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1621  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: While the Occupy Movement Considers Their Next Move, Perhaps... on: December 05, 2011, 06:09:31 AM
I'd like to add one more thing into this post, as to police brutality. This was a 'harmless beanbag round'

Beanbag rounds aren't supposed to be harmless.  They are non-lethal.

I think a wound something like that on the neck has a fair chance of being lethal.
1622  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 04:09:40 AM

+1 
I love where they're trying to head with this - I'm just wary of touting it as a replacement for PayPal at this stage.


In many countries, it is.  I think the $15 fee from Crypto is for wire transfers.  Ask them about cash bank deposits.  I can't imagine them charging $15 if you bring $100 to a bank teller to deposit into their account.


If it doesn't apply to cash bank deposits - they've done a terrible job at explaining this on their site.
Quote
$15 Flat Fee – For all deposits and withdrawals from Crypto X Change

I've tried using their online support to ask about this fee, which included entering my email address - but I got no response.
I'm willing to put this down to teething problems.. but so far it's not looking like a cheap option.


It would be interesting to see a survey of what people in the bitcoin community do pay on average for depositing funds into Bitcoin exchanges.  I'm skeptical that anywhere near a majority are getting it less than around 5% by the time they use one intermediary or another.



1623  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 03:58:21 AM
Thank you for your contribution to the bitcoin community.

+1 
I love where they're trying to head with this - I'm just wary of touting it as a replacement for PayPal at this stage.
1624  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 03:51:11 AM

But if I lose 5% for my initial Bitcoin purchase (I've paid more than that in the past by the way!) - what's the difference between being hit up front like that, or getting free initial deposit with PayPal and then hit with a fee for every purchase?  Actually.. the difference is you come out ahead with paypal because it's less than 5% right?

I also pay another 5% or more if I want to get my Bitcoins out.


You could use an exchange called https://intersango.com which has zero fees to buy or sell.  and deposits and withdrawals are also free, unless its a wire transfer.  there is no need to pay 5% in or out.

Took the words right out of my mouth.

If you don't want to pay a 5% fee to use bitcoins, find another method of obtaining them.

Looks like the cheapest intersango option for Australians would be wire in Eur, losing some small fee on exchange, plus wire fee (in my case $22) + 2.56EUR intersango charge.

edit: Americans cop a $15USD wire fee... so we're back to requiring all these other intermediaries like dwolla, paxum.  Not exactly simple compared to paypal.

What are these other methods that these millions of PayPal users are going to find?

1625  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 03:47:06 AM

But if I lose 5% for my initial Bitcoin purchase (I've paid more than that in the past by the way!) - what's the difference between being hit up front like that, or getting free initial deposit with PayPal and then hit with a fee for every purchase?  Actually.. the difference is you come out ahead with paypal because it's less than 5% right?

I also pay another 5% or more if I want to get my Bitcoins out.


You could use an exchange called https://intersango.com which has zero fees to buy or sell.  and deposits and withdrawals are also free, unless its a wire transfer.  there is no need to pay 5% in or out.

If that's the case for a large slice of users then great - but I don't believe that's the case here in Australia.
I'll pay $15 if I use cryptoxchange, Mtgox only has a wire option at the moment - so that'll hit me with $22, how would I get money from Aus into intersango? Wire again I suspect.
(By the way - now that there are quite a few exchanges - I strongly recommend exchanges make it obvious how deposits/withdrawals work for various countries *before* requiring register/sign in. Most people are not willing to sign up to them all in order to compare deposit options and fees)

Judging by many of the forum posts about hurdles getting money to exchanges, I strongly suspect free deposits are not going to be the case for the majority of people either.

Once free deposits or face-to-face bitcoin exchanges are commonplace - sure, the advantage will shift to Bitcoin.. but can we really push it with a straight face as an alternative for most PayPal users right now?   (Even with the vastly smaller number of places you can use bitcoin for purchases compared to bitcoin this is an uphill sell)




1626  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 03:33:41 AM
Promoting bitcoin meets paypal-wallet services. Yes. Promoting bitcoin itself. Not really.

