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Author Topic: China's Rights Lawyers Say Judicial White Paper 'Full of Lies'  (Read 560 times)
liyueyue8964
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September 18, 2016, 09:21:40 AM
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China's Rights Lawyers Say Judicial White Paper 'Full of Lies'

2016-09-13


http://www.rfa.org/english/news/china/china-judicial-09132016135020.html

Wives of Chinese human rights lawyers detained in a 2015 crackdown wearing the names of their husbands after filing complaints at the Supreme People’s Procuratorate in Beijing, July 4, 2016.
 AFP
Rights lawyers have dismissed recent claims by the ruling Chinese Communist Party that it has improved treatment of prisoners and detainees in its judicial system, saying the country's human rights situation continues to worsen.

Judicial authorities have "put in place a system to exclude unlawful evidence and protect the legitimate rights and interests of criminal suspects," according to a white paper issued on Monday by China's cabinet, the State Council.

It said the police are now operating under new rules governing interrogations, in a bid to safeguard detainees.

"The interrogation rooms of public security organs and detention houses are all equipped with audio and video recording facilities to prevent misconduct in law enforcement such as extorting confessions by torture and obtaining evidence through illegal means," the official Xinhua news agency cited the paper as saying.

The paper comes amid growing concerns for the safety of dozens of human rights lawyers and associates locked up in an unknown location by the Chinese authorities in a crackdown that started in July 2015, without access to their lawyers.

Rights groups say enforced disappearances put suspects at greater risk of torture and other mistreatment, while threats against family members may be used to elicit videotaped "confessions," as in the case of veteran political journalist Gao Yu.

Chinese rights lawyers told RFA that the white paper takes no account of the realities of the country's law enforcement practices.

"Everything in this document is fake," Beijing-based rights lawyer Chen Jiangang said in an interview after the white paper was published. "The [detention of rights lawyers] since July 9, 2015 has been huge and widespread, and has involved their partners and children in a human rights tragedy."

"That took place in China, and everything in this paper is a lie."

Simply follow the constitution

Chen said all the authorities need to do to protect human rights in the judicial system is to implement the country's constitutional protections fully.

"The Criminal Procedure Law allows for the right to see a lawyer ... and the right to exchange letters with family members, but not one of the people detained in the July 9, 2015 crackdown has had their rights protected in this way," he said.

Fellow Beijing rights lawyer Liang Xiaojun said the white paper is likely aimed at soothing growing public concern over the violation of the rights of individuals by law enforcement agencies.

"I think this is targeted at a number of academics, lawyers and journalists who have begun to gradually realize in recent years that the human rights situation is continuing to worsen," Liang said.

"They are probably trying to refute this view by issuing a white paper saying that human rights protection is doing well [in China]," he said.

The white paper also claimed that China only employs the death penalty under "very strict" circumstances, Xinhua said.

"China's attitude toward the death penalty is to ensure that it applies only to a very small number of extremely serious criminal offenders," it said.

Closely guarded secret

According to London-based rights group Amnesty International, China likely executes thousands of people annually, more than the rest of the world put together, although the number of recent executions have remained a closely guarded secret.

"In death penalty cases, the defendant's right to defense and other legitimate rights and interests are fully protected, as hearings are held for all death penalty cases of second instance," the white paper said.

Rights lawyer Li Guisheng said there is still widespread public support for the death penalty in China, however.

"There aren't very many people who support it in the cities, but in the countryside a lot of people see it as a form of reparation, a life for a life," Li said.

He said suspended death sentences and life sentences still aren't seen as enough to fulfill this principle.

"In the case of a suspended death sentence, most people don't end up getting executed during the two-year suspension period," Li said.

"Instead, it's commuted to life imprisonment, which in turn later gets commuted to a shorter jail term after some time has been served."

Rights lawyer Sui Muqing said the lack of judicial independence lies at the heart of many rights abuses in China.

"First and foremost, the judiciary must operate independently," Sui said. "China has never managed to make that happen."

"And that means that the executive is always above the law."

Reported by Yang Fan for RFA's Mandarin Service, and by Goh Fung for the Cantonese Service. Translated and written in English by Luisetta Mudie.




