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1981  Economy / Speculation / Re: Myself chart thread :D :D on: July 12, 2013, 04:32:01 PM
Oh, and my parents are fools when it comes to money.

Did they buy Bitcoin?  Tongue

They don't get it, and they've been burnt too many times in the "real" economy to trust anything with a hint of risk.
1982  Economy / Speculation / Re: Myself chart thread :D :D on: July 12, 2013, 04:09:56 PM

Yes.  I was 13 in 1999.  I had earned and saved $1000 and my parents took me to their stock broker.  She had me put half in CSCO and half in ORCL.  What a fucking waste of money.

Oh well, it was a good lesson to learn at that age.  Fuck brokers, they try to sell their firm's bad positions off to you.  Oh, and my parents are fools when it comes to money.
1983  Economy / Speculation / Re: Market cycle : where do you think we are ? (July 11) on: July 12, 2013, 08:37:50 AM
western civilization is also a bubble.

How can I short it?

1.  Borrow Europeans and North Americans.
2.  Sell them.
1984  Economy / Speculation / Re: Oversold? Nah... It's a dead cat bounce.. on: July 12, 2013, 06:57:30 AM
Doesn't look so bad from higher up:
1985  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: ASICMINER BE, has enough area, if covered with solar panel, to power itself? on: July 12, 2013, 06:53:45 AM
Sorry, I should have mentioned USB variation.
Asicminer block errupter USB.

2.5 W

You would still need a panel larger than the USB, but a smallish panel could power it.  Roughly 1/10 of a roof panel.
1986  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: ASICMINER BE, has enough area, if covered with solar panel, to power itself? on: July 12, 2013, 05:55:48 AM
ASICMINER BE, has enough area, if covered with solar panel, to power itself?

Just curious.. Smiley

No.  It uses 10A@12V or 120W, which would require full sun on half of an entire standard roof panel.
1987  Economy / Speculation / Re: Wall Observer - MtGoxUSD wall movement tracker - Hardcore on: July 12, 2013, 05:35:49 AM
Such an epic bull trap.  Grin

uhhh.... you mean bear trap?

I dont think you know what a trap means.


He thinks it's still a bear market and this rally is a trap.
1988  Bitcoin / Hardware / Re: Pictures of your mining rigs! on: July 12, 2013, 05:33:18 AM
A bit of a Medusa at the moment, but I'll clean it up later:


61 AM USB hashing away at roughly 23 GH/s Smiley
1989  Economy / Speculation / Re: Wall Observer - MtGoxUSD wall movement tracker - Hardcore on: July 12, 2013, 05:26:09 AM
That's some pretty heavy dumping going on... $96 bid wall didn't last long.

jup 12k dump and europe waking up

12k? lol.... where did you get this number?

during last 30min 12k or am i reading it wrong Tongue
http://bitcoincharts.com/charts/mtgoxUSD#rg2zig30-minztgSzbgBzm1g100zm2g25zi1gMFIzi2gRSIzvzps

Yes, there was 12k volume in the last 30 minutes, but it was in no way a 12k "dump".  Most of the volume occurred on the upswing.  Just because the candle temporarily falls below the open doesn't mean the entire candle's volume was a dump.
1990  Economy / Securities / Re: ASICMINER: Entering the Future of ASIC Mining by Inventing It on: July 12, 2013, 02:04:48 AM
ASICMINER just finished a 14 transaction block of 175BTC.  I didn't even know that was possible..

Sometimes people accidentally put the transaction amount as the mining fee. Poor guy!

Haha, TAT, the 175BTC was total block transaction value; VE was surprised at the low amount of transactions/BTC relayed in that block.

It's b/c AM doesn't seem to be a well-connected node-

http://blockchain.info/block-index/398496/0000000000000018c4876d76a2111ee374a0699b6d0ada8d8311f231fb0967df

They really should look into p2pool.
1991  Economy / Securities / Re: ASICMINER: Entering the Future of ASIC Mining by Inventing It on: July 12, 2013, 02:04:16 AM
What are you guys talking about?
http://blockchain.info/block-index/398496/0000000000000018c4876d76a2111ee374a0699b6d0ada8d8311f231fb0967df

That transaction only had .0033 in fees.