  Angry


Millions of people use PayPal.  Let's get them to try our thing.

I've only dabbled with PayPal a while ago - but as I see it, for the average consumer, Bitcoin can't compete on Fees yet.
(paypal you pay each transaction, but getting your money into paypal is cheap..  
whereas bitcoin you easily pay 5% or more depending on where you are to get your money into it in the first place)

Also - I hear paypal allows person to person payments.

So..unless they sell things for bitcoins or earn in bitcoins, they're effectively paying more to use bitcoins than they would using PayPal - so what exactly is the angle here that will sell the idea of Bitcoin to the average person?  

That they can send amounts equivalent to a few cents?
The 'political' aspects of avoiding banks or corporations which could freeze your money? (A valid concern - but 'occupy' crowd aside, it's probably not high on the agenda of most people)


PayPal's fee structure.

PayPal charges fees for every transaction except deposits into your PayPal account and some withdrawals.

Sending money to anyone via PayPal incurs a fee, the only question is who pays it.

But if I lose 5% for my initial Bitcoin purchase (I've paid more than that in the past by the way!) - what's the difference between being hit up front like that, or getting free initial deposit with PayPal and then hit with a fee for every purchase?  Actually.. the difference is you come out ahead with paypal because it's less than 5% right?

I also pay another 5% or more if I want to get my Bitcoins out.

edit: Note, I'm a bitcoin supporter - but let's be honest about it's advantages and not bullshit about it's weaknesses. I'm not saying Bitcoin won't have an advantage over paypal down the track - I just don't see it right now in terms of cost, so I'm wondering why the average consumer will see it.


1627  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [ANN] Introducing LoveBitcoins.org – Driving 1 MILLION Bitcoin Users in 2012 on: December 05, 2011, 02:53:21 AM
Promoting bitcoin meets paypal-wallet services. Yes. Promoting bitcoin itself. Not really.

  Angry


Millions of people use PayPal.  Let's get them to try our thing.

I've only dabbled with PayPal a while ago - but as I see it, for the average consumer, Bitcoin can't compete on Fees yet.
(paypal you pay each transaction, but getting your money into paypal is cheap..  
whereas bitcoin you easily pay 5% or more depending on where you are to get your money into it in the first place)

Also - I hear paypal allows person to person payments.

So..unless they sell things for bitcoins or earn in bitcoins, they're effectively paying more to use bitcoins than they would using PayPal - so what exactly is the angle here that will sell the idea of Bitcoin to the average person?  

That they can send amounts equivalent to a few cents?
The 'political' aspects of avoiding banks or corporations which could freeze your money? (A valid concern - but 'occupy' crowd aside, it's probably not high on the agenda of most people)


edit: It rather seems to me that this is the 'elephant in the room' when it comes to Bitcoin. It's nice and all as far as easy setup for merchants & people who want to set up donations - but the *effective* Fees when you consider getting it in and out of your local currency are very high with Bitcoin.   
Sure -if you do a very large deposit via wire-transfer etc, the fee becomes a small percentage - but then you're holding a large amount of BTC and can get screwed by the volatility.



1628  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: good way to measure total Bitcoin users? on: December 05, 2011, 02:30:24 AM
I wonder why the node counts on the maps here:
http://www.blockchain.info/nodes-globe?series=48hrs
are always so low?  (rarely over 10K for the 48hr map)

I'm not sure how many nodes are being displayed on the map at:
http://www.weusecoins.com/globe-bitcoin/
But having looked at for a few months, it seems hardly (if at all) to update.

Does anyone know of any other world bitcoin node maps which are kept up to date and seem to show the vast majority of nodes?

A time-series map would be awesome. I'd love to watch the growth as you move a slider month by month!
1629  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Operation Bitcoinstorm! on: December 05, 2011, 01:24:34 AM


Where I see bitcoin succeeding is in killer apps that were not possible before bitcoin
Yeah, killer apps like assassination market. The only missing component was anonymous and untraceable payment system like Bitcoin.

