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1  Other / Off-topic / Re: satoshi@vistomail.com signed by Craig Wright on: December 01, 2023, 12:27:53 AM
It's yet another fake.

Anyone can create a key with any name or email address they want on it.

Someone created a key here, they typed "satoshi@vistomail.com". It is not Satoshi's key, the name and email address are just entered by the user and not validated.

Then they signed a message that says "I created Bitcoin, I am Satoshi Nakamoto - Craig Wright" -- that's what the BEGIN PGP MESSAGE part decodes to.

Because they're incompetent with PGP they didn't use the clearsign option, so you have to decode the message to see the text being signed which is probably contributing to confusion.

thank you
2  Other / Off-topic / Re: satoshi@vistomail.com signed by Craig Wright on: November 30, 2023, 11:48:11 PM
What is the point of this?
What does this possibly have to do with Craig Wright?
3  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / When was the bitcoin white paper first published on bitcoin dot org ? on: September 25, 2023, 03:21:54 AM
When was the bitcoin white paper first published on bitcoin dot org ?
Was it published elsewhere also?
4  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Trying to match an address to a seed. on: November 22, 2021, 05:44:51 AM
If the OP's friend knows their passphrase is one of a dozen or so possibilities, the setup/reading the documentation for something like btcrecover may take longer than using iancoleman's tool.

It is the proper way to do it, though. If they don't know the passphrase, they can't be really trying a different password each time, even for a dozen of times. Let alone if the password is a long one which increases the odds of having few characters forgotten.

You'll most likely end up on brute forcing with btcrecover, so why not just do it in the first place?
Thanks I have finally convinced my friend to try btcrecover. She is a bit nervous and not very technical (neither am I).
I'm on windows and downloaded and extracted the files, but after that I'm not sure what to do.  Any suggestions anyone?

I looked here but felt a bit out of my depth when it mentioned "Install Python".   I'm not great technically but better than my friend so want to help them as its worth a bit now. https://btcrecover.readthedocs.io/en/latest/INSTALL/
5  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / A sha256 digest and a private key on: October 29, 2021, 11:53:59 PM
If I generate a sha256 digest from some text I get one string of letters and numbers, but if I generate a key pair using bitaddress, using the same text I get a private key.
What is the relationship between the digest and the private key?

Also I thought (and I'm probably wrong) that putting some text through the Sha256 algorithm produced a 256 character string of ones and zeroes.  If that correct. If so how do we them get the digest?

Thanks for your help in understanding this
6  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Trying to match an address to a seed. on: October 27, 2021, 09:28:42 AM
I don't know the complete story, but i'm assuming he/she has a native segwit address (starting with bc).
He/She probably needs to change the derivation path to BIP84 (on iancoleman's site)...

Thank you and thank you for all the other replies. My friend thinks they can narrow down the passphrase a lot and so this may work, but I have suggested to them if they don't find it quickly they use Btcrecover.
7  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Trying to match an address to a seed. on: October 27, 2021, 06:51:37 AM
To cut a long story short my friend lost a passphrase for a ledger wallet.
So following the advice of some helpful people here I asked them to use iancoleman.io to try the 24 word see combined with some possible passphrases and compare the addresses.
 However her address begins with a "b", and Iancolman.io doesn't seem to give addresses in that format.
Can anyone suggest a solution?
Thanks
8  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Searching for early transactions on the blockchain on: August 23, 2021, 12:33:59 AM
Thank you everyone who replied.
9  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Searching for early transactions on the blockchain on: August 22, 2021, 05:36:23 AM
What would be the easiest or best way to search the block chain for in formation about the earliest transactions?
10  Bitcoin / Hardware wallets / Re: Ledger wallet help please on: June 08, 2021, 10:28:53 AM


When trying to drill his password he must use  iancoleman rather then Ledger itself and definitely he must do it on offline computer.

His SEED ==> BIP39 Mnemonic
His passphrase ==> BIP39 Passphrase (optional)

Thank you!
11  Bitcoin / Hardware wallets / Re: Ledger wallet help please on: June 08, 2021, 06:57:33 AM
So I have friend who had some bitcoin stored with a ledger wallet. They used the function where you have a dummy wallet in case someone gets access. They still have their 24 words but the real wallet copntaing the bitcoin was also behind a pin number and a password , I think.
So when they tried to access the bitcoin they only were able to access the dummy wallet. They cannot remember the password.

Will they still be able to use the seed words in another wallet with the same derivation path, even if they also used a password?
Or will they need to remember the password too?

Thanks



The set of private keys created in Ledger from SEED + password is different from that one derived from the bare SEED. So to access his fund in another BIP39 compatible wallet your friend needs both things i.e. SEED and his used password, the single SEED will not help him. He cold try offline iancoleman.io/bip39/ tool to find his password.

Thanks for this. And thank you to everyone who helped. My friend thinks she can narrow down the passphrase but wants to establish what is the correct phrase before trying too many times in ledger.
So can we just use the iancoleman site to try different combinations?

