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Author Topic: Home Mining with ASIC - Before I call an electrician  (Read 241 times)
Machair
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December 05, 2017, 03:35:29 PM
 #1

I'm looking at picking up one or two S9's for starters but I want to get my electrical all figured out first. I'm not sure the ideal setup and what I should be asking an electrician to do exactly.

I've read a 220v/30 amp breaker can handle two S9's + ASW3 PSU's
or running one each on a 15 amp breaker.

One thought I had was repurposing the breaker marked Heat on the top right, it's a 30 and isn't used, or if there's space just adding in some breakers.

If I don't have space in the panel and can't reuse the breaker, I've read running a sub-panel would work.
My Concern is I'm in the US and believe at that point the bill would more than double and easily be $2000-$4000 and require a permit.

What options do I have with my panel currently?
What should I be asking the electrician for?

Any Advice is much appreciated


https://imgur.com/a/vYs7N
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cableiso
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December 05, 2017, 04:12:01 PM
 #2

Your electrician can repurpose the unused breaker if you are sure it is not tied to your current heater or thermostat, etc.

You are right that you want a 220/240v, 30a breaker.  I would suggest buying a cheap PDU (glorified power strip) from eBay, then have your electrician install one or two L6-30 outlets, that's what the pdu will plug in to.

To connect from the pdu to the power supply you will need a cable called c13 to c14, they're about $2 or so.

I am suggesting the pdu route because it uses the same setup as data centers, meaning that none of the cords are special and the cost is as low as you can get.  That's my suggestion, when I researched it the fancy dryer adapter cords cost more than $100 and I got a PDU for about $35.
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December 06, 2017, 03:18:39 AM
 #3

I'm looking at picking up one or two S9's for starters but I want to get my electrical all figured out first. I'm not sure the ideal setup and what I should be asking an electrician to do exactly.

I've read a 220v/30 amp breaker can handle two S9's + ASW3 PSU's
or running one each on a 15 amp breaker.

One thought I had was repurposing the breaker marked Heat on the top right, it's a 30 and isn't used, or if there's space just adding in some breakers.

If I don't have space in the panel and can't reuse the breaker, I've read running a sub-panel would work.
My Concern is I'm in the US and believe at that point the bill would more than double and easily be $2000-$4000 and require a permit.

What options do I have with my panel currently?
What should I be asking the electrician for?

Any Advice is much appreciated


https://imgur.com/a/vYs7N

Absolutely have an electrician check the breaker to make sure it is in fact unused as last poster suggested. Have him install the L6-30 outlet. A PDU is your best option then, you can run 3 S9's off of a 30amp PDU.

If you decide to increase your mining operation, adding a sub panel is the best idea. I can't see it costing more than a few hundred bucks. Then run new 10/2 wiring from it to your mining location with the same setup as above, as many times as you see fit.
Machair
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December 06, 2017, 02:42:23 PM
 #4

Your electrician can repurpose the unused breaker if you are sure it is not tied to your current heater or thermostat, etc.

You are right that you want a 220/240v, 30a breaker.  I would suggest buying a cheap PDU (glorified power strip) from eBay, then have your electrician install one or two L6-30 outlets, that's what the pdu will plug in to.

To connect from the pdu to the power supply you will need a cable called c13 to c14, they're about $2 or so.

I am suggesting the pdu route because it uses the same setup as data centers, meaning that none of the cords are special and the cost is as low as you can get.  That's my suggestion, when I researched it the fancy dryer adapter cords cost more than $100 and I got a PDU for about $35.

After I took the pictures I went ahead and turned the breaker off, and before anything's done it'll be checked. For adding more breakers does it look like there's room?

I spent some time searching for 30a 208v+ PDU's and mostly found ones with 16-20 outlets. I'm assuming ideally I could find a 2-4 outlet PDU, and that more outlets would be pointless because I wouldn't be able to plug in more than 2-3 S9's?

I did find an L6-30P to C13 Power cord for ~$30 on Amazon. Would two of these plugged into two outlets from the one breaker work for two S9's?






Absolutely have an electrician check the breaker to make sure it is in fact unused as last poster suggested. Have him install the L6-30 outlet. A PDU is your best option then, you can run 3 S9's off of a 30amp PDU.

If you decide to increase your mining operation, adding a sub panel is the best idea. I can't see it costing more than a few hundred bucks. Then run new 10/2 wiring from it to your mining location with the same setup as above, as many times as you see fit.

I'll definitely inquire about the sub panel, and hopefully, it won't be nearly as much as I'm expecting.

I'm still trying to figure out just what all my options with are with my current panel in term's of future expansion without having to add a sub panel yet.


