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401  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Any other Americans considering a claim against the FBI over SilkRoad? on: December 05, 2013, 09:20:26 PM
The FBI moved the coins.  Either they brute forced the wallet password, timed the arrest when the wallet as unlocked, or DPR gave up the password.  Either way they coins have been sent to private keys controlled by the government.  The block chain is proof of that.  Can't move coins you don't have the private key for.

They've moved the coins that were deposited into the server pool addresses, because that wallet.dat was probably on the server itself.  Last that I heard, the address that the feds assume was the private wallet of DPR had not been moved; and if it had it would be more likely to be proof that they have a fallguy, and that DPR just moved them to make that point clear.  It's hard to access the Internet securely from a jail cell.
Depending on the jail, it's not that hard to get a smartphone with a data plan in, specially if you're loaded.
He's been in a Federal holding jail for most of the time, and the Gmen have been watching him like a hawk for this exact reason.
402  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Bitcoin "bumper sticker" mottos on: December 05, 2013, 09:15:45 PM
Let's start a thread for Bitcoin related mottos that one might see on a bumper sticker.  Short and to the point.  Anything that you put here is going to be free to use by anyone who actually does print bumber stickers.  So keep that in mind if you are into keeping your ideas for your personal profit.

I'll start....

Bitcoin: The Revolution Will Not Be Centralized!
403  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: [OVER] Riddles - Second edition - Solve them and harvest the loot! on: December 05, 2013, 06:58:02 PM
Okay, so what was the solution?
404  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Any other Americans considering a claim against the FBI over SilkRoad? on: December 05, 2013, 06:55:06 PM
The FBI moved the coins.  Either they brute forced the wallet password, timed the arrest when the wallet as unlocked, or DPR gave up the password.  Either way they coins have been sent to private keys controlled by the government.  The block chain is proof of that.  Can't move coins you don't have the private key for.

They've moved the coins that were deposited into the server pool addresses, because that wallet.dat was probably on the server itself.  Last that I heard, the address that the feds assume was the private wallet of DPR had not been moved; and if it had it would be more likely to be proof that they have a fallguy, and that DPR just moved them to make that point clear.  It's hard to access the Internet securely from a jail cell.
405  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 05, 2013, 06:51:16 PM

Ahh. Thanks for the background on Atlas. How ironic then that this post has become iconic.

Atlas was a child with a great mind.  He will be truly great one day, but while he was here he mostly aggravated everyone with his inmature worldview and narrow ideology.  He needs to grow up some, but I have no doubt that he has enough of his own bitcoins that he many never want for anything.
406  Other / Beginners & Help / Re: Buying bitcoin is a pain. on: December 05, 2013, 12:33:49 AM
If I want to buy some bitcoin I have to get verified first and link a bank account. It is @#%^ing ridiculous.
If I ever buy bitcoin it will have to be in-person with someone who has them. Selling is the same deal.

Will we ever be able to buy and sell bitcoin easily?

Have you tried localbitcoins.com?
407  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What does the bible say about Bitcoin? on: December 04, 2013, 07:10:12 PM
This thread made me realise...
What if the common American discovers bitcoin (i.e. god fearing hypocrites)
Wouldn't they be strongly against it? As it's "un-American"... Fox news will tell them bitcoin is communist or something.

I think that the situation will eventually require some whale to donate some btc to church/media/politicians to let them discover the happiness of watching them growth. It should work great  Smiley


There are already a couple of churches and missions that accept bitcoin donations.  Google is your friend.
408  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: WHO has the power and how can changes to bitcoin be effected? on: December 04, 2013, 06:26:52 AM
We are the people who have the power to make changes, that power is derived by our choice to run bitcoin clients of a version that we agree with and optionally mine with them.

Neil

ok so it is the miners that have the major control?

If mining goes industrial which seems to be the trend due to cost of equipment and massive increase in difficulty levels the time could come when 90% of mining is in the hands of a select and well capitalized few..does that make sense?

Yes, it does.  It's expected.

Quote

At that point they are effectively in control of bitcoin and can opt to change without discussion simply by all agreeing to run a new version that suits them. Would that be correct?


Yes and no.  Yes they could do it, no it wouldn't be bitcoin anymore.  That would be a 'breaking' change.  Bitcoins would functionally cease to exist.  The price would collapse, and it should.