Wives of Chinese human rights lawyers detained in a 2015 crackdown wearing the names of their husbands after filing complaints at the Supreme People’s Procuratorate in Beijing, July 4, 2016. (AFP)
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liyueyue8964
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September 18, 2016, 04:09:49 PM
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china government big bullshit !!!!!!
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September 19, 2016, 11:02:40 PM
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China's Rights Lawyers Say Judicial White Paper 'Full of Lies'
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September 20, 2016, 01:14:30 AM
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Being a human rights lawyer in China is a very dangerous job. Sad
Many are put in prisons, beaten and tortured for months at a time.
Others simply disappear, never to be heard from again.
The government does not like people speaking out against them, and since these lawyers are well-educated, and have decent jobs, the government views them as a big threat.
Much respect to them and please god protect them.

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September 20, 2016, 09:41:51 PM
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revolution!!! Angry Angry Angry Angry Angry Angry
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September 21, 2016, 05:02:12 PM
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SBCHINA
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September 26, 2016, 02:23:26 PM
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http://www.rfa.org/english/news/china/germany-dissidents-09232016153752.html


China Rights Defenders, Dissidents Invited to German Embassy Party
2016-09-23

Several Chinese dissidents were invited to Germany's Embassy in Beijing on Friday for festivities marking the Oct. 3 Day of German Unity, a move one poet praised as a rare show of support amid an intensifying crackdown on lawyers, activists and bloggers.

Among the guests were activist Hu Jia, the wife of one of the lawyers who disappeared in the July 2015 round-up of hundreds of rights defenders, and  journalist  Gao Yu, who is on medical parole from a five-year jail term. Gao, 71 or 72, was sentenced to a seven-year jail term in 2015 for "leaking state secrets overseas,”but the sentence was cut on appeal to five years by the Beijing High People's Court last November.

Beijing human rights activist Hu Jia told RFA's Cantonese Service he had talked to European diplomats at the party about the situation of jailed Uyghur scholar IIham Tohti as well as the fate of  Xia Lin and other lawyers caught in the crackdown.

Tohti, named last week as a finalist for the European Parliament's 2016 Sakharov Prize, was sentenced to life in prison following his conviction for  "separatism"  on Sept. 23, 2014.

Xia Lin, a lawyer  whose clients have included dissident artist Ai Weiwei, was sentenced to 12 years' imprisonment for "fraud" by a Beijing court on Thursday, in a decision rights groups said was political persecution for handling sensitive cases.

"The diplomats are very concerned about the situation of Tohti in prison and also his family as well. They are mainly concerned about his wife and two young children in Beijing," Hu told RFA.

"I could only say that his health was still good, that he had recovered after his trial. He might have intentionally shown that he was well, so the family would not be worrie...nobody knows," Hu added.

Hu said his ability to update the diplomats on Tohti was limited "because there are strict visitation restrictions imposed."

"His family is not allowed to mention any matters, including to friends. They can't tell him anything about outside the world.  What he thinks or his thoughts are not able to be relayed as well," added Hu.

Outspoken poet Wang Zang likened China's repression and censorship to the Berlin Wall.

"There are so many Chinese invited to the Germany embassy, it's quite encouraging. I appreciate that Germany continues to raise concerns the human rights with China, not like other countries," Wang told RFA. 

"Taking down the 'Berlin Wall' in China requires the efforts of all," he said.

Reported by Su Yitong and Pan Jiaqing for RFA's Cantonese Service. Translated by Vivian Kwan. Written in English by Paul Eckert.
liyueyue8964
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September 27, 2016, 07:43:01 PM
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again up
Vika NSFW
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September 27, 2016, 08:29:34 PM
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FACTS.ORG.CN

The climate change provide some new Internet activity, right?

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September 28, 2016, 01:23:34 AM
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3-D printers for the Chinese people.    Cool
eduaro66
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September 28, 2016, 08:57:17 AM
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It ruled the Communist Party human rights will be infringed. So it was in the USSR. The communist regime in itself contrary to the human nature.
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