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November 12, 2019, 01:46:26 PM *
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1  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Mining (Altcoins) / Re: Trouble finding miner terminal on: November 11, 2019, 04:25:29 PM
Have you tried logging into your router to see what devices are connected?

Maybe the new miner is trying to use the same IP address as one of your other machines or maybe it is in a different subnet.

If it's trying to use the same IP address as one of your other machines you'll probably have to temporarily disconnect your machines one by one to see which IP address is conflicting. Alternatively Connect the troublesome miner on a router of its own and see what IP it requests.

If you find that the miner is in a different subnet (say 192.168.2.xx instead of 192.168.1.xx) you'll need to change the local IP address of your PC to the same subnet as the miner (192.168.2.xx in this case) so as to access the miner and correct its IP address to the correct subnet.
2  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: A pretty straightforward question about newly generated addresses in Armory on: November 10, 2019, 12:52:06 PM
Addresses are derived from a BIG Number, which is randomly generated.
That's not correct because every single addresses reproduced or generated by the wallet come from the master seed key.
I believe the HeRetiK have provide the OP the right answer before.

CounterEntropy is correct as well.

Strictly speaking, the seed is just a big number. So are private keys, public keys, etc... any kind of digital data. Seed phrases are just a way to express those big numbers in a human readable way.

3  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Are all BTC addresses really unique? on: November 08, 2019, 11:20:09 AM
Then you didn't get what I have intended to say, There are 2256 private keys. There are 2160 legacy addresses  calculated from those  keys by applying RIPEMD-160 to SHA-256 hash of those keys. It means at the end we  have collision as only 2160 legacy addresses will correspond to the whole set of  2256 private keys. Roughly each address can be accessible through the set of  296  keys.

Ah... sorry, now I get what you mean. Yes, that sounds about right.


To generate all the possible addresses (assuming you never generated the same address twice), it would require you to continue generating addresses for another:
(1.27 X 1028 seconds to generate ALL addresses) / (4.35 X 1017 seconds in the universe) = 29,195,402,299 entire universes worth of time.

Let's not forget though that assuming Moore's Law applies to this hypothetical technology we'd only have about 70 years until computation time will be reduced to a single universe worth of time.

Just sayin'

(70 years of computation power doubling every two years => 2^35 = 34,359,738,368 times the computation power you started with. Yes I'm aware that technically that's neither what Moore's Law states nor how any of this works.)
4  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Are all BTC addresses really unique? on: November 07, 2019, 08:33:48 PM
That means that each single key may correspond roughly to 2256 / 2160 = 296 addresses, right?

No, it's straight up 2^160 addresses, no need to divide. RIPEMD-160 is used to hash the SHA-256 hash of the corresponding public key [1], reducing the P2PKH address space from a potential 2^256* to 2^160.

*slightly smaller, ECDA's private key space does not cover the full 2^256 [2]


So in fact addresses  are not unique in their nature cuz bunches of them have the same private keys.

There's also P2SH and Bech32 Bitcoin addresses, so any private key corresponds to at least 3 valid Bitcoin addresses.



[1] https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Technical_background_of_version_1_Bitcoin_addresses
[2] https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Private_key

5  Bitcoin / Project Development / Re: The book "Crypto World" The Citadel and the BTC for one million. on: November 05, 2019, 03:46:37 PM
I think you'll want to move this thread to the "Project Development" board:
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?board=12.0

Also don't forget we have Russian boards as well Smiley
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?board=10.0

How far along are you? Good luck with your project!
6  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Discussion / Re: Fun with Bitcoin (Jokes) on: November 05, 2019, 02:35:33 PM
2017 called, they want their crypto jokes back.

...and their bull market.

Sad




How about this one:

- A man enters a bar and attempts to double-spend his bitcoins.
- A man enters a bar and attempts to double-spend his bitcoins.
7  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Are all BTC addresses really unique? on: November 05, 2019, 09:16:51 AM
@DannyHamilton,
Isn't it true that even if we add a passphrase to secure our wallet, it does not add any security locks to the seed and if seed is compromised, the wallet software will not ask for the old passphrase but a new passphrase to the person who hacked it, right?

Depends on the wallet. In some cases the password is used to extend the seed phrase, in some cases it's used to encrypt the wallet file.

e.g. Trezor and Ledger use the password to extend the seed phrase (ie. the private keys are derived from the seed phrase + password), so an adversary can't do anything with the seed phrase alone (except trying to brute-force the accompanying password).


Confirmed? What if they remain unconfirmed during the time the original owner of the wallet sees and catches the fraudulent activity? Are there any chances of reversal?

