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101  Other / Politics & Society / What does Yemen teach us about gun control? on: July 02, 2013, 11:25:03 PM
Yemen is apparently one of the freest, if not the freest, country where it comes to gun rights.  I found this video discussing the gun culture there.

I know very little about that part of the world and Yemen in particular.  I'm curious if anyone more familiar can tell me what effect the pervasiveness of weapons has on Yemeni society.  Do people there generally feel safer or freer because of the guns, as some advocates would predict?
102  Economy / Services / Re: WTB: Video editing on: June 25, 2013, 04:04:30 AM
No prob.
103  Economy / Services / Re: WTB: Video editing on: June 25, 2013, 04:00:07 AM
Allow me to recommend mccorvic.  I'm very satisfied with the work he's done for me in the past.
104  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Woman 26, bears child to 11 year old boy. on: June 16, 2013, 04:32:31 AM
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there is no commitment because they cant get pregnant
You do realize there's a precedent for male rape victims being sued for child support, right?

Anyways, I find your overall attitude sexist and disgusting.  If no one else, think about the baby.
105  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Where do you store most of your coins for long term storage? on: May 20, 2013, 02:45:13 AM
Part of my key is recorded multiple places, another part is memorized.  I use blockchain.info in "watch only" mode to keep track of my offline wallet.
106  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Primary and secondary education on: May 11, 2013, 10:16:33 PM
So what's your preference then?
107  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Primary and secondary education on: May 11, 2013, 09:31:36 PM
@hawkeye: Let me repeat this:
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If it helps, imagine you're a parent in a free society looking for a school to enroll your kids in.  What would you look for?

Frankly, we aren't going to have much of a discussion by just reiterating that free markets are good.  In addition, I'd like this discussion to also be open to people of other political persuasions.  How the overall system should be run and how an individual school should be run are two different questions, and I'd like to focus on the latter.
108  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Primary and secondary education on: May 11, 2013, 08:39:21 AM
Hm, it seems like offering that many activities at one school would be a little impractical.

But, I agree with you that letting the students direct some of their education is key.  I definitely think we need to focus more on independent study.  From what I've been hearing, some homeschoolers have had great success with more self-directed, independent studies.

What I envision is a general scaling down of education.  A school will basically consist of one responsible adult supervising a small group of kids as they study pretty much on their own at their own pace, with frequent class trips to places of interest in the local area.  I'd also like to see more of an effort to expose students to the "real world" at an earlier age, maybe having them organize community service efforts or something.
109  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Primary and secondary education on: May 11, 2013, 08:10:41 AM
I appreciate your perspective, but in the OP I tried to clarify that I would like people to please be more specific than "leave it to the market".

You talk about private schools.  How do you envision these schools working?  Would they have a similar philosophy to current schools, or something more radical?  Which subjects would be more emphasized, and which would be less?  Would the time spent in school be about the same?  More? Less?

If it helps, imagine you're a parent in a free society looking for a school to enroll your kids in.  What would you look for?
110  Other / Politics & Society / Primary and secondary education on: May 11, 2013, 06:37:52 AM
We have a thread for higher education, so I figured why not.

I'm just curious what people think is the best way to run an education system.  I know many people here are in favor of leaving it to the market, but I'd appreciate if you could be a little more specific, maybe say what you would choose for your own children.
111  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 11, 2013, 06:23:03 AM
A "Georgist" doesn't provide anything, just like an "anarchist" doesn't.  If you mean the surrounding community, chances are they're the real reason the land has value in the first place.  Remote land is worth very little, land located in developed communities is worth considerably more.  Granted, there's no reason to assume that every member of the community contributed equally.

I consider homesteading a completely arbitrary way of determining land ownership.  I recognize that in some ways considering land communal property is just as arbitrary, but when one conception of property rights leads to stratification and systemic poverty and the other doesn't, I'm inclined towards the one that doesn't.  Land ownership can be and is used to enable tyranny and injustice.  I don't see how that can be disputed.

I've already explained the differences between bitcoin and other land.  Currencies like bitcoin are not a zero-sum game.  No one is prevented from using bitcoin as a medium of exchange, or starting their own crypto-currency, and the wealth it can buy is always growing.
112  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 11, 2013, 05:15:52 AM
Meh, we've had this conversation many times.  No point in continuing if nothing new is added.
113  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 11, 2013, 03:45:19 AM
How much start-up capital do you think the average freedman had?  Even if by some miracle they could find someone to lend them the money, the question remains: what value did the landlord provide in exchange for the money that he's demanding?

You said the land would be fallow without the landlord.  I'm saying it could still be cultivated, possibly even by the same people.
114  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 11, 2013, 02:20:18 AM
Any property system is dependent on people accepting your rules.

