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1  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule is a GUI to timelock your BTC, and allows you to change your mind on: December 07, 2022, 02:58:58 AM
I have added a video on my website with directions to use BTCapsule. In less than 5 minutes, you can timelock your Bitcoin for inheritance without trusting a third party. Check it out at:

https://btcapsule.com
2  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 29, 2022, 05:28:08 AM
So none of this is about banning Bitcoin. It seems worse to me. Instead, I feel like the government wants to seize the means of Bitcoin production (mining) and start a digital war with other countries to have the biggest hash rate. This would mean individuals could no longer compete with mining.
Philosophically speaking you can define anything as anything (eg. Bitcoin and Speech) but that doesn't mean it is right!
But about this part I have to say it is impossible because the hashrate is already too huge and too spread around the globe for US to jump on board at this point and start owning a large enough percentage of it to have any kind of control. Keep in mind that US neither has the cheapest electricity nor access to ASIC production (the factory is in China).

The US does not have the cheapest electricity, but they have the money printer. Price is not a concern to the government, especially when it comes to war. The fiat system is built in such a way that it incentivizes spending as quickly as possible, which is the opposite of Bitcoin. Fiat was created to fund war, and as long as the money can be spent before it affects the market, those who print the money can buy whatever they want for the current market prices.

Quote
ďIt is no coincidence that when recounting the most horrific tyrants of
history, one finds that every single one of them operated a system of
government-issued money which was constantly inflated to finance
government operation. There is a very good reason that Vladimir Lenin,
Joseph Stalin, Mao Ze Dong, Adolf Hitler, Maximilien Robespierre, Pol
Pot, Benito Mussolini, Kim Jong Il, and many other notorious criminals all
ruled in periods of unsound government-issued money which they could
print at will to finance their genocidal and totalitarian megalomania. It is the
same reason that the same societies which birthed these mass murderers did
not produce anyone close to their level of criminality when living under
sound monetary systems which required governments to tax before they
spent.

None of these monsters ever repealed sound money in order to fund
their mass murder. The destruction of sound money had come before, hailed
with wonderful feel-good stories involving children, education, worker
liberation, and national pride. But once sound money was destroyed, it
became very easy for these criminals to take over power and take command
of all of their society's resources by increasing the supply of unsound
money


- The Bitcoin Standard, Saifedean Ammous

3  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 28, 2022, 06:11:19 PM
Gigi argues that Bitcoin is speech because we can roll some dice or flip a coin to get our private key. We can then convert that key into a secret ďphraseĒ. So creating and writing down the private key is speech. To make this action illegal is essentially restricting our freedom of speech and thought.

It's a stupid argument for a few reasons. First, Bitcoin is not just a private key, it's the whole software and the network. And a ban on Bitcoin wouldn't look like a ban on running software, no one will bother with enforcing that, instead Bitcoin-related operations will be banned - exchanging it for fiat, using it as a payment method, etc. If these bans are enforced, then Bitcoin would be nothing more than a record in a database with no utility.

And second, this is just a version of the reductive argument that information is just a number and you can't outlaw a number.

Maybe you will find this article interesting. Gigi can explain it a lot better than I can:

https://dergigi.com/2021/08/02/implications-of-outlawing-bitcoin/
4  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 28, 2022, 04:33:04 PM
There is an ongoing battle on Bitcoin Twitter about whether Bitcoin should be considered a weapon (and protected by the Second Amendment in the US) or speech (and protected by the First Amendment in the US).

Bitcoin could be whatever depending on how it's used by its owner. And IMO forcing Bitcoin to be either weapon or speech to get protection by 1st/2nd amendment is ridiculous.

I agree with this wholeheartedly. As an American, I donít really care what the Constitution says. However, people in this country view it as a religious document, and believe everything must fall into one of its categories. The Ninth Amendment is the only one that matters to me, but it is ignored by all institutions.


I do believe Bitcoin falls under speech because we have a 12 word seed phrase that gives us access to our property.

If you're going to force Bitcoin as speech, at least make better argument. For example, Bitcoin is used by citizen to perform freedom by speech by utilizing OP_RETURN.


That makes no sense at all. Why force bitcoin into a category that it doesn't fit into?
To be honest the whole discussion on twitter seems to be among idiots who either don't understand what "weapon" or "speech" means or they are pursing a different purpose that can only be known if we know a little background of the people who started this fake discussion.

