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Author Topic: Primary and secondary education  (Read 1474 times)
Rassah
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May 13, 2013, 08:27:47 PM
 #21

For instance: The skills you use in insurance actuary are the same skills you use in determining the odds in a game of chance, such as D&D.

This just tells me you don't know much about insurance  Undecided I wish it was the same.

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May 13, 2013, 08:36:46 PM
 #22

For instance: The skills you use in insurance actuary are the same skills you use in determining the odds in a game of chance, such as D&D.

This just tells me you don't know much about insurance  Undecided I wish it was the same.
They're both figuring odds. Yes, insurance actuary is (much) more complex, but it's the same basic principle.

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May 13, 2013, 10:50:32 PM
 #23

I approve of this. We should teach kids how to learn, and then let them learn.

I think we should force them to learn how to learn, and then provide them with materials and sources to learn from. I think kids are lazy. I also think "letting them learn" shirts parenting and educator responsibility by suggesting that as long as they know how to learn, they're on their own, instead of providing them with tools. My bias comes from me growing up and being surrounded by lazy American kids, and watching them be completely wiped out in education and skills by Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and Russian/Ukrainian kids.

Then again, I guess as long as America can sustain being lazy, and competing in the world by continuing to import immigrant labor (I don't mean for farming, I mean for all the top management and research positions in top businesses), then it'll be ok. But my fear is that fewer and fewer educated immigrants are choosing to come to America.
I seriously don't understand this logic. Kids are people too. After primary/secondary school, we are the same person we were when we were in school.  People aren't forced to learn but they still decide to do it because it benefits themselves. It's not like "fuck yes! I'm out of school! I don't have to learn anything ever again!" No.

I'm gonna say it again. Kids are people too. If we gave them a reason to learn, then they would learn. They aren't some second-class mentally retarded subspecies that need to be forced to do things they don't want to do. If we treated children like people and not children, then they'd behave like people.

Using coercion to educate people is not and has never been the solution, no matter how young the people in question are.
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May 13, 2013, 11:15:26 PM
 #24

I seriously don't understand this logic. Kids are people too. After primary/secondary school, we are the same person we were when we were in school.  People aren't forced to learn but they still decide to do it because it benefits themselves. It's not like "fuck yes! I'm out of school! I don't have to learn anything ever again!" No.

I'm gonna say it again. Kids are people too. If we gave them a reason to learn, then they would learn. They aren't some second-class mentally retarded subspecies that need to be forced to do things they don't want to do. If we treated children like people and not children, then they'd behave like people.

Using coercion to educate people is not and has never been the solution, no matter how young the people in question are.

This this this this and some more of this.  Kids don't become people when they turn 18; kids aren't property until they turn 18; kids aren't yours or ours and theirs or his, they're people, they were always people, and they should be treated as they are, people, or else they'll grow up thinking they're dogs.  Treat someone like an animal, they'll assume the role of an animal.  There's a disturbing connection between people even in their 40's and above and the way they act like children facing their parents when it comes to the relationship between the citizen and the state.  You break a kid in early, and tell them to listen to you or you'll beat them, like they're not human, like they're a dog needing discipline, and yeah, they'll be obedient lap dogs, and they'll keep that behavior up until the day they die, or until they break out of it of their own accord, as is the case with many of us who were hit when we were younger.  Force teaches people that they're not people, that they're subjugate to a higher power, whether it's the parent, the state, or God itself; that they're second to something else, that there's some real or abstract entity that is above them in every sense of the word.  The worst part is, we don't need to teach someone how to be a person; they're like that already.  We suffocate the logic that a kid is human by telling him he has to do this or that or he'll be punished; you basically turn that human being off, and introduce coercion, as in, "Do this behavior and you'll be punished, but do this other behavior and you'll be rewarded."  This is dog logic.  People logic works as follows: "Do this behavior and you'll be hurting people, but do this behavior and people will be glad you did it."  As all of these conversations boil down to, it's the difference between force and voluntarism.  It's behavior directed by one's own empathy, not behavior directed by another's hand.  It's the difference between freedom and slavery, and it all starts with a freshly created human being.

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