If we can do this, do we just use the BIP39 part and do we enter the 24 words in the seed section or the Mnemonic section?

Can we enter these in and find the corresponding addresses?
She knows the address that has the bitcoin.

Thanks again
12  Bitcoin / Hardware wallets / Ledger wallet help please on: June 06, 2021, 01:31:19 AM
So I have friend who had some bitcoin stored with a ledger wallet. They used the function where you have a dummy wallet in case someone gets access. They still have their 24 words but the real wallet copntaing the bitcoin was also behind a pin number and a password , I think.
So when they tried to access the bitcoin they only were able to access the dummy wallet. They cannot remember the password.

Will they still be able to use the seed words in another wallet with the same derivation path, even if they also used a password?
Or will they need to remember the password too?

Thanks
13  Bitcoin / Electrum / Re: I lost my password to an electrum wallet on: November 01, 2020, 12:15:29 PM
Thank you for all the replies. I found quite few old seeds, but have not tested them all yet.
Does anyone know if there is another bitcoin wallet that uses the same derivation path as electrum?
14  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Announcements (Altcoins) / Help on: November 01, 2020, 09:49:55 AM
Help! Smiley
1.I have an old electrum wallet on a linux laptop
2. t is open
3. It has Stratis in it.
4. I have forgotten the password, so i cannot move the coins.
5. i don't think I have the seed

Can anyone help?

15  Bitcoin / Electrum / Re: I lost my password to an electrum wallet on: November 01, 2020, 09:34:31 AM
I just forgot the password for my wallet. I did not lose the seed
You mean the encrypted password? What's the problem with that if you do have the seed? You haven't lost your funds.

Ok.. I don't have the seed but may be able to find it.
16  Bitcoin / Electrum / Re: I lost my password to an electrum wallet on: November 01, 2020, 09:31:42 AM
Is there any tools to try to find it?

Let's clarify something first. Did you just forget the electrum password or did you lose the mnemonic seed for your wallet?  If you have a seed, you can restore your wallet from its seed phrase and choose a new password.


I just forgot the password for my wallet.
17  Bitcoin / Electrum / I lost my password to an electrum wallet on: November 01, 2020, 08:45:20 AM
Is there any tools to try to find it?
I am pretty sure I know the words I would have used but can't remember the combination of those words.  There are probably not too many possible combinations.
18  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Cracking bitcoin wallets? on: November 01, 2020, 06:56:41 AM
The short version is:

1. extract "password hash" from wallet.dat using the "Bitcoin2John" script (refer here: https://github.com/openwall/john/blob/bleeding-jumbo/doc/README.bitcoin)
2. run some sort of bruteforce tool to generate passwords and test them against the extracted hash

Most common tools used for Step 2. are:
- Hashcat
- John The Ripper

There is also btcrecover, which will create an extract from the wallet.dat and test passwords against it: https://github.com/gurnec/btcrecover/blob/master/docs/Extract_Scripts.md#usage-for-bitcoin-unlimitedclassicxtcore

Anecdotally, the performance of hashcat seems to be the "best"...


I do not know anything about the password of the wallet itself
This is going to be the largest obstacle... without any sort of knowledge of the number of characters or the types of characters used (lowercase? UPPPERCASE? numb3r5? symbo!s? whole words? etc) then trying to create rules sets to generate passwords to test could be quite difficult... and the possible keyspace is so large, that the whole process will likely be regarded as "impossible".


... and it is in the public domain (still has bitcoin on it),
Not necessarily. While the addresses listed in the wallet might still have BTC assigned to them, it's quite possible the wallet was modified to insert those specific public keys to make it appear that the wallet contains a large amount of BTC, however the encrypted private keys in the wallet do not actually match these addresses. It's impossible to tell until the encryption key is known. Undecided


and I am aware that this isn't easy money, but it is worth a shot.
Honestly, it really isn't... you likely have more chance of winning a lottery than cracking one of these "70,000 BTC" type wallets floating around on the internet Tongue

I have an electrum wallet and cannot remember the password.  I think I know the words i used though so can narrow it down. Could i use any of these things?
19  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Understanding SHA256 (for dummies) on: October 24, 2020, 06:00:40 AM
So, with the SHA256 process (?) we can take any string of words and numbers and *do something* to it and we get a 256 string of ones and zeroes .Small changes to the input give an unrelated new string/key.

This can also be converted to other forms/keys (?) 

Hopefully I got that right.
My questions is....What do we do to the original set of words and numbers?    What is the process?

If t is difficult to explain, then, is there a good analogy or way to explain it?

Thanks
20  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Cost per transaction on Bitcoin? on: October 07, 2020, 06:37:49 AM
So, the absolute, ultimate minimum energy cost for 144 blocks would be 4.25 Million USD. That's ~$30.000/block.
This does not include the fact you'd have to buy 1,25 million ASIC's, and these calculations are for the newest asic on the market, and only paying 4 cents/kwh!!!!
Wow. Thank you so much for taking the time to help me. I appreciate it.
Now i need to find out how many tx can fit in a block. I'm sure that won't be too hard.
Thanks again.
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