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Author Topic: Question about electrical installation for home mining  (Read 672 times)
GMPoison
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February 22, 2017, 09:26:14 PM
 #1

I'm sure it's been posted here many times before, but since I'm still in the planning stages and haven't gotten any estimates from any electricians, does anyone have a clue about what it would cost to have a small 8 slot subpanel with a 220v/30a circuit installed for powering up a couple S9's (to start)? The main panel doesn't have any room so a subpanel is the only way to go.

I've read from various forums it should cost anywhere around $500-$1000, does that sound about right? It will be installed in a garage so it won't require making any long runs through ceilings or anything like that. I'm also thinking rather than buying an expensive 220v pdu for each set of four miners (one pdu per circuit) to power them, installing a row of four outlets next to the subpanel on a piece of plywood or something would be cheaper and easier. Thoughts?
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February 22, 2017, 09:30:35 PM
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Sounds about right, but electrician can give you better estimate when he sees your location and then knows stuff&work needed for the installations.

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February 22, 2017, 09:34:57 PM
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Sounds about right, but electrician can give you better estimate when he sees your location and then knows stuff&work needed for the installations.

Thanks, and what would you say about the 'no pdu' idea? I see you're a home miner yourself. If you could install a subpanel in your garage next to your miners, would you opt for an expensive pdu per circuit (4 miners) or just install four outlets to draw power directly from the miners? Which "should" be cheaper/more practical? Even though you don't know my situation, if you're an electrician could you estimate?
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February 22, 2017, 09:37:50 PM
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I would install a small subpanel and have X amount of outlets feeded from X amount of circuits installed. (depends on your needs)

I don't know the ANSI standard world (USA), so I can't estimate a cost, sorry.

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February 23, 2017, 01:25:51 AM
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In the US actually it is UL/CSA (Canada) and NFPA code that must be followed.
Anywho, one question that comes to mind is this: If your current panel has no more room, will it also have to be upgraded  to one with bigger main breaker & bus bars to feed the sub panel? How about the utility line feeding the house? If the main needs to be upgraded for higher current service then the 2nd panel probably becomes moot because a new panel will have more slots for circuits...

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February 23, 2017, 01:36:57 AM
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In the US actually it is UL/CSA (Canada) and NFPA code that must be followed.
Anywho, one question that comes to mind is this: If your current panel has no more room, will it also have to be upgraded  to one with bigger main breaker & bus bars to feed the sub panel? How about the utility line feeding the house? If the main needs to be upgraded for higher current service then the 2nd panel probably becomes moot because a new panel will have more slots for circuits...

This and to follow up.

is your main panel  200 amps with 40 circuits
or 150 amp with 32 circuits

or 100 amp with 24 circuits

as for  no pdu  let me link to you what works



should do 2-3 s-9's
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-PDU-APC-AP6015-Power-Distribution-Unit-0T834-with-Cord-Tested-Good-/232099723175?

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GMPoison
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February 23, 2017, 02:20:22 AM
 #7

In the US actually it is UL/CSA (Canada) and NFPA code that must be followed.
Anywho, one question that comes to mind is this: If your current panel has no more room, will it also have to be upgraded  to one with bigger main breaker & bus bars to feed the sub panel? How about the utility line feeding the house? If the main needs to be upgraded for higher current service then the 2nd panel probably becomes moot because a new panel will have more slots for circuits...

I should have clarified, the panel isn't completely full, there are are two single slots available. However, if the main breaker needed to be upgraded, why would I install a sub panel? Also, I'm no electrician, but I'm fairly sure the utility line feeding the house isn't saturated either lol, that seems like a bit much. I'll have to get an electrician out to assess my situation though.
GMPoison
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February 23, 2017, 02:22:05 AM
 #8

In the US actually it is UL/CSA (Canada) and NFPA code that must be followed.
Anywho, one question that comes to mind is this: If your current panel has no more room, will it also have to be upgraded  to one with bigger main breaker & bus bars to feed the sub panel? How about the utility line feeding the house? If the main needs to be upgraded for higher current service then the 2nd panel probably becomes moot because a new panel will have more slots for circuits...

This and to follow up.

is your main panel  200 amps with 40 circuits
or 150 amp with 32 circuits

or 100 amp with 24 circuits

as for  no pdu  let me link to you what works



should do 2-3 s-9's
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-PDU-APC-AP6015-Power-Distribution-Unit-0T834-with-Cord-Tested-Good-/232099723175?

I'd have to check as far as the main breaker goes, but I ran the numbers and you can run four S9's on a 220v 30a circuit following the 80/20 power rule. I'm also not too concerned with a pdu as it should cost around the same to simply install four outlets rather than just one and having to buy a pdu since the electrician will be here anyway.
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