Indeed... it had 175 BTC total output.  As in all of the transactions in the block.
1992  Economy / Speculation / Re: Goomboo's Journal on: July 12, 2013, 02:02:09 AM
Daily Goomboos: Prepare your fiat!
1993  Economy / Speculation / Re: Wall Observer - MtGoxUSD wall movement tracker - Hardcore on: July 12, 2013, 01:32:42 AM
upupupupup!
Yay!  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

Is it time for the gifs of bulls and rockets yet?

1994  Economy / Economics / Re: Why is bitcoin price not going up? on: July 12, 2013, 01:11:54 AM
From an investment point of view, there are 3 types of investors in mining industry:

1. Investors who bought ASIC devices using bitcoin
These investors are pure bitcoin only, they will never cash out to fiat since they believe the bitcoin is the way to go, they will not affect the market price

2. Investors who pre-ordered ASIC devices last year using fiat money
For them, they might want to get the invested fiat money back, since currently the ASIC devices are very efficient, they only need to sale small amount of coin to break even, and then they can keep it running risk free

3. Investors who pre-ordered ASIC devices recently using fiat money
They will get delivery in autumn, by that time, to return on investment is not that easy, they might need to continuously sell the coins until they reach break even, they will put a pressure on the price

We might see much more sell presure on the market when difficulty went enough high this autumn



ROI in fiat terms has historically been easier if you don't sell immediately.
1995  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: What Bitcoin Could Learn From Gnutella (or, why devs need a spanking) on: July 12, 2013, 12:54:52 AM
Quote
I, for one, would be happy to contribute to a fund to hire professional engineers to produce a spec.


Same here - question is, if someone started such a fund, would BF and the volunteer developers even pay attention to it? That is to say, if we crowd-sourced money to get a few full-time engineers to run all the versions on a test network and develop a protocol spec - in the end, would anyone be remotely interested in it? Esp. since we have a main dev. who is opposed to having a protocol specification (or at least so I've read.) And other devs just don't seem too keen on the whole idea.

Note that I have nothing against the devs, not here to spank them or whatever; just being realistic about their opinions regarding developing specs. I know they work hard. I just want more direction, focus, a cleaner approach to development that encourages alternative clients operating via a well-defined protocol.

On the other hand, maybe BF would eventually hire more full-timers to do that - work on cleaning code, writing protocol, testing, etc. The boring stuff that no one wants to do but is essential to not doing this whole ad-hoc thing with spaghetti code filled with magic numbers. Or maybe someone will start their own foundation that will perform this function and work with BF and the current developers.

Oh yeah, and magic numbers, another pet peeve of mine. Someone posted an IRC paste of Gavin just yanking a projected yearly % increase in broadband out of his butt (based on past numbers, so of course will be accurate in the future) and suggesting basing one of our "magic numbers" in the code on that. Not picking on Gavin, but there's a bigger problem that is illustrated by that kind of thinking.

This thread has some great thoughts and ideas; we need to figure out what to do to make some of these things happen. I could donate more money to BF but for all I know, they aren't even remotely interested in developing a spec or de-tangling the code so who knows, maybe I'd just be contributing to the problem.

I don't like the sentiment that if you don't know how to code, don't complain - there are dozens of other ways one can take action. Organize a bounty/fund, donate to a fund, raise awareness via discussion, donate to BF, install & test patches and alt. client for people who do code, etc.

It would be great if I didn't have to run bitcoind behind armory... their reason for relying on bitcoind basically boils down to "It's spaghetti with no defined protocol spec, what the heck do you expect us to do?" although they explain it nicer than that.


On spaghetti code, I would venture some advice that has worked for me over the decades. Upon "inheriting" some "old code", that "just has to work", I work on a "parallel" version, keeping the original for "current production" and the new for "eventual replacement".

The "parallel" version is not a "refactoring" or rearranging of the code in any fashion, at least not initially. I worked in C and before that assembler, but I see a lot of C in the bitcoind code!

First one must have all the code "in view" and as much in one's head as possible. And using the best IDE and tools one has, begin to first name things properly. This means everything, from class definitions to instance names, methods, member variables. And very important, no magic numbers, like method_name( argument_variable, 0 ). What is the 0? What does it represent?

