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141  Economy / Speculation / Re: Could the market cap be intentionally raised by a single party? on: February 04, 2013, 08:59:14 PM
I said why.  Twice.

If, as I suspect, the market cap can't necessarily grow as quickly as needed, that's a huge barrier to adoption by large institutions.
142  Economy / Speculation / Re: Could the market cap be intentionally raised by a single party? on: February 04, 2013, 08:18:01 PM
You know, I didn't think about it that way, but you might be right.  It could take less money, not more as I thought.

The question is whether or not it would be sustainable long enough for the other party to cash out.  In order for that to happen, the market has to follow the lead of the major purchaser and start buying at that volume and price.  I don't think that could be counted on to happen.
143  Economy / Speculation / Re: Could the market cap be intentionally raised by a single party? on: February 04, 2013, 07:45:03 PM
I'm just speaking in hypothetical here, so I can't tell you how much.  As I said, the scenario is if a major corporation or government wanted to conduct a multi-billion dollar transaction in bitcoin.
144  Economy / Speculation / Re: Could the market cap be intentionally raised by a single party? on: February 04, 2013, 07:36:56 PM
How would you go about it?

I wonder if it's possible to derive a formula to determine how much money you'd need to raise it by what percent...
145  Economy / Speculation / Could the market cap be intentionally raised by a single party? on: February 04, 2013, 07:04:19 PM
Say you were a government or major corporation that wanted to carry out a multi-billion dollar transaction in bitcoin.  Would it be possible to raise the market cap up to where it needs to be for you to do it?

The first thing I'd try would be to place a huge order, offering a large amount of money per bitcoin.  Say, $10,000 per coin.  You'd probably need to invest quite a bit more than you want to transact in keeping the price high.

This would raise the price to where you need it, but then the question is would it stay that high?  In addition, would the receiving party be able to cash out?  Obviously they can't just sell it back to you, or it would defeat the purpose of using bitcoin.  Could the market be counted on to pick up the slack once the original bid is withdrawn?
146  Other / Off-topic / Re: Islamic science comeback on: January 27, 2013, 06:17:56 AM
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Mandatory education has to be the biggest joke in human history I have ever seen, it is impossible to teach people who do not want to learn, the only thing they do learn is a quite healthy hatred for the system they were placed in against their will.
Not really.  If they learned that, then it would be much less of a waste of time than it is.
147  Other / Obsolete (selling) / Re: WTB SNES on: January 20, 2013, 11:40:29 PM
I've got one.  Message me if you want to work out details.
148  Economy / Services / Re: Web developer for hire. Flash, PHP, javascript, SQL and more on: January 14, 2013, 09:54:01 PM
PM sent.
149  Other / Politics & Society / Re: The Citadel community project in Idaho on: January 12, 2013, 09:18:11 AM
It looks interesting, but I'm kind of skeptical.  They seem wildly optimistic about their budget, it's difficult to find information on the people organizing it, and there's a large application fee.  That makes me concerned it might be a scam of some sort.  It seems like a cool idea, though.
150  Economy / Services / Re: Any Reliable VPS and Dedicated Server Provider for Bitcoins? on: January 11, 2013, 09:31:08 PM
I use http://www.bitvps.com/, and I've been pretty satisfied with them.
151  Economy / Services / Re: Web developer for hire. Flash, PHP, javascript, SQL and more on: January 10, 2013, 07:41:35 AM
Bumping for the new year.
152  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What online services would you pay for with bitcoin? on: January 07, 2013, 09:50:56 AM
I'd like to see more charities accept donations in bitcoin, or at least a trustworthy site that passes donations on.  I think there was something like this at one point, but I don't know what happened.

I also wish there were more legitimate investment opportunities.  I know I could lend to people on this forum, but I'm reluctant to risk large amounts of money without any means of enforcing the agreement.  Maybe a microloan company or something similar.

Online gaming is another possibility.
153  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Legality of prostitution and being homeless on: January 07, 2013, 08:57:06 AM
neptop- The terms you're using are kind of confusing.  I think when you talk about homelessness being illegal, you mean vagrancy.  They're not precisely the same thing.  You can be homeless without being a vagrant, for example if you stay at a shelter.

I think both prostitution and vagrancy should be legal.