Quote
Could they change to a version that allows the probable lost wallet coins ( currently estimated at 463,000 coins) to be cancelled and 50% re mined and 50% placed in escrow for future claims on those coins? Or would that be impossible?

Nothing is ever impossible, but it would still be astronomically unlikely.

Quote

Yes I agree its too early to consolidate lost coins Can it actually be done even if we wanted to? ( 10 -15yrs seems reasonable ..if ever it can be done)  but the issue can be discussed with potential solutions

If ther i s aflaw discovered in the address keypari algos, then everyone using bitcoin would migrate to a new address format with a new algo.  Whatever was left after some transitional period would be assumed to be lost coins, and thus salvage.  Perhaps such a flaw could be exploited to permit breaking of the addresses, but that is unlikley.  Such as it is, those lost coins will remain lost for well beyond our natural lifetimes.
409  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 06:17:22 AM
I also get the feeling that the intellectual level on this forum is somewhat above average.

Once upon a time, the same thing could have been said about the Internet at large.

how many years we going back here 50 ?



Pre-1993
410  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 06:03:56 AM
I also get the feeling that the intellectual level on this forum is somewhat above average.

Once upon a time, the same thing could have been said about the Internet at large.
411  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Announcements (Altcoins) / Re: [ANN] [QRK] Quark | Super secure hashing | CPU mining on: December 04, 2013, 05:22:05 AM
Just a couple questions...

1) with a target block interval of only 30 seconds, aren't block orphaned at a high rate?

2) how can cpu mining be guaranteed?

3) what is the advantage that Quark has that those in this thread consider to be deficient in Bitcoin?

Seriously, I don't understand the attraction.

1) at the beginning that was a problem, now not anymore.


Okay, how was this problem solved?

Quote
2) No one can guarantee anything. Since when do cryptocurrencies or any software whatsoever come with a guarantee?

Who knows what kind of computers will exist in even 10 years. With a little bad luck those future computers can do all bitcoin
mining within a day, and make bitcoins very obsolete...

  Okay, not guarantee.  What about Quark makes mining with GPUs or Asics difficult?

Quote

3) The money master Bill Still is behind it, and it has the same name like the most likeable figure in StarTrek Deepspace nine.
No, just kidding. I suppose that remains to be seen, they say it has many different hashing algorithms put together and not just one, like bitcoin.
But does this logic equate more security?
If I put 6 different locks on my door, is it more secure? Not really... there are other factors.


Bitcoin has the ability to use two different hashing algos right now, but just uses one twice.  This kind of thing coudl be spliced onto Bitcoin without stopping the running network, I'm just curious as to the merits of such a thing.  As you noted, there is a case of deminishing returns with adding extra locks onto the same door.
412  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Announcements (Altcoins) / Re: [ANN] [QRK] Quark | Super secure hashing | CPU mining on: December 04, 2013, 05:04:11 AM
Just a couple questions...

1) with a target block interval of only 30 seconds, aren't block orphaned at a high rate?

2) how can cpu mining be guaranteed?

3) what is the advantage that Quark has that those in this thread consider to be deficient in Bitcoin?

Seriously, I don't understand the attraction.
413  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 04:35:20 AM
Well, I agree with you, and I agree that it is settled, but that doesn't make it any less debated in my experience.

I like this discussion, I haven't been debating libertarianism for quite a while, and I have a feeling that there are quite a few libertarians gravitating towards cryptocurrencies.

We were the first through the door!  Of the first 1000 or so forum members here, roughly four were NOT of the libertarian persuasion.  The political debates at the time were between flavors of libertarianism.  Of course, that all changed as the popularity of Bitcoin (and thus the membership here) exploded, but it was nice having a safe haven while it lasted.
414  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Any other Americans considering a claim against the FBI over SilkRoad? on: December 04, 2013, 04:27:39 AM
Not sure how well it would go over for Americans, however I wonder if it is possible for people from other countries to do so? For example, if you were buying drugs in a country that doesn't prohibit said drugs, and the U.S seized your funds, would you not have a claim?

I think that you would, but IANAL.
415  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Any other Americans considering a claim against the FBI over SilkRoad? on: December 04, 2013, 04:26:54 AM
If you succeed the court would return the wrongly frozen assets back to you.  I don't think I have to point out how much of an uphill battle that will be and how much the three letter agencies will turn over every aspect of your life to see if there is fire where there is smoke but it is your right as part of due diligence. 

