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Author Topic: Calculating heat generated.  (Read 3204 times)
allinvain
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May 29, 2011, 07:54:21 AM
 #21

In most places I know of electricity is cheaper than natural gas/heating oil so yeah I guess you would be saving $ on heating costs.

Where in the world are you?

There is absolutely no comparison between gas and electric heat where I am. I paid about $60 a month to keep a 4000 sq. ft house toasty warm with gas last winter.

I'd be better off burning dollar bills to keep warm than paying for electric heat.

I'm in Canada. You know what let me check my gas bill cause I may have spoken with my ass lol :p..one moment plz..nope I was correct..I pay $0.14 per cubic meter of gas, but pay only $0.06 in the winter for electricity.



You need to check your units.  a cubic metre of gas is a lot more energy than a kilowatt-hour of electricity.

On equal units:

a gigajoule of natural gas (26.3 cubic metres) costs me $4.55 ($0.1725/cubic metre)

a gigajoule of electricity (278 kilowatt-hours) costs me $24.93 ($0.09/kilowatt-hour)

Even using your prices, natural gas is still way cheaper ($16.68 vs. $3.68).

Oooops Tongue I guess I totally forgot about the total energy content of both sources of energy. So yeah in the end when you take in the total amount of energy required to heat a house with electricity alone natural gas would be cheaper even though on a per minimum unit of consumption basis electricity is cheaper. One can easily get fooled if you don't take the energy content into consideration.

I don't think anyone will realistically use miner heat to warm up the house. I think a smarter solution would be to move mining equipment into a room or area where you can shut off the furnace vents or maybe even open up the windows and let in the cold winter air.

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mathx
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May 29, 2011, 10:23:15 AM
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I don't think anyone will realistically use miner heat to warm up the house. I think a smarter solution would be to move mining equipment into a room or area where you can shut off the furnace vents or maybe even open up the windows and let in the cold winter air.

haha, you're missing the point! any money saved by heating your house with your rigs is now LOST to the outside! why not just... HEAT YOUR HOUSE with your rigs?

If the rigs are putting out too much heat however, you could have a distribution issue, and need fans (which cost power too). Better to spread the rigs around the house,
in drafty areas, say under windows Wink

Still you are saving the cost of gas on that electricity only, still going to be 7-10c/kWh in most of the cheaper markets for heating by electricity, and still much more (tho in such markets,
gas tends to be more $ too - there's some friction between gas and electricity prices in each market).
allinvain
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May 29, 2011, 01:46:01 PM
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Hmm I guess, but isn't it going to take a LOT of heat from the miners to reasonably warm up the house. I guess if you can tolerate colder than what you're used to temps during the winter then it's ok.

I think to reasonably heat up a modestly sized house you're going to need to output multiple kilowatts/h of heat. But if you have good insulation you can maybe slowly warm up the house and it will retain the heat for a while.


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June 04, 2011, 04:31:51 AM
 #24

Hmm I guess, but isn't it going to take a LOT of heat from the miners to reasonably warm up the house. I guess if you can tolerate colder than what you're used to temps during the winter then it's ok.

I think to reasonably heat up a modestly sized house you're going to need to output multiple kilowatts/h of heat. But if you have good insulation you can maybe slowly warm up the house and it will retain the heat for a while.

Super efficient houses use a 1000W heater at intervals for the whole house. Most space heaters are 1200+W and you'd need 5-10 of them for a regular house (1500-2000 sq ft), more for bigger houses, if they're poorly insulated.

Depends on how many rigs yer running.
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June 04, 2011, 04:59:06 AM
 #25

Thanks, that's what I'm looking for when using an A/C rated in BTUs.

I imagine in cold climates that the electric used for the system converted to heat would equate to home heat savings.

Umm yes and no. What you're doing is using electricity to heat your home instead of natural gas. In most places I know of electricity is cheaper than natural gas/heating oil so yeah I guess you would be saving $ on heating costs. The thing is that you'd have to figure out some way to push all that heat from the miners and circulate it around the house. I wonder if anyone has setup a ghetto rig to push the heat into a furnace's ducts.

I have a fireplace with a heatilator (sp?) circulating system. I suppose I could place the mining rig there and use a video monitor to display a GPU generated fireplace display.  Cheesy


I got my two rigs in the fireplace, dumping the heat out the chimney Lips sealed

gigabytecoin
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June 04, 2011, 06:57:21 AM
 #26

I have a feeling that a $200 12k BTU AC is much crappier/warmer than a $400 12k BTU AC... so be careful! I have looked into portable ACs as well and it seems that the less you pay.. the worse quality you receive. As in it's not actually 12k BTUs worth of cold for example.
allinvain
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June 04, 2011, 07:34:28 AM
 #27

Thanks, that's what I'm looking for when using an A/C rated in BTUs.

I imagine in cold climates that the electric used for the system converted to heat would equate to home heat savings.

Umm yes and no. What you're doing is using electricity to heat your home instead of natural gas. In most places I know of electricity is cheaper than natural gas/heating oil so yeah I guess you would be saving $ on heating costs. The thing is that you'd have to figure out some way to push all that heat from the miners and circulate it around the house. I wonder if anyone has setup a ghetto rig to push the heat into a furnace's ducts.

I have a fireplace with a heatilator (sp?) circulating system. I suppose I could place the mining rig there and use a video monitor to display a GPU generated fireplace display.  Cheesy


I got my two rigs in the fireplace, dumping the heat out the chimney Lips sealed

 Cheesy kick ass...that's one smart use of the fireplace..



allinvain
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June 04, 2011, 07:57:17 AM
 #28

I have a feeling that a $200 12k BTU AC is much crappier/warmer than a $400 12k BTU AC... so be careful! I have looked into portable ACs as well and it seems that the less you pay.. the worse quality you receive. As in it's not actually 12k BTUs worth of cold for example.

Well, remember the old adage: "you get what you pay for"

Some of those portable ACs are most likely not as efficient as regular in window or central air style ACs. Quote from the consumer reports website

"Dual-hose portables—which have two hoses that vent through a window; one brings air in from the outside to cool the condenser coils, and the other exhausts the hoy, humid room air back to the outside—did a slightly better cooling job than the single-hose models we've previously tested, But their ability to cool fell short of similar-size window units, and they couldn't cool the testing chamber to the desired temperature."



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