Although, I do have to wonder.  For all the libertarians/anarchists, if you're a store owner and a vagrant outside your property is driving away customers through aggressive panhandling, is there any moral right to insist he leave?
154  Other / Politics & Society / Re: national minimum wage LAWS. good or bad? on: December 15, 2012, 05:35:18 AM
Yeah, I saw that.  Those are all mild variations of their base menu.  None of that stuff requires additional equipment or expertise.  You can ask for special orders in almost any restaurant.

It's strange, because I remember I never went there more than once or twice precisely because they refused to leave off certain ingredients.  Either that's changed, or my memory is faulty.
155  Other / Politics & Society / Re: national minimum wage LAWS. good or bad? on: December 15, 2012, 05:17:20 AM
You really like In-N-Out, don't you FirstAscent?  Smiley

They have a really limited menu.  Your choices are basically hamburger (with or without cheese), fries, and drink.  That probably saves them a lot of time and money.  They probably have a grill, a fryer, shake machine, and soda fountain.  At the McDonald's where I worked, we had all that plus multiple grills for different meats, an extra set of fryers for chicken products, a steamer, a cafe setup, a microwave for the cinnamon melts, a device for marinating the McRibs, a counterside fridge for salads, and probably more things I don't even remember.  Buying and maintaining all these things must cost quite a bit.

I'm not really sure what this has to do with minimum wage though.  Raising the minimum wage isn't necessarily going to cause more places to adopt In-N-Out's business plan.
156  Other / Off-topic / Re: Gun free zone on: December 15, 2012, 04:27:04 AM



In some schools they do have airport style security.  I can't imagine it does wonders for creating a welcoming learning environment.
157  Economy / Services / Re: Web developer for hire. Flash, PHP, javascript, SQL and more on: December 14, 2012, 06:11:03 AM
Ready to start looking for work again after an absence.
158  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Georgism/Geoism and the Land Value Tax on: December 13, 2012, 05:54:52 AM
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Except to live rent-free, you just have to buy your own land. To live tax-free, you must move to Somalia, and not paying rent will only get you evicted. Might land you an overnight stay in county, if you're belligerent about leaving, but that's in the current system, isn't it? And at any rate you get locked up for taking a swing at a cop or some such, not for not paying the rent.
You need to judge the nature of the act itself, not the circumstances of its victim.  Is stabbing someone who has good health insurance less of a crime than stabbing someone who doesn't?

If the evicted tenant has an alternative place to work or live, that's not because of anything the landlord did.  If the tenant does not have another place, the landlord would consider it not-his-problem.  Therefore, it's not the government's problem if you don't have anywhere to go.  Why is it the government's fault you don't want to go to Somalia?

Besides, buying land isn't living rent-free.  At best, it's paying your rent in one lump sum (and possibly later collecting some from innocent third parties).  More often it means you're making a bank your landlord.

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Just that? No heated debates? No argumentation? No meaningless myrkulistic memes? No nuanced discussion? Fair enough, I suppose.
Heh, well you seem to be a single-issue voter.  You obviously know much more about ecology than I do, so I just have to take your word concerning the environmental implications.
159  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Georgism/Geoism and the Land Value Tax on: December 13, 2012, 03:27:25 AM
It's more like "Pay us, or leave, or we'll toss you in a cage or kill you." for both of them.
160  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Georgism/Geoism and the Land Value Tax on: December 13, 2012, 03:16:04 AM
@myrkul - No, I don't see it, and I didn't the last five times you said it either.  Smiley  As far as I'm concerned, one mandate to use force in imposing one's will over those inhabiting a certain area of land is like another.  Maybe you should continue to repeat the same points without adding anything new.  Tongue

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I apologize for my use of the word 'collection', either that was too broad or not what I meant. I'm less worried about the actually payment of the tax than I am determining who owes what and why they owe that specific amount. Many states already have a property tax, how does that compare? (To be honest, I don't know how property taxes are calculated, either.)
As I understand it, property tax includes the value of improvements made to the land.  If you build a house on an empty lot, you're suddenly going to be paying a lot more in taxes than you were.  This goes against both the philosophical and practical goals of Georgism.

A few places have a land value tax, and generally it works out pretty well, but generally it's only a small portion of the rent the owners can collect, so it's only a partial solution to the problem.

Yeah, I still can't tell you exactly how it would be done, but it would have to be based on demand for that particular land and not include the value of improvements.  The practical goal is to create an incentive to use land to its fullest productivity, so ideally it should be high enough to price out inefficient users, low enough that it's still profitable for its best use.
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