This was so funny Cheesy

In the US, speech means much more than having the freedom to say things. It can be ideas, art, actions, etc. A political cartoon is speech like sticking up your middle finger to a politician.

Gigi argues that Bitcoin is speech because we can roll some dice or flip a coin to get our private key. We can then convert that key into a secret ďphraseĒ. So creating and writing down the private key is speech. To make this action illegal is essentially restricting our freedom of speech and thought.

Jason Lowery, who works for the US military, argues that miners are at digital war against each other based on first principles of bacteria fighting for natural selection. He has build an entire philosophy on the idea that mining is a non-lethal means of warfare called ďsoft-warĒ that can replace a majority of ďhard-warĒ that involves physical bodies. Itís a noble idea on the surface, but he builds on this analogy to say mining could be a weapon of mass mutual destruction, and itís in the interest of the US government to protect mining, rather than ban it. He uses the Second Amendment to explain why the government cannot forbid us from Bitcoin or mining, but this worries me because US citizens are not permitted to possess the same weapons that the government possesses (WMDs).

So none of this is about banning Bitcoin. It seems worse to me. Instead, I feel like the government wants to seize the means of Bitcoin production (mining) and start a digital war with other countries to have the biggest hash rate. This would mean individuals could no longer compete with mining.
5  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 27, 2022, 11:17:24 PM
The legal precedent is that encryption is a munition in the United States, and therefore protected by the Second Amendment.

Don't confuse people here, there is no such precedent.

Bitcoin is a digital currency. It's not a weapon, it's not a free speech mechanism. There's absolutely no way that any court would deem that Bitcoin is protected within the First or the Second amendment. If the US government has a precedent of seizing gold, why would it recognize the right to own Bitcoin as a part of the Constitution?

I donít mean to confuse anyone. This is not my analysis. The weapon position is from someone named Jason Lowery who works for the US Space Force. I do believe Bitcoin falls under speech because we have a 12 word seed phrase that gives us access to our property. Nobody can say we are not allowed to keep those 12 words in our head, speak those words, or write them down.

I really don't understand why people suddenly treat bitcoin like this, there is so much legality that makes bitcoiners more confuse.

In the beginning it was just that simple, you have your mnemonic phrase, and private keys then it's yours. We don't need to be like debating whether it is considered as a weapon or speech and what legal precedence is covered or not.

Bitcoin is for everyone, simple as that, this people just make it more complicated.

I agree that we donít need to be debating these things, but there are officials in the US military who are bringing up this debate.

I donít care what the precedence of anything is. The government still classifies tomatoes as a vegetable for tax purposes. I donít trust the government. But I have serious concerns about this, because Jason has implied mining is a weapon of mass mutual destruction. Of course he says itís ďnon-lethalĒ and claims to love Bitcoin and want it to advance, but Iím very uncomfortable with this idea.
6  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 27, 2022, 09:55:42 PM
The legal precedent is that encryption is a munition in the United States, and therefore protected by the Second Amendment.

Don't confuse people here, there is no such precedent.

Bitcoin is a digital currency. It's not a weapon, it's not a free speech mechanism. There's absolutely no way that any court would deem that Bitcoin is protected within the First or the Second amendment. If the US government has a precedent of seizing gold, why would it recognize the right to own Bitcoin as a part of the Constitution?

Snipped

Despite all the rough and hard times bitcoin had suffered from US i can tell you vividly that US is still one of the countries with the highest numbers of bitcoiners in the world, yet it government attacking to regulate the currency, but your comparison here is what may be confusing because I don't see any correlation between bitcoin and speech, if bitcoin had been considering all manners of speeches against it maybe it could have been nowhere today, everyone has the freedom of speech while bitcoin remains unltared by any level of human speech levied against it.

I donít mean to confuse anyone. This is not my analysis. The weapon position is from someone named Jason Lowery who works for the US Space Force. I do believe Bitcoin falls under speech because we have a 12 word seed phrase that gives us access to our property. Nobody can say we are not allowed to keep those 12 words in our head, speak those words, or write them down.
7  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Poll: Is Bitcoin a weapon or speech? on: November 27, 2022, 07:41:23 AM
There is an ongoing battle on Bitcoin Twitter about whether Bitcoin should be considered a weapon (and protected by the Second Amendment in the US) or speech (and protected by the First Amendment in the US).