What's an assassination? I've never heard of that before. I guess that must be something that can't be done with cash.  Roll Eyes

'assassination market' is a term that should probably be understood in terms of a system which allows paying the 'reward' without the payee or payer knowing who the other party is, nor having to interact physically in any way. (e.g no 'dropsite' for cash)

In this case, it won't do to compare the situation with some arrangement made with briefcases full of cash, It is indeed an application requiring cryptography and anonymous untraceable digital cash.   Although bitcoin might not be anonymous and untraceable if used naively, it's arguable it could be used in such a manner for applications such as this.
See Jim Bell's famous 1997 article 'Assassination Politics'  - http://cryptome.org/ap.htm


Along with the possible use of Bitcoin in kidnapping,extortion etc - this is one of the reasons I see government 'coin-taint' tagging overlays upon Bitcoin to be an inevitability. People seem to assume such a tagging system would punish the innocent - but it could be implemented in a way that was designed only to inconvenience them to the point of cooperating with authorities to provide information regarding the closest spend-points of the tainted coin. Upon such cooperation, their address-branch would be untainted.








1630  Other / Beginners & Help / Re: Make it Easier for New Members to Realize that They Must Post Here! on: December 04, 2011, 12:10:05 PM
Sadly this isn't a new complaint. 
It's a very valid one though!

I whinged about this ages ago and nothing happened.
It's a shit-awful way to treat new members, but I don't think the people who run this forum care.

1631  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: How to create bills on the cheap on: December 04, 2011, 07:21:37 AM
You could use 100s of the failed currencies of the world and get them for less than a penny each.  Zambia has some beautiful currency.  They even sell them on ebay.

But this doesn't solve the problem of the BTC bills being easy to forge - if you can buy these old notes cheap - so can someone who wants to copy your note and issue it without any value inside.
1632  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: How to create bills on the cheap on: December 03, 2011, 06:47:56 AM
MacGyver ey?  Hackerish ey?

Strong steam-proof glue around edges of a paper flap made out of parts of old zimbabwe notes that you've laser printed a logo over plus signed with your own blood?

1633  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: ASIC's (Australian Securities and Investments Commission) policy on Tradehill on: December 03, 2011, 06:05:07 AM
I'd love to see his original letter. What prompted him to whinge about them in the first place?

edit: by the way.. I'm hardly surprised at the (lack of) action from our regulator.  I once reported to one of our consumer affairs agencies about an Australian guy who was pimping some quackery to cure aids - and was told that 'youtube' was out of their jurisdiction :/  It was bizarre - like if he'd put the ad in a local paper they'd be all over him, but just because youtube is out there on them foreign internets - free pass.
1634  Bitcoin / Press / Re: Bitcoin press hits, notable sources on: December 03, 2011, 04:05:44 AM
I wouldn't normally report on advertisements - but Roger Ver of Memory Dealers does them in a way that promotes Bitcoin itself rather than directly promoting his company.
Here's his latest.

Quote
Zeus Radio ad
Bitcoin

MemoryDealers - Roger Ver
2011-12-02


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pV9ptoCMyc&feature=g-u
1635  Bitcoin / Press / Re: Bitcoin press hits, notable sources on: December 02, 2011, 08:21:15 PM
Not a mainstream press hit or anything.. but the idea of the site "A scientific approach to earning more money" is interesting.

Quote
Making Money With Bitcoins – An Interview With Philip Daniel

2011-12-01

http://www.experimentincome.com/moneybitcoins/

Hypothesis
It's possible to make money bitcoin mining, but it's getting increasingly difficult

...

Conclusion
Right Now, Bitcoin Mining is an unprofitable enterprise. The future of Bitcoin is uncertain.


About Experiment Income
"Our mission is to find out what can earn you more money and what can’t."


Philip Daniel appears to be 'a senior economics major at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo' who is into bitcoin.
1636  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Governments/regulators may eventually actually *like* Bitcoin. - coin blacklists on: December 02, 2011, 06:47:25 PM
The worst aspect of this sort of tagging is the possibility of silent tags.

You innocently spend some coins at the supermarket, and before you know it, the facial-recognition camera at the checkout has worked out who you are and the police come knocking to ask where you got a specific payment from.