I really appreciate your time and responses,
Thanks



CrypotoCreanis
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December 06, 2017, 02:52:13 PM
 #5

Your electrician can repurpose the unused breaker if you are sure it is not tied to your current heater or thermostat, etc.

You are right that you want a 220/240v, 30a breaker.  I would suggest buying a cheap PDU (glorified power strip) from eBay, then have your electrician install one or two L6-30 outlets, that's what the pdu will plug in to.

To connect from the pdu to the power supply you will need a cable called c13 to c14, they're about $2 or so.

I am suggesting the pdu route because it uses the same setup as data centers, meaning that none of the cords are special and the cost is as low as you can get.  That's my suggestion, when I researched it the fancy dryer adapter cords cost more than $100 and I got a PDU for about $35.

After I took the pictures I went ahead and turned the breaker off, and before anything's done it'll be checked. For adding more breakers does it look like there's room?

Yes looks like you can 1 more double pole breaker, bottom right.

I spent some time searching for 30a 208v+ PDU's and mostly found ones with 16-20 outlets. I'm assuming ideally I could find a 2-4 outlet PDU, and that more outlets would be pointless because I wouldn't be able to plug in more than 2-3 S9's?

Yes they would be pointless. I found a 30a one with 4 outlets on them

I did find an L6-30P to C13 Power cord for ~$30 on Amazon. Would two of these plugged into two outlets from the one breaker work for two S9's?

You need 1 cord from the outlet to the PDU, then a cord for each power supply also to the pdu







Gpx
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December 06, 2017, 04:01:07 PM
 #6

Just to add a few points ...

S9's need a 240v supply, so you won't run them on 120v 15 amp circuits.

A 240v 30 amp line should support 3 S9's, but here's what you want to keep in mind going forward

1. Each S9 draws about 5.8 amps (based on published wattage figures). The PDUs should only add a little (you'll have to check the specs).  Most of what goes in one end comes out the other. The only addition is a fan and the loss from efficiency, so i think we can estimate about 6 amps per PDU+S9 pair. That makes 18 amps for 3 miners.

2. You cannot run continuously at the max load of a Panel, breaker, or branch circuit (line + outlet). When planning for continuous draw you need to increase the maximum load capacity. There is an exact formula for code, but an easy rule of thumb is if your system capacity is twice your continuous draw, you'll be fine.  So your 30 amp line can power your 18amp miner draw - but you need to check your overall continuous draw on the panel itself. Most household loads are not continuous , but A/C can be, so add your miner power draw to your A/C draw (for your house) to get an idea of you total continuous draw.

Don't forget to factor in A/C for your miners. You'll need to cool them in summer months and they will run continuously .

You can repurpose the 30 amp heater sockets (if you don't need them) but i would at least get new breakers. Old breakers can get wonky especially if you start putting a lot of extra load on them. They don't cost much.

Can I add additional breakers?
 .... sometimes. You should ask some one with more knowledge how much is ok for your situation.

A sub panel: No harm in doing that, but if you are only going to run a single 30 amp line to it there is no need for it.  Before you go this route figure out if you have enough power available from your existing main panel to run multiple 240 branch circuits off a sub panel.   

Upgrading you panel:
This can be more expensive than you might think. Many houses have a 200 amp panel. Replacing with another 200 amp panel is fairly straight forward and the panels on cost about $80, but if you upgrade to a higher capacity you could see a lot of additional charges. I've been there. For one, electricians seem to have a minimum fee they will charge for changing a panel that can be upwards of $1000. Don't ask me why, I think it's a pretty straight forward job for an electrician. Maybe they just know the average DIYer can't/won't do it themselves.  

Then you may be required to pull a permit from your local authority for an upgrade. This can run upwards of $150. Additionally, the riser pipe and maybe the weather cap will need to change. In my area they will not allow a PVC riser tube (from the panel up to the weather cap) on a 400 amp drop. It must be steel. etc etc etc

Then the upgraded panel will cost more. A 400 amp panel runs about $250, and 800 amp panel can cost $1000 or more.

If you want to grow past 3 miners, I would consider adding a second panel rather than upgrading the current one. I don't know your skills, but i could mount the panel, run the riser, install the breakers, run the branch circuits and outlets myself and then just call an electrician or the power company to install the drop and the meter. You'll have two electric bills, but you might be able to get a commercial rate on the second account and save money. And you'll save thousands on the installation.

If you are converting your garage and you can put your panel on the outside wall of the garage, then you'll have short lines to pull for circuits. You don't need all this extra power for the house anyway.

There are some simple books on electrical basics at the home improvement stores. They won't make you an electrician, but you'll at least be able to pull your own branch circuits and with a little home work install a panel. It's not rocket science. Just don't buy the cheapest materials you can find (you want them to handle continuous heavy loads) and make sure you check the codes in your area.
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