Well, I never bought anything on that site, but I sure wouldn't relish the thought of the FBI, ATF etc up my business for a mere $30K; but I strongly suspect that number is going to continue to rise. 
416  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 04:18:56 AM
No, unless the slaves voluntarily sold themselves to slavedom,

I'm sure that you have to realize on an intellectual level that this statement is impossible.  Even the S&M sex slaves aren't really slaves, they're just play-acting.  You cannot 'sell yourself' beyond a limited term and under very limited conditions, thus nothing like chattel slavery at all.  Even those same S&M sex slaves have that 'safe word' that makes it all stop.

Yes I know, By selling yourself as a slave you give up the freedom that you as a libertarian claim cannot be given up, and so on, hence the back door, which actually just makes it a long term employment.


No, I think you misunderstand the point.  The core right of mankind is the right to life.  If I own myself, which I obviously do, I own my life.  If I truly own anything, that means I have the right to destroy that thing.  I have the right to destroy myself, and I can actually sell the right to destroy myself to another.  However, if I were to sell myself to a human-hunter for sport, and he fails to follow through, he's also 'quit' his claim and, by reason of my own continuing to exist, have immediately homesteading my corporeal body once again.  It's not the selling of self in the moment that's impossible, it's the ongoing arrangement that is impossible, because I can change my mind at any time.  And if I can change my mind and walk off the chain gang, then it's not really slavery, is it?

Quote
Selling yourself to slavery and selling your own organs is usually some of the most debated questions in the libertarian community.

Not in my experience.  Both issues seem pretty well settled.  The first isn't prohibited in any way, it's just impossible to sustain; and the second is obvious.  If I own myself, which I obviously do, and I have the right to destroy myself, which I do, then I have a right to part myself out.  The tricky part is proving after the fact that it was an agreement I freely entered into without coercion.  If I'm only selling one kidney for a very large sum of money, and am still alive after the fact to assert that my kidney wasn't stolen from me, then I shoudl be able to sell that kidney; and I should be able to buy one in like manner.  However, selling all my parts is tricker, since it becomes less obvious that I actually gained anything. ; but I can think of a scenerio or two where even that would make sense.  Say, for example, I had an inoperable brain tumor, but my heart was in excellent shape.  My own doctors gave me six months to live.  Then some really rich guy comes and offers to pay my next of kin an ungodly sum of money for my heart, because he has a teenaged son who needs a heart transplant in the next 3 months and I'm a match.  IF I coudl verify that my own bills woudl be paid, and a fund set up for my kids to go to college, such a trade woudl be rational as long as I truly believed (and had not been decieved) that my own life was short.
417  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 04:00:21 AM
No I am serving as a lieutenant in the Royal Swedish Marines Home Guard.
And as a board member of the local chapter of the Swedish Federation for Voluntary Defence Education and Training.
And we have no troops nor have we had any in Iraq.

Ah, a state sanctioned militia.  That makes sense, actually.
418  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: What does the bible say about Bitcoin? on: December 04, 2013, 03:57:56 AM
Quote from: Rev 13:16 NIV
16 It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads, 17 so that they could not buy or sell unless they had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of its name.
Keeping people from buying and selling was nearly impossible in Bible days, but we see it now with Visa, Mastercard and PayPal blocking whoever they don't like.

I've got to say, you're stretching the limits of imagination trying to squeeze that conclusion out of that verse.
419  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 03:54:23 AM
No, unless the slaves voluntarily sold themselves to slavedom,

I'm sure that you have to realize on an intellectual level that this statement is impossible.  Even the S&M sex slaves aren't really slaves, they're just play-acting.  You cannot 'sell yourself' beyond a limited term and under very limited conditions, thus nothing like chattel slavery at all.  Even those same S&M sex slaves have that 'safe word' that makes it all stop.
420  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: I am pretty confident we are the new wealthy elite, gentlemen. on: December 04, 2013, 03:50:27 AM
But I have chosen to try to change from within, working politically and voluntarily serving in the armed forces on my spare time rather than refusing to pay taxes..

Wait, what?  Are you serving in the National Guard and donating your service pay to the Iraqi Orphans' Fund or what?
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