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Fallow means unused. If the land was unused, then by definition, they're not using it.
Sometimes, people cultivate fallow land, and then it's not fallow any more.   Smiley  Lack of agricultural ability was not the reason sharecroppers were impoverished.
115  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 10, 2013, 10:36:18 PM
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And who decides what is and is not "within" the community? Can I tell my neighbor that he's now within my community, and therefore owes me rent on the land he owns?
A homesteading system has that problem as well.  Who decides where homesteading is the law of the land and where it isn't?

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No, if the land was fallow, they'd be doing nothing and keeping 100% of that - which is to say, nothing.
Why would they be doing nothing?  Is it impossible for them to till the soil without the blessings of a white-suited gentleman?
116  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 10, 2013, 10:14:11 PM
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More importantly, who is and isn't a part of the community for purposes of determining who owes a share of the rent.
Huh Whoever occupies land that's within the community.

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Bullshit. If you didn't exist, that land would just have lain fallow and unused. Nobody would have benefited from it. Land profits are made by providing people something that you created on that land.
Um, no someone else would have taken it.  Possibly your current tenants.

In what way were the sharecroppers in the post war south better off thanks to their landlords than they would have been if that land was fallow?  They'd still be doing the same work except they'd be able to keep their entire crop.
117  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 10, 2013, 09:32:33 PM
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Because georgism doesnt solve the aforementioned problem. If the same space belongs equally to more than one person how do we determine who gets to occupy that space if more than one person wishes to occupy that space? you are back to needing to invent a property rule to solve this problem.
The idea is the one who occupies the land rents it from those who don't.

ah ok then. who ever wrote that wikipedia article has a very different definition for the word ownership than i do.

In principal i quite like this idea. I would be lying if i said that i hadn't explored this line of reasoning myself. It matches with my idea of social justice more than homesteading. (obviously homesteading still applies 100% to things you actually create but its difficult to justify the ownership of 3d space on philosophical grounds)

and i should also add that this would probably work quite well in a small community where individuals could gather togather once a year and conduct some sort of ceremony where the money exchanged hands infront of everyone. So it would be like bitcoin in that way, everyone would be auditing everyone. But as your society becomes larger this would quickly become uneconomical. You would soon find yourself needing an agency to conduct this business. As soon as you did that you would face some serious principal agent problems.

If you could think of a way to allow georgism to work without the need of a central authority. A way where the redistribution could be handled in a distributed fashion, possibly with a technology similar in some ways to bitcoin, than i think i could definitely be convinced to prefer georgism to homesteading.

keep following this path there is a lot of merit to this idea but be very careful. If improperly implemented it would likely lead to the development of a state and it may very well be the case that there is no way to implement it with out leading to the development of a state.

*edit* oh also a better rule than renting from society would be buying from society. This would be just or unjust for the same reasons that georgism is just or unjust but it would lead to much better outcomes. Imagine a person rents a bit of land from society and builds a house on it then a year later he is outbid and he loses his house.
AnCap is an appealing idea, and I'm extremely open to it, but I take an "I'll believe it when I see it" attitude towards it for the time being.  I would say, though, that if it's possible to enforce traditional property rights without a state, I don't see why communal rights would be much different.  Anyways, there are anarchists who seem to think it's possible.

Actually, one tricky part I see would be determining who is and isn't a part of the community for purposes of determining who's owed a share of the rent.  I believe freedom of movement is an important one, and that there would be no such thing as citizenship in a free society.

"Buying from the community" would be a one time thing, and a short time later you're in the same situation you would have been without georgism, so it defeats the purpose.

To others: Land is distinct from capital.  Capital profits are made from creating things for others to use.  If you didn't exist, that capital would not have been made.  Land profits are made by selectively depriving people of something that existed before you were born. 

I actually have considered whether or not this applies to bitcoin, and ultimately I've concluded it doesn't.  Early investors helped bitcoin grow to where it is today, and miners help maintain the network, so in that sense it's created like capital.   Bitcoin is fungible, so holding bitcoin doesn't really deprive anyone of anything.  There is always the possibility of creating new cryptocurrencies.
118  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 10, 2013, 09:42:23 AM
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Because georgism doesnt solve the aforementioned problem. If the same space belongs equally to more than one person how do we determine who gets to occupy that space if more than one person wishes to occupy that space? you are back to needing to invent a property rule to solve this problem.
The idea is the one who occupies the land rents it from those who don't.  People still own land in a sense, but they pay a "land value tax" on it, which goes to compensate those who do not occupy as much or as valuable land.
119  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 09, 2013, 11:23:39 PM
So what makes homesteading a better rule than Georgism?
120  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Average Land Rent - Free Land for the average person. on: May 09, 2013, 11:05:40 PM
I just don't understand homesteading.  We start from the axiom that each individual owns himself, and therefore his labor, and therefore the products thereof.  This seems to lead clearly to the conclusion that land is  not ownable.

The homesteading idea would say if you "mix your labor with land" by mining 0.1% of an ore vein, you not only own the ore you mine, but also the 99.9% of the ore you didn't mine.  That makes no sense to me.  It's giving the someone control of not only the labor he's done there, but any future labor that's done there by anyone.
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