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Author Topic: Golang Mnemonic Passwords  (Read 718 times)
Taek
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July 25, 2015, 03:26:28 PM
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I created a library in golang that will take random collections of bytes and turn them into mnemonic passwords. You can read more about it and view the code here:

https://github.com/NebulousLabs/entropy-mnemonics
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melisande
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July 25, 2015, 08:02:16 PM
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I created a library in golang that will take random collections of bytes and turn them into mnemonic passwords. You can read more about it and view the code here:

https://github.com/NebulousLabs/entropy-mnemonics
Hello david vorick, your project might be very interesting but only few people here understood what you mean by NebulousLabs/entropy-mnemonics.
What is it been used for? and some other questions is waiting for your answers.
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July 26, 2015, 04:16:19 AM
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OP please what is Golang Mnemonic Passwords?

Taek
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July 30, 2015, 04:16:59 PM
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Sorry for the delay on my response.

The readme covers most of the information. For those unaware, golang is a programming language developed by Robert Griesemer, Rob Pike, and Ken Thompson. This is a mnemonic password library for golang.

The general gist is that it helps you create safer and easier to remember brainwallet passwords. (Or, because memorization is not always recommended, makes passwords that are easier to write down on paper without making mistakes).

A 128-bit password in base 64 looks like this:

ompIIeNsf33MqlSEwIDO+g==

But when those bytes are converted to a mnemonic phrase, it looks like this:

austere sniff aching hiding pact damp focus tacit timber pram left wonders

---

The library I wrote will convert arbitrary data into mnemonic data and back. For example, when randomly generating a password, you would generate 16 random bytes, convert them to a mnemonic string like the one above, and then the mnemonic string is what you present to the user. When the user needs to put in their password again, they give you the mnemonic password and you convert it back into the original 16 random bytes using the library.

Another way to look at this library is 'human friendly entropy'
melisande
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July 30, 2015, 04:53:58 PM
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OK, this actually enhance password security by encoding it with different alphabets and words.
If so it is really good for securing many thing online.
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July 30, 2015, 05:37:45 PM
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OK, this actually enhance password security by encoding it with different alphabets and words.
If so it is really good for securing many thing online.

I don't think you're understanding the point of this. It's a convenience ENCODING, not an encryption algorithm. It's designed to commit a bitstring to memory in a human-friendly way.

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July 30, 2015, 05:54:46 PM
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OK, this actually enhance password security by encoding it with different alphabets and words.
If so it is really good for securing many thing online.

I don't think you're understanding the point of this. It's a convenience ENCODING, not an encryption algorithm. It's designed to commit a bitstring to memory in a human-friendly way.
I am just a normal bitcoin user that lack most of the technicality and the more someone explains this the more I get confused.
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