For example, I am looking at db.h, ~line 117 in the CDB.Read template area. And there is a magic  ssKey.reserve(1000);
OK what does the 1000 represent? Is it important? Does it matter? Shouldn't it be a
const intergal_type Meaningfully_named_Value = 1000;

I know how it is when one is "in the zone", and coding. Documentation is superfluous and slows one down! And in the 1970s, especially, less so in the 1980s, and basically no more in the 1990s and on, variable names were no longer restricted to 8 or 16 characters, or 32 characters (of significance), etc. And [floppy] disc storage didn't force a lot of "vertical" compression (read K&R style here). Nor horizontal compression (read no spaces between operators and operands here). I see a lot of that "residue" in the code.

Just renaming things doesn't change the executable, AFAIK, in a release build. So I would globally, with a careful global search and replace, acknowledging each replacement, names that are obviously too terse, obscure or no longer even representative of what they are, with more meaningful names.

I have done this with some God awful C chess code, to good effect some time ago. One finds dead code, duplicate globals, etc. etc.

It is tedious but neccessary, and the result will be the same .exe file but the code will start to look readable.

I have had many an argument with "upper management" about spending the time to make a code base readable and where the names truly reflected what they are. Otherwise I am constantly translating with a symbol table in my head, what everything means. I hate that, and I hate having to remember things that I know I shouldn't have to!  Example, what is the instance bitdb, see line 29 in db.cpp rally a class of? Then what is the Class CDBEnv{} really? Is it a BerkeleyDB or a LevelDB, or a ? Of what? Wallet, block chain info? I keep digging, hoping to find a comment or some "action" that might nail it down to something definite. Then I can rename it from bitdb to something more meaningful.

I propose that style of renaming, rearranging, etc. that leaves the executable, byte for byte identical. Maybe then we can see the beauty of the forest thorough the ugly arrangement of the trees. I think the .h files especially need a lot of "work". I see hodge podge lines of extern this or that sprinkled in .h and .cpp files!

I would propose this sort of "one to one transformation" of the code to start with, and then it may become easy to: find the bugs that are there, add new "stuff", enhance old "stuff", etc. etc.

BTW, I am doing it myself, off to the side anyway, since I hate K&R style, and all the stuff mentioned above, and more (LOL)

Ron

Please do, then submit a pull request to this github project: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin
1996  Economy / Speculation / Re: [POLL] What will be the top? on: July 12, 2013, 12:46:24 AM
What if there is no 33% drop ever again?  Wink

Then hell has frozen over.
1997  Economy / Securities / Re: ASICMINER: Entering the Future of ASIC Mining by Inventing It on: July 12, 2013, 12:43:51 AM
ROFLOL@"Slight modification, you can roast a cat with nine blades"

Google translate Roll Eyes

http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?spm=2013.1.0.0.9FrPGo&scm=1007.295.0.0&id=18902077702
1998  Economy / Speculation / Re: Wall Observer - MtGoxUSD wall movement tracker - Hardcore on: July 11, 2013, 11:34:53 PM
Mmmm.... The market appears to be distilling quite well.

Could this be the bottom? It's looking good, not many would expect the bounce here, but it does appear that people is regaining trust.

It would take a bull with some balls.  Or at least enough balls to take us up a couple more dollars and trigger the daily goomboos.
1999  Bitcoin / Pools / Re: Help me pick a pool on: July 11, 2013, 11:15:33 PM
If you have a fast connection and good disks, mine on p2pool.
2000  Economy / Speculation / Re: [POLL] What will be the top? on: July 11, 2013, 10:40:52 PM
95, IF we break 90 again. right now it doesn't seem like it, especially considering the walls.

Never consider the walls.  The walls are a lie.

yes this.  you saw how fast that fake $80 wall got pulled

Exactly.  Walls serve to attract front runners.  The buyer (who placed the ask wall) waits for enough volume below their wall to accumulate on the books.  He then pulls his wall and buys all of the cheap bitcoins.  Meanwhile, the panic buyers step in and scream OMG, $90 fell!  Buyer sells a few to lock in some profits and then the game starts over once the market has settled.

You've got a point. It's just crazy watching someone with a lot of bankroll manipulating the market... but I guess that's why I also shy away from high stakes poker tables Smiley

It's just trading.... Manipulation implies they can control it.  They can only exploit opportunities.
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