You can attempt to send a competing transaction spending the same coins with a higher transaction fee, maybe submitting the transaction to an accelerator while you're at it. Unless your adversary has set a really low fee you're unlikely to succeed though.
8  Other / Off-topic / Re: Which categories do you follow most? on: November 04, 2019, 04:56:30 PM
Mostly the technical stuff (Bitcoin Technical Support, Development & Technical Discussion), followed by Meta for news and occasionally dropping by at Beginners & Help.

Recently I've started to keep track of the German local boards again just to see what my local community is up to.
9  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Are all BTC addresses really unique? on: November 04, 2019, 11:56:00 AM
Okay, I get it that chances are nonexistent that it will ever happen to me personally that I will have an address which is the same as another one, but at some point EVER there will be 2 persons with the same BTC address. Whether it is now or in 10 years, it will happen some time.

That's assuming people still exist then Smiley

The question is not "Whether it is now or in 10 years" but more like "Whether it is now or in 10 billion years" (give or take a couple orders of magnitude)

The equation where x = ∞ and y = the number of users creating x amount of addresses will only make it possible for the graph to dissolve this situation into an issue where people may face a 'collision' to each other. But there are chances you may get your seeds or phrases randomly guessed by someone and a person who is intentionally doing it, gets lucky some day.

I mean yeah, there's also a non-zero chance for a bank robber to be able to walk through the wall straight into a bank's vault due to quantum tunneling.

https://physics.stackexchange.com/a/243715

It's just that that chance is very very small. Unlikely-to-occur-before-the-heat-death-of-the-universe small.

Granted the chance of a random private key collision is slightly higher, but still not within a realm that makes sense to consider as a threat model.
10  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: Are all BTC addresses really unique? on: November 04, 2019, 10:31:32 AM
Okay, I get it that chances are nonexistent that it will ever happen to me personally that I will have an address which is the same as another one, but at some point EVER there will be 2 persons with the same BTC address. Whether it is now or in 10 years, it will happen some time.

That's assuming people still exist then Smiley

The question is not "Whether it is now or in 10 years" but more like "Whether it is now or in 10 billion years" (give or take a couple orders of magnitude)
11  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: A pretty straightforward question about newly generated addresses in Armory on: November 04, 2019, 10:23:03 AM
Armory is a HD (hierarchical deterministic) wallet, meaning all its addresses are derived from a seed phrase / master key. This seed phrase is what you write down when making a paper backup of your Armory wallet.

While most modern HD wallets are cross-compatible by following BIP-32 [1], Armory currently uses its own type of HD key derivation. The basic premise is the same though.

[1] https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0032.mediawiki
12  Economy / Securities / Re: SOLD LoyceVs Legendary 10 Month 10 Person 10 Altcoin Investment Roller Coaster#2 on: November 01, 2019, 01:22:35 AM
Oh are we lining up already? Grin

I'm not much of an alt coiner but I do have my doubts that we'll see Bitcoin at 80% market dominance any time soon. Alts are just too tempting a gamble for many people.


Honestly, I don't think the market dominance really makes too much of a difference. I suspect it is more that the market is a bit more mature these days now that the ICO/IEO goldrush is well and truly dead and you're not getting new coins every other day.

I wonder what's going to be the next big thing though. Both the 2013 and 2017 bull markets came with their own flavours of gold rushes (unregulated securities / mining bonds in 2013, ICOs in 2017).
13  Bitcoin / Legal / Re: 150 million taxpayers will have to answer this crypto ques on new IRS Tax Form on: October 31, 2019, 03:28:53 PM
I doubt this will do much for mass adoption but it's definitely yet another example of cryptocurrencies being legitimized. It's quite interesting to see how far we've come, especially since virtual goods having "real world value" has been a hard to grasp concept for most people for the longest time (and it still is for many).

I think it's very difficult to apply tax on crypto, that's why some countries prohibit bitcoin maybe because crypto is an asset to avoid government taxes

Pretty much every country relies to some extend on people self-reporting their income. People avoiding taxes by earning off-the-book income has been a thing since... well, since people have taxes. Crypto has nothing to do with it.
14  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Sender recall on: October 31, 2019, 11:10:25 AM
My thinking is something like this:
After a given time (years) it could be a good option for the sender to be able call back/invalidate a still unspent transaction.

I believe this could help a lot of people to reclaim lost funds. I know this is a big one (maybe a silly too) one and won't be fast if ever happens. Goes a against the basics too, but not so much I believe as if someone want's to avoid this possibility he/she would only need to move the funds and that would make this "re-call" impossible.