The legal precedent is that encryption is a munition in the United States, and therefore protected by the Second Amendment. During the Crypto Wars of the 90ís, cypherpunk Adam Back made a ridicule of this by creating a t-shirt with an RSA-encrypted message on the back, making it illegal to export or show this shirt to non-US citizen.

EDIT

I personally donít care what Bitcoin is called. However, there are people in the US government trying to legally classify Bitcoin as a weapon. That is why this conversation is important. To me, Bitcoin is property, and nobody has the right to take your property. Unfortunately in the US, property is irrelevant because politicians have interpreted the Commerce Clause of the Constitution to mean they can regulate absolutely any "substance" in existence.
8  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule is a GUI to timelock your BTC, and allows you to change your mind on: November 26, 2022, 10:50:15 AM
I have added directions to build BTCapsule from the Python code on my GitHub. There are a few dependencies that people might have trouble with, so hopefully that makes it easier.

Also, there is a neat app on Android called testnet wallet that lets you send and receive testnet coins. You can use it to scan the QR code generated by BTCapsule to easily send coins to the P2SH address.
9  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule can timelock your bitcoin, while giving you full access to your coins on: November 24, 2022, 05:47:52 AM
Iím wondering if anyone has tried out BTCapsule. I would love to hear any feedback/criticism. Thank you.
Can this be tried and tested with Bitcoin testnet or only with mainnet coins?
I would be interested in testing how everything works with testnet coins first, but I can't promise anything right now...because life stuff have priority.
My suggestion is to first ask for code review from known bitcoin developers, and maybe record demo video showing how everything works for you.

I think a video is a great idea. I will try to work on one soon.

Right now, the testnet version is the only option Iíve made available (unless you build it from the Python code). I donít want to release the mainnet version until Iím sure everything is working as it should. Iíve tried to mess things up and catch any bugs, but a fresh set of eyes would be very helpful.
10  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Buy Bitcoin before the banks and governments do on: November 23, 2022, 09:04:41 AM
Alike with the idea of centralization? that won't be as easy as that. If ever governments are about to buy Bitcoin, then they would be investors, which makes it impossible. Their only goal is to tax transactions which are more likely through third party wallets, apps, or even exchangers. Governments who'd buy cryptocurrencies will be in huge loss and the point of doing so is just weird. Unstable market value, decentralized nature; being untaxable if by direct transactions,; which are characteristics they won't like, I guess. To countries wherein cryptocurrencies are being widely used, they did not need doing such thing to adapt this technology.

I think governments would buy Bitcoin for the same reasons they hoard gold. While they cannot control the network, they can manipulate the price if they buy massive amounts of Bitcoin and then sell it. While those of us who HODL and believe in Bitcoin as a means of freedom will be undeterred, it can cause panic and make a CBDC look appealing to those who donít understand what Bitcoin really is.
11  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Buy Bitcoin before the banks and governments do on: November 23, 2022, 08:15:39 AM
Quote
"The root problem with conventional currency is all the trust thatís required to make it work. The central bank must be trusted not to debase the currency, but the history of fiat currencies is full of breaches of that trust.

Banks must be trusted to hold our money and transfer it electronically, but they lend it out in waves of credit bubbles with barely a fraction in reserve. We have to trust them with our privacy, trust them not to let identity thieves drain our accounts." - Satoshi Nakamoto


https://www.politico.com/newsletters/digital-future-daily/2022/11/22/harvard-paper-to-central-banks-buy-bitcoin-00070552
12  Economy / Exchanges / Re: Will there ever be any safe centralised exchange ? on: November 23, 2022, 04:30:45 AM
You can usually trust exchanges to sell you Bitcoin, but never trust them to hold it. The exchanges have become the banks, and distrust of the banks is why Satoshi created Bitcoin.


Quote
"The root problem with conventional currency is all the trust thatís required to make it work. The central bank must be trusted not to debase the currency, but the history of fiat currencies is full of breaches of that trust.

Banks must be trusted to hold our money and transfer it electronically, but they lend it out in waves of credit bubbles with barely a fraction in reserve. We have to trust them with our privacy, trust them not to let identity thieves drain our accounts." - Satoshi Nakamoto
13  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule can timelock your bitcoin, while giving you full access to your coins on: November 23, 2022, 04:08:19 AM
Windows Defender may flag BTCapsule because it was made with PyInstaller. I do not have $500 for a signed-certificate right now. When you generate an address, Google "Bitcoin testnet faucet" and have coins sent to the generated P2SH address.
This is fine because windows defender is not very smart piece of software and it false flags a bunch of things.
Everything should be fine as long as the source code matches with windows version of BTCapsule and if this can be verified.
I would suggest everyone to switch to Linux OS anyway.