While that has some legitimate law-enforcement use - it's also a pretty horrifying invasion of privacy and open to abuse.

I suspect there isn't a technical fix for this.  Bitcoin won't remove the need to fight for legal principles and rights.

edit: Although some ordinary cash is tracked by serial number, the average person just isn't going to remember where they got a particular note from - so it's hardly likely police will come knocking. With a bitcoin wallet though, there's a record and timestamps so it's more of a possibility.


I think you are over reaching with this problem. Bitcoin will eliminate most crimes.

Ok.. I'll bite. Are you being sarcastic?
If not..  How? Do you classify governments and bankers as the commiters of 'most crimes' and think bitcoin will bring them down?
And *I* am over-reaching??


1637  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Governments/regulators may eventually actually *like* Bitcoin. - coin blacklists on: December 02, 2011, 05:46:39 PM
The worst aspect of this sort of tagging is the possibility of silent tags.

You innocently spend some coins at the supermarket, and before you know it, the facial-recognition camera at the checkout has worked out who you are and the police come knocking to ask where you got a specific payment from.

While that has some legitimate law-enforcement use - it's also a pretty horrifying invasion of privacy and open to abuse.

I suspect there isn't a technical fix for this.  Bitcoin won't remove the need to fight for legal principles and rights.

edit: Although some ordinary cash is tracked by serial number, the average person just isn't going to remember where they got a particular note from - so it's hardly likely police will come knocking. With a bitcoin wallet though, there's a record and timestamps so it's more of a possibility.
1638  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Governments/regulators may eventually actually *like* Bitcoin. - coin blacklists on: December 02, 2011, 05:30:34 PM
I'm not sure everybody understands the nature of money-laundering or other shady businesses. It's not the same as blood-money because it's mixed (sometimes heavily) with "clean" money. You can't penalize someone that does legitimate business with someone that also secretly does illegal business. That's the job of law enforcement to determine.

The government could indeed penalize them - and in a fairly automated way.
Sorry - you should have used software which checks our public lists - 10% tax at the supermarket checkout for you! 
(or go spend your tainted coins on the blackmarket - maybe you'll only lose 5% there)

Welcome to Bitcoin's brave new world of 'programmable money'.

Whether you like it or think it sucks is immaterial.  If you're lucky, your government may hit a legal wall in trying to implement it.
Some governments will push such things through anyway.

As I mentioned in my previous long post - I think governments will have to be judicious in their application of these lists, or it'll backfire by just increasing the blackmarket coin liquidity.

1639  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Governments/regulators may eventually actually *like* Bitcoin. - coin blacklists on: December 02, 2011, 05:23:12 PM
This means that bitcoins are perfect for certain types of crime.
Especially kidnapping comes to my mind, since it solves an old problem with kidnapping.

For sure.
Regulators will want to unsolve that problem for the criminals one way or another.
Ordinary cash is barely tolerable in that regard - bitcoin won't be.


Unless you are really naive, its obvious that its going to start a new crime trends such as kidnapping and extortion as we are getting more and more poor and desperate people.

But.


What will happen the day that someone kidnaps a cute kid and ask for the ransom to be paid in Bitcoins?

This becomes something HUGE in the NEWS. The Bitcoin kidnapper, and its going to be reported all over the world.

There will be heated debates and a majority of the opinion will turn against Bitcoins and similar anonymous cryptocurrencies and rightfully blame them for making it possible to ask for anonymous ransomes.

The day this happens, Bitcoins will be abandoned and boycotted by many normal investors, business and normal persons.
No "serious" business will want to be associated with this currency.

If/when it happens its also likely that soon after, just like US blocks pokersites, they will block bitcoin sites and make it illegal to trade with Bitcoins.

European and Asian countries will follow

This would have a huge impact on the price of Bitcoins and nearly destroy them as people panic sell as the value drops, only very few wanting to buy.

I can even see how the people working on Bitcoin will be grilled and held responsible in TV shows.
Recieve hatemails from angry mothers and have to go out and say they were naive and Bitcoin was not meant for these things to happen and that they have stopped working on it or are working on a solution.