Thing is, that would open a whole different can of worms. Now you get people wondering why the coins they bought a couple years back have suddenly vanished (ie. stolen back by prior owners). Now instead of "You should have kept a backup" it's "You should have moved your coins after receiving them". Makes matters kinda worse, don't you think?

Even worse still, that would pretty much break cold storage. The coins you sent to cold storage to hold unto for the next couple of years? Anyone getting access to the hot wallet you used to sent the coins to cold storage is now able to clean out your stash some time further down the road, even if the hot wallet is empty by now.
15  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Segmentation? on: October 31, 2019, 10:18:39 AM
Any node that only recently connected and isn't synced can rely
on the PoW consensus mechanism to help distinguish genuine
genesis blocks from fakes, just as we do now with regular blocks.
That means trusting the longest chain representing the greatest
amount of work.

That's the thing though, a node won't know what the longest chain following a checkpoint-genesis-block is until they have downloaded and validated all subsequent blocks.

Worse still, they have to do this check for each checkpoint-genesis-block they receive, every time. Even without someone actively trying to attack the network this would put you in a situation where each checkpoint-genesis-block would be followed by an increased orphan rate, making it a very risky and unreliable time frame to accept payments.
16  Bitcoin / Bitcoin Technical Support / Re: R S Z on: October 30, 2019, 06:19:14 PM
I haven't tested it, but here's a short Python snipped I found that extracts R and S from a transaction's ScriptSig

Code:
from pyasn1.codec.der import decoder as asn1der
int_value = asn1der.decode(asn_sig.decode('hex')[1:]) #asn_sig is the scriptsig hex
long(int_value[0][0]) #R Value in int form
long(int_value[0][1]) #S Value in int form

Calculating the Z value is a bit more complicated but this thread (and its stackexchange link) should point you in the right direction:
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1796142.0
https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/32628/redeeming-a-raw-transaction-step-by-step-example-required/32695#32695
17  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Segmentation? on: October 30, 2019, 05:34:17 PM
I might be wrong but that sounds like you'd get a really huge checkpoint block every N blocks which would make an especially critical block especially likely to be orphaned.

Have you looked into MimbleWimble? It's cut-through approach for getting rid of blockchain bloat may be of interest to you:
https://github.com/mimblewimble/grin/blob/master/doc/intro.md


Ahhh are you yet to find the prune option which means you only have to store a small amount of the chain (I think it's 4gb min or it used to be). This means you can sync transactions and keep the mempool avaliable but also allow for lara data you don't need to be deleted.

The smallest recommended prune setting is 550, ie. 550 blocks. So that's worst case maybe 2gb, assuming blocks full of the most bloated possible SegWit transactions. In practice that's currently probably closer to 0.4 - 0.7 gigs.
18  Bitcoin / Development & Technical Discussion / Re: Download and Upload big file to blockchain program on: October 28, 2019, 12:11:05 PM
Blockchain is not suitable to store a huge file. The cost outweighs the benefit.

Yes, it true if we took about bitcoin... but if using existing coin with low fee, like dogecoin cost can be low..
it is more environmentally friendly because miner need buy ssd instead ASIC and it spends less electricity.

Be aware that the moment you start storing huge files on low-fee cryptocurrencies you'll see either (a) the fee increasing significantly, due to lack of available block-space or (b) the blockchain facing serious scalability issues due to each node having to validate and propagate huge amounts of data. It sounds like a fun project nonetheless though.



now i create my own cryptocurrency(file hosting) and i need disable or reset too-long-mempool-chain protection in source and make it more faster... where i can find this parameters? and why this parameter set in bitcoin?

I think this thread should answer you which settings to add to the config file:
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=3791899.0

Apart from that you should be able to find the default constants being set here (starting at line 54):
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/b688b859dbb2b5af2e9d19cae9dce3e3e14bd2c1/src/validation.h

19  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Speculation (Altcoins) / Re: Has alt season started? on: October 25, 2019, 01:33:48 PM
The idea is that you will be able to buy Libra only with Bitcoin right?

What makes you think Libra will only be purchasable using Bitcoin? Honestly I wouldn't be surprised if Facebook would sell Libra for anything but Bitcoin.

20  Alternate cryptocurrencies / Speculation (Altcoins) / Re: Has alt season started? on: October 25, 2019, 01:14:34 PM
Don't people have any patience anymore? It's not even Bitcoin season yet Smiley

I wouldn't expect alts to show major action before Bitcoin has confirmed the end of the bear market. Of course at this point alts won't be at their cheapest anymore, but I wouldn't bet on alts having reached their bottom before Bitcoin has stabilized.
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