Yes, Linux all the way. IĎve been using Windows because I wanted to make an .exe, and itís been a nightmare. I finally got the hang of it, but Iím ready to develop on Linux again. Here is a tutorial to decompile the source code if anyone is interestedÖ

https://stackoverflow.com/a/68492985

Thank you! I'll have to remind myself to come to test it out myself, as mentioned, one of the things on my mind (even if on the backburner) is to really work out how to pass my things on, and at the same time work out a way to make it legible to the receiver. The part on fees concerns me at the moment, impossible to foresee what the network and price would look like in 5 years, never mind decades.

I am running out to a client site (Yeah...working on a Saturday) but from the tl;dr it looks like from what you are saying on the website that you are generating a raw TX to be transmitted.

I tested for a bit and found out clicking "Generate" button multiple times caused multiple address/private key shown on text box without separator. You might want to change the behavior.

Iím wondering if anyone has tried out BTCapsule. I would love to hear any feedback/criticism. Thank you.
14  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What feature of Bitcoin do you think is most difficult to understand? on: November 22, 2022, 12:33:14 PM
Private keys are what allow you to spend bitcoin. It is randomly generated with an encryption algorithm called SHA256. Basically, itís a long string that is so long and random, there are enough private keys available for everyone millions of times over.

There are few major error,
1. Private key usually is generated with secure random number generator. Some people refer it as CSPRNG/CRNG.
2. SHA-256 is hashing algorithm, not encryption algorithm.

P2PKH is a type of address called a "legacy address" because itís oldest Bitcoin address. Itís larger (more bits) than the newer address types (P2WPKH or Bech32) so miner fees cost more but itís accepted by everyone on the Bitcoin network.

FYI, the oldest address type is P2PK (Pay to Public Key).


Thanks, I included your response at the bottom of my reply. I still get a bit confused over all the terms. I've been reading through Mastering Bitcoin, but it will take a while before everything sticks.
15  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / We canít vote our way to freedom, but we can build our way to freedom on: November 22, 2022, 11:44:31 AM
Bitcoin is an unstoppable force against the enslaving fiat system. This is why I own Bitcoin. But it makes me wonder; what else can we replace with a technology that is permissionless and immutable?

I have seen people trying to build apps that could replace politicians from deciding how our taxes are distributed, but perhaps they have the same centralized failures that DigiCash had before Bitcoin.

Maybe Bitcoin is all we really need. "Fix the money, fix the world".
16  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule can timelock your bitcoin, while giving you full access to your coins on: November 22, 2022, 10:26:42 AM
BTCapsule (testnet) is now available for Windows!

Windows Defender may flag BTCapsule because it was made with PyInstaller. I do not have $500 for a signed-certificate right now. When you generate an address, Google "Bitcoin testnet faucet" and have coins sent to the generated P2SH address.
17  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What feature of Bitcoin do you think is most difficult to understand? on: November 20, 2022, 03:18:01 PM


I have created a GUI for timelocking bitcoin. It allows you to easily timelock, while giving you full access to your coins at any time, just in case you change your mind.

You can read about itís development here:

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5420600.0
You should open source everything including the GUI (an easy to use html file that user can just double click to open) not just the class that does the underlying stuff. Something like what https://coinb.in/#newTimeLocked is doing which is completely open source and the user can see and download the source code to run it offline.
Otherwise entering the private key into a website is not secure for many reasons...

Iím not sure I understand what you mean. BTCapsule is 100% open-source and can be built with Python. It does not require the internet to do anything other than broadcast your redeem script on the Bitcoin network.

BTCapsule is different than coinb.in because it allows the creator of the transactions to redeem their bitcoin at anytime. Coinb.in creates a P2SH address that timelocks your coins and offers you one redeem script.

BTCapsule creates a P2SH address that timelocks your coins and offers you two redeem scripts. One redeem script must wait until the specific date to broadcast the transaction, and the other redeem script has a Locktime of 0 (actually itís 500000001 because that is the minimum for UNIX timelocks), so it can be redeemed at anytime.