Unless there allready is a hidden solution. If there is and the kidnapper is caught, than Bitcoin will be the hero.

I admit I hadn't really thought through the public perception and PR ramifications of this. You're right - it could be devastating.
(Devastating to any mainstream or even semi-mainstream bitcoin aspirations that is. It would still have it's place as a niche underground thing)

I think most people assume the solution would be to track when the coins move in the blockchain, and combined with a few subpoenas and cooperations with major exchanges - do some tracing to try to get closer to the source of the funds.
I don't think this will be good enough.


Bitcoins will still have a place in black markets etc but it will never get legal in US and EU unless there is a way to blacklist adresses.

Even if its possible to trace Bitcoins its enough that a single crazy person think its impossible to trace them and kidnap a kid and ask for Ransome to get the public opinion to hate the coins.

Maybe there acctually needs to be some way in the client or in a cryptocurrency to mark the money legit or illegal.

All there needs to be is a way for clients to check if an adress that money comes from has a message
on a site. Saying that the adress is a illegal adress.

That's right - by adding a 'taint' system with a very public face, the regulators have the advantage that now even the fairly stupid crazies should realize they're going to get caught.  The disincentive to even engage in the crime is an important aspect.




The question than would be by who? Governments/police or exchange services or all of them?

The public and the forum people cannot do this and especially not the software coders.
Since this could open up to blackmailing, mob behaviour etc, unless you pay us, we will taint your adress etc.

These taint lists will be run by governments primarily I think.   Any brick and mortar business must comply with authorities.
Once people find their bitcoins are being taxed at the checkout depending on how much 'taint' they have - they'll upgrade to wallet software which saves them money.
Once a certain number of their peers upgrade - they'll find their coins less acceptable even in personal exchange, so the system is viral in that regard.

Many governments will run blacklists - and perhaps there will be aggregated subscriptions available.




And how will this work in a world?

I think that governments will simply cooperate.
The US will have one list, russia another but most exchanges will have to demand that all lists are clean.
There might be exchanges that dont demand clean lists, but you will probably get less money for your coins at those.

Whitelisted coins will allways be in a higher demand since you will be able to spend them anywhere in the world.

I would imagine it working like this.

The person will see the warning message associated with the adress.
The message could even be of different kinds depending on in which countries they are blacklisted.
If they are proved to be illegal or suspected to be illegal and what type of crime.

"Warning the coins in that adress are from a serious crime. Accepting them is a crime in US, EU etc list of countries."
Please send those coins back and report to us.

Or in another case.

"Warning the coins in that adress might be stolen, accepting them could be a crime in your country"


It will smear onto your adress unless you send them back.
This smearing would make it impossible to make a new adress that cleans the coins.


Would it even be possible? It probably would.

I suspect that rather than just a flat out ban on accepting the coins - they'll be taxed heavily upon entry into an audited exchange or merchant.
They would be 'cleaned' at those entry points once the fee is paid.



But the question remains.

Will the government bother with such trouble?

I dont think they will unless bitcoins are really big.
It will probably just be easier for them to outlaw Bitcoins.

They could "force" well somewhat force, by making it illegal to not do a check against their database to se if a bitcoin adress has some message or not.

Sites that does take money from blacklisted adresses will be taken down or shut out.

This will force people to use a client that can see those messages unless they dont care but that would mean that
they will not be able to use their coins on other than black markets.

If it would be possible, it could make stealing Bitcoins by hacking less interesting and especially kidnapping and asking for ransom.

I think they will bother, if it has a reasonable chance of deterring the crime and/or catching the perpetrators, and if the alternative of banning or doing nothing wouldn't alleviate the problem.
I suspect both these things are true.

Outlawing bitcoins ultimately wouldn't keep the market small enough to prevent this sort of thing. Geeks and others who appreciate bitcoin would still use it for certain things, and it would (after a long slow growth) thrive as an underground currency.

It would be a balancing act.

By publishing taint lists mainly for the worst crimes, the tainted-coin pool is small, and even the average rebellious streaked person is inclined to prefer untainted coins.

