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Author Topic: Trusting sellers of LARGE amounts of Bitcoins  (Read 2544 times)
casascius
Mike Caldwell
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The Casascius 1oz 10BTC Silver Round (w/ Gold B)


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February 06, 2011, 01:51:21 AM
 #21


I like Gavin's idea much better than some proprietary PDF certificate which seems to be some sort of weirdness, which people will probably perceive as even more geeky than bitcoin.


Proprietary how?  This has been a standard builtin feature of Acrobat for at least 4 major releases. It is no geekier than using https to secure your web browsing.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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February 06, 2011, 02:14:57 AM
 #22

Adobe probably keeps your private key lying around their database ready to hand over to authorities at a moments notice. Also you can easily obtain fraudulent pdf certs they are for sale on every carding forum.

Exchangers build reputation on forums, safeorscam and word of mouth for successful transactions.

Safe escrow like what Exchangezone.com uses is the best idea for large transactions, but who's to say they won't disappear one day and take all the escrow with them
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February 06, 2011, 02:37:01 AM
 #23

Adobe probably keeps your private key lying around their database ready to hand over to authorities at a moments notice. Also you can easily obtain fraudulent pdf certs they are for sale on every carding forum.

Exchangers build reputation on forums, safeorscam and word of mouth for successful transactions.

Safe escrow like what Exchangezone.com uses is the best idea for large transactions, but who's to say they won't disappear one day and take all the escrow with them

Adobe (or the CA rather) sends you a 3rd party hardware module they didnt create that generates its own keypair and then you submit a CSR and the CA signs it after the fact just like SSL.  You could buy your own crypto module all the same if you didn't trust theirs, they are very generic, and arrive blank.  (safeNet Rainbow iKey).

No one not adobe nor even the CA ever sees or possesses your private key, it doesn't exist until you generate it yourself.  Though I am very interested in learning about how one might obtain a fake cert that Acrobat trusts. (obviously anyone can self sign a cert... Just like with SSL it won't be trusted). Absent proof, I consider it FUD

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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