactions going on (25,10, 30, 15 btc..). As more than one member suggested, they are most likely standing payments to the SR accounts' owners (or pool mining fees) that where not revoked.

Does it make sense? Cheers! Smiley

Thanks for pointing out, I feel better now.
6  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX on: October 09, 2013, 07:03:14 AM
Isn't it odd that FBI still fails to understand that there may be a backup copy of privkey somewhere?  They have not moved the coins to an address they created! I would breaking a drop of sweat per second...

Why do you say that? Where have you got this info from?

Assuming 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX was under DPR's control before he got arrested, it is likely he's got backup copies of the corresponding private key somewhere. We all back up our wallets, right? Multiple copies of paper wallets in different locations?  Brain wallet?  Somebody else may get hold of a copy of this private key (which was supposedly sitting unencrypted on one of the imaged servers), or DPR may covertly pass on the private key to someone. FBI and prosecutors might wake up one morning just to find out that their "seized assets" have disappeared from their custody because they were too lazy to read and understand how Bitcoin works.
7  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX on: October 09, 2013, 03:02:24 AM
Isn't it odd that FBI still fails to understand that there may be a backup copy of privkey somewhere?  They have not moved the coins to an address they created! I would be breaking a drop of sweat per second...
8  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: SilkRoad domain Seized? on: October 08, 2013, 07:14:35 AM
People keep discussing security of DPR's wallets as something he should try to ensure. The reality is opposite: he desperately needs to provably spend these coins before being locked up with a bunch of curious inmates who might decide to pick his brain in search of a brain wallet. The easiest and most productive way for him would be to forfeit the keys to the government, as this might not only keep him safer in the prison, but it might reduce his sentence. Another, more spectacular way would be to arrange for the coins to be sent to a black hole, such as 1111111111111111111114oLvT2.
 
9  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX on: October 07, 2013, 05:11:48 PM
1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX should be printed on a t-shirt.

Secondly, what if a poster on said address declared that all his contributions are considered a loan, wouldn't that make it more difficult for the FBI to liquidate the funds IF they do have access to private key?

What if I stated that each post you make in here from this point on constitutes your promise to pay me one bitcoin?

What if I declare myself an ordained POEE priest?
10  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: SilkRoad domain Seized? on: October 07, 2013, 05:07:28 PM
While bitcointalk was down, someone mentioned in an IRC channel that the only BTC the feds seized were from buyer and seller accounts.  Apparently ulbrichts BTC was never seized and still lies in a wallet somewhere (which makes sense, because I always wondered how the FBI could ever get their hands on that).  I couldn't find this is any recent news articles, however, and contradicts what I've read before.  Can anybody confirm this?

According to Forbes, the FBI confirmed they hold encrypted wallets in addition to what was already seized.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2013/10/04/fbi-silk-road-bitcoin-seizure/


Quote
The spokesperson says the approximately 26,000 Bitcoins seized are just the ones that were held in Silk Road accounts. In other words, itís Silk Road usersí Bitcoin. The FBI has not been able to get to Ulbrichtís personal Bitcoin yet. ďThatís like another $80 million worth,Ē she said, explaining that it was held separately and is encrypted.


11  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: SilkRoad domain Seized? on: October 03, 2013, 12:26:59 AM
Can someone explain how they managed to identify his server running a Tor service? From there on it seems straight forward, they got access to the server through a request with the LE in the host country.

Anyone?
12  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: SilkRoad domain Seized? on: October 02, 2013, 09:28:14 PM
Can someone explain how they managed to identify his server running a Tor service? From there on it seems straight forward, they got access to the server through a request with the LE in the host country.
13  Other / Off-topic / Re: Atlantis down? on: October 02, 2013, 08:24:21 PM
Just an excercise in free and anonymous market strategies:

If operators of SR were selfish assholes (they seem to be nice folks, but let's forget that for now), they would absolutely start a fake competitor, then scam users and vanish. They get free press (every Atlantis article mentions SR), they get coins, they distract the authorities and divert their resources, and they make themselves look great in comparison.
EDIT - in the light of revelations from the FBI files, the chief operator of SR was a total ass. Murder-for-hire level ass. Just saying. He had all these memorable quotes, all while being a total ass. Not as bad, deceptive, and murderous as a typical president of his country, but still.
14  Other / Beginners & Help / Re: Btc address? on: October 02, 2013, 04:22:38 AM
Hi all,

my question is regarding btc deposit addresses. Ok say if I have a wallet with exchange A (which I have btc in) and I wanted to transfer to exchange B (a different wallet I have). Lets say exchange A's "deposit address" at the time was K12190ic and exchange B's "deposit address" was B019210c. If I was to deposit to exchange B using the btc from exchange A, would the deposit address of exchange A (K12190ic) show it sent to exchange B's deposit address (B019210c). Basically I want to know if I was to check on blockchain.info or blockexplorer, if I would see the origin address as (K12190i) or if I would see a completely different wallet address that is sending to exchange B?
Almost certainly not. Exchanges (and most online wallets in general) typically maintain an internal database to track users' balances, and only make sure it all adds up (we hope). Thus, your deposit address with one online wallet service will most likely not be involved in the transaction from that service to another (external) bitcoin address.
15  Other / Off-topic / Re: [NSFW] Let's post images of beautiful women in this thread on: October 01, 2013, 09:09:42 PM
Does this count?
16  Other / Off-topic / Re: Let's post images of beautiful women in this thread on: October 01, 2013, 04:02:58 AM

Interesting. What's the story?
17  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Edward Snowden BTC ADDRESS 1snowqQP5VmZgU47i5AWwz9fsgHQg94Fa on: September 30, 2013, 08:12:39 PM

Additionally, using just one address is not good as the National Security Agency (NSA) has calculated or will calculate the private key if they have such an intention.
There is a bigger problem related to reused addresses in this context. Tracking down the donators.
18  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Bitstamp is proactive about compliance on: September 30, 2013, 02:57:30 PM
Bitcoin exchanges exchange bitcoins for government-issued money. It makes perfect sense to accept and play by the rules of those governments. If anything there bothers you, take it up to your government, or simply quit using their money and remain within Bitcoin ecosystem.
19  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: Swiss national councillor to ban Bitcoins on: September 30, 2013, 02:48:54 PM
on my bitcoin u won't find cocaine.

I wouldn't go that far. Many transactions can likely be traced through an occasional SR deal.
But yes, more crime is based on the good, old government-issued cash than on bitcoins. Also, cash is more anonymous.
20  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Bitcoin copying wallet.dat allows sending coins twice on: September 30, 2013, 04:11:32 AM
I did a small experiment, I copied the wallet.dat and put it on another offline computer. I was able to send the same bitcoins twice! How can this be fixed?
It can be fixed by you coming back here and providing an update. Specifically, you could write an essay titled "Why I am not rich yet?".

To help you get started, here is a hint: you were not able to send the same bitcoins twice, at least not any more than you would be able to send them twice by yelling "HERE, I SENT 'EM!!" from your balcony twice. Bitcoin transactions are verified, confirmed, timestamped, and entered into the ledger collectively by a p2p network.
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