If the governments go overboard on the taint list - they provide more liquidity in tainted coins, because those coins still have some value in purely black market exchange.

So.. their best bet in discouraging bitcoin-ransom crimes is not to go overboard with the lists. Keep the tainted coin pool small. Not much of an incentive to kidnap if you can only spend your loot with kidnappers and terrorists.  If however.. governments taint for a large number of drug related crimes - then they massively increase the market for and use of tainted coins.
Taints applied to anything and everything would have less stigma than taints applied judiciously.



What if the stolen Allinvains coins adress was marked as illegal?

It would have meant that when they tried to cash them out a MTGox they would not had been able to do so. MtGox would probably not have accepted those coins.

Saving Bitcoin from atleast one crash.

Their only option would have been to cash them out in the black market.
But at that market they would be worth much less.

I think that even most black markets would check the list.
They would be to curious to see why the coins are blacklisted, some would not accept certain types of coins.

This would also make it less attractive to acctually try and steal Bitcoins since their value would increase.



In the longterm it would probably also mean that you will have to whitelist you adress if you want to use the coins at any bigger company.

Question is if there will be greyzones.

Coins that are not whitelisted or blacklisted.

Thinking of it, it will probably end up with the governments blacklisting all the coins and adresses that are not whitelisted?
Go to the IRS and whitelist them.

I can only see that or all Bitcoins getting illegal in the longterm, but I΄m taking longterm 10-20 years.

I agree this is a longterm thing.  I'm not sure about the 'whitelist' concept. That doesn't really make sense to me at this stage.
I see them 'tainting' certain addresses (with various public and private labels) - and marking certain coins which have a taint further back in their history as 'fee paid - now clean' once they pass through certain audited merchants/exchanges.

I don't think 'Go to the IRS and whitelist them' is a practical solution for the government. Just like being overzealous on the taint-lists - that would simply keep the bitcoin blackmarket liquidity larger - and wouldn't work well on an international basis.



But the question is why should a government bother with having Bitcoins legal unless there are advantages.

I can only see this happen if the people demand Bitcoins, because they dont trust the government printing the money
and because it means banks cannot charge whatever fee they want.

If Bitcoins grow bigger the governments will deal with Bitcoins one way or the other.

The first thing they will do is ofcourse try to regulate the exchanges.
And after that there will more steps that follow.

What would Bitcoins getting legal mean?

Bitcoins getting legal will also mean that their value will increase, since
it would mean that they are here to stay and can be adapted by everyone.

It might still be possible to have anonymous adresses in some countries as long as they pay taxes
and there will probably be higher taxes on them.

I really like the concept of Bitcoin, with less power to the banks, and no government printing etc.

But the anonymity is going to be a huge obstacle for it no matter if we like it or not.

Governments could outlaw bitcoin, or tax it heavily at regulated merchants to discourage its uptake - but that would make bitcoin an underground thing that still has enough interest and liquidity to be used for some crimes such as kidnapping, without giving the government a lot of ways to prevent or punish those crimes.

By applying taint lists, but not going so far as to alienate the average rebellious-streaked geek, they may be able to keep the marked coins with a generally high stigma, and low spendability, as well as encourage some users to cooperate in reporting on sight.

If they taint like crazy for run of the mill drug/prostitution/politics etc etc - then they'll reduce their own effectiveness at fighting the serious issues such as terrorism/kidnap/assassination markets.

I guess some governments will get this wrong - some will eventually get it right.




1640  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Governments/regulators may eventually actually *like* Bitcoin. - coin blacklists on: December 02, 2011, 08:31:08 AM
The original discussion thread about this problem in this forum: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=20979.0  

Thanks for the pointer - I hadn't seen that one.
I don't think that thread explored the ramifications or the possibilities though.

Sure - they couldn't just use this blacklist to stop silk road in it's tracks, because they don't know their addresses,
but they could make it risky to do deals with various 'shady' outfits - because your coins could be tainted and thus taxed.

Stolen coins would be the obvious addresses to add to the list.

Also, a seized wallet from one criminal could provide a bunch of other addresses they could apply taint to.
Honeypot systems could also taint your change.


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