The GUI is built using TKinter and you donít have to enter your private key. BTCapsule creates two paper wallets, and you just have to send funds to the generated P2SH address. Here is the source code:

https://github.com/BTCapsule/BTCapsule
18  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What feature of Bitcoin do you think is most difficult to understand? on: November 20, 2022, 05:06:12 AM
For example, Bitcoin has a timelock feature that can create a transaction that is impossible to spend until a certain date or block height is reached. You can do this using OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY, but it seems most people donít know how to use this feature or where to even begin.
Technically the problem is not about understanding the feature itself but with the lack of user friendly tool that allows you to use this feature. For example imagine a UI where it asks you to select a date from a calendar and set a time when creating a locked output. You don't need to understand how it works since it would make it user friendly.

That's kind of like spending bitcoin. You don't need to know what each part of that transaction is (version, locktime, outpoint, signature script, etc.) you just enter a destination address and an amount and click send because a user friendly UI exists.

I have created a GUI for timelocking bitcoin. It allows you to easily timelock, while giving you full access to your coins at any time, just in case you change your mind.

You can read about itís development here:

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5420600.0
19  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: BTCapsule can timelock your bitcoin, while giving you full access to your coins on: November 18, 2022, 09:04:21 PM
BTCapsule (testnet) is now available for Linux! Try it out and let me know what you think.

When you download BTCapsule, you will have to right-click the file, select "Properties>Permissions" and check the box that says "Allow executing file as program" (Ubuntu). When you generate an address, Google "Bitcoin testnet faucet" and have coins sent to the generated P2SH address.

https://btcapsule.com/download.html
20  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What feature of Bitcoin do you think is most difficult to understand? on: November 18, 2022, 02:00:06 AM
Well we all have our curiosity or what brought us in Bitcoin so I think we would first get used to that before learning more. Some can be investment, others try to get a decentralized financial system, some trading.
Mine was that Bitcoin is the future and I have to be part of it.

I have used Bitcoin in my business, my career and my daily financial activities. I have tried trading and got a hang over it but one aspect I still don't understand is the mining aspect of Bitcoin.

For me, it's the technical side of Bitcoin, like mining Bitcoin, the machine that uses to mine or how to set it up.

I donít really understand mining myself. From what I can see, itís very expensive to set up and continuously run, so thatís beyond anything I can attempt to do.


And addition the addresses or private keys with Bitcoin, which I always keep to see here on the Bitcoin forum from some users, some words like "derived", "keys", etc. And recently, I just discovered that there are different types of Bitcoin transactions, like P2PKH, P2SH, and OP_RETURN.
These are all new to me, and even though I am into coding, this is very difficult to understand for me.

Correction added at bottom

It can get very confusing. I donít think I can explain OP_RETURN any better than a Google search, but maybe I can help with addresses and private keys.

Private keys are what allow you to spend bitcoin. It is randomly generated with an encryption algorithm called SHA256. Basically, itís a long string that is so long and random, there are enough private keys available for everyone millions of times over.

Your public key is "derived" from your private key from an elliptic curve. Imagine a curve on a coordinate plane. That curve is created by your private key, and the points on that curve make up your public key. That public key is then compressed to create your public address (which is what you share with others to get paid).

P2PKH is a type of address called a "legacy address" because itís oldest Bitcoin address. Itís larger (more bits) than the newer address types (P2WPKH or Bech32) so miner fees cost more but itís accepted by everyone on the Bitcoin network.

P2WPKH or Bech32 is the newer address type that includes SegWit. Basically, itís a special address that is lower bits, so the block size doesnít fill up as quickly.

P2SH is a "scripting" address. It allows you to add things like nLocktime. In other words, itís a lets you code what conditions you want to pass before the transaction become valid.

Thatís probably the best way I can explain it in layman terms.

Private keys are what allow you to spend bitcoin. It is randomly generated with an encryption algorithm called SHA256. Basically, itís a long string that is so long and random, there are enough private keys available for everyone millions of times over.

There are few major error,
1. Private key usually is generated with secure random number generator. Some people refer it as CSPRNG/CRNG.
2. SHA-256 is hashing algorithm, not encryption algorithm.

P2PKH is a type of address called a "legacy address" because itís oldest Bitcoin address. Itís larger (more bits) than the newer address types (P2WPKH or Bech32) so miner fees cost more but itís accepted by everyone on the Bitcoin network.

FYI, the oldest address type is P2PK (Pay to Public Key).

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