Bitcoin Forum
December 08, 2016, 08:00:58 AM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.13.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: MyBitcoin Back Up! (with a press release)  (Read 11482 times)
hawks5999
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 168



View Profile WWW
August 05, 2011, 07:57:12 AM
 #61

I see a lot of similarities with the MtGox hack, they got out of it stronger. This should be possible for MyBitcoin as well.

You are dreaming. MBC is going into receivership. Game. Over.

■ ▄▄▄
■ ███
■ ■  ■               
LEDGER  WALLET    ████
■■■ ORDER NOW! ■■■
              LEDGER WALLET
Smartcard security for your BTCitcoins
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■
Decentralized. Open. Secure.
1481184058
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481184058

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481184058
Reply with quote  #2

1481184058
Report to moderator
1481184058
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481184058

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481184058
Reply with quote  #2

1481184058
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1481184058
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481184058

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481184058
Reply with quote  #2

1481184058
Report to moderator
1481184058
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481184058

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481184058
Reply with quote  #2

1481184058
Report to moderator
1481184058
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481184058

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481184058
Reply with quote  #2

1481184058
Report to moderator
digigalt
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 58


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 08:09:33 AM
 #62

I see a lot of similarities with the MtGox hack, they got out of it stronger. This should be possible for MyBitcoin as well.

You are dreaming. MBC is going into receivership. Game. Over.

What is it about BitCoin users that compels them to ask for a proverbial reach around after they've so clearly been raped?
repentance
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 840


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 08:16:17 AM
 #63

I see a lot of similarities with the MtGox hack, they got out of it stronger. This should be possible for MyBitcoin as well.

You are dreaming. MBC is going into receivership. Game. Over.

Receivers do sometimes trade businesses out of trouble rather than liquidate them, but we have no idea of the size of the hole Mybitcoin is in and whether that's a viable option.  The nature of Mybitcoin's business probably isn't going to count in favour of continuing to trade while under administration, though.

All I can say is that this is Bitcoin. I don't believe it until I see six confirmations.
willphase
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 770


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 08:54:33 AM
 #64

This post is not being seen because it's stickied... I didn't see it until someone linked it and I've seen many posts since this was written still asking about mybitcoin... Most people just skip over the stickies...

Will

julz
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1092



View Profile
August 05, 2011, 08:55:02 AM
 #65

it's an index page on the domain name mybitcoin.com ...  that means whoever wrote that has full access to his server...   It's him.

uhm, how does that follow? server might be owned.

In that case - we can't even trust that any messages signed with his private key are from him any more.
Tom seemed to use the same key to sign his personal correspondence as that which was used for mybitcoin's automatic payment notifications.

This suggests the corresponding private key was stored on the server and the mybitcoin software had access to the passphrase.

Of course if an imposter 'Tom Williams 2' was posting.. one would hope that 'Tom Williams 1' would pipe up somehow and warn us that the key was compromised.
(but if he completely lost access to his private key - he'd probably know he'd be assumed to just be a troll.... so maybe we'd hear nothing)

That's the double edged sword of anonymity.
In some cases Mr anonymous 1's digital world can be usurped by Mr anonymous 2 with no recourse.
Anonymous identities vulnerable to identity theft.. how about that.

That he shared his key with an automated system, and didn't properly participate in a web of trust is an indication that really.. his signing of messages was little more than a marketing ploy to make us think he took security seriously.













@electricwings   BM-GtyD5exuDJ2kvEbr41XchkC8x9hPxdFd
Grouver (BtcBalance)
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 530



View Profile WWW
August 05, 2011, 09:08:32 AM
 #66

it's an index page on the domain name mybitcoin.com ...  that means whoever wrote that has full access to his server...   It's him.

uhm, how does that follow? server might be owned.

Hope this isn't true.
Then the Tom Williams impostor can create a claim page installing loads of shit on your computer.

makomk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 686


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 09:12:34 AM
 #67

I called it. This is basically exactly what I've been theorizing happened. After MtGox got a lot of criticism for explaining before they knew the facts, it only makes sense that MyBitcoin (or anyone else exploited) would keep silent until they had a good idea what was going on.
That's not why MtGox got criticism. MtGox released specific statements that not just turned out to be premature and wrong, but that they had to have known were false at the time; for example, there's no way they could honestly have claimed both that it was just a single account that was compromised and that they had enough Bitcoin funds to cover their deposits because even from the outside it was easy to see they didn't have enough Bitcoins to cover the amount in that single account, let alone everyone else's deposits.

Quad XC6SLX150 Board: 860 MHash/s or so.
SIGS ABOUT BUTTERFLY LABS ARE PAID ADS
repentance
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 840


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 09:13:14 AM
 #68

Hope this isn't true.
Then the Tom Williams impostor can create a claim page installing loads of shit on your computer.

One more reason to wait and see whether there's any statement forthcoming naming a receiver.

All I can say is that this is Bitcoin. I don't believe it until I see six confirmations.
Smalleyster
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 70


I yam what I yam. - Popeye


View Profile WWW
August 05, 2011, 09:16:16 AM
 #69

Hope this isn't true.
Then the Tom Williams impostor can create a claim page installing loads of shit on your computer.

One more reason to wait and see whether there's any statement forthcoming naming a receiver.

IMHO the only way to get real movement on this is for someone to plant his butt on Nevis and retain one of the top lawyers there. Money talks on a small island.

Feel like investing in a Miner?:
http://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=30044.msg377773#msg377773
A soup to nuts newbee system for a secure, portable USB wallet (free instructions):
NoobHowTo: http://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=27088.msg341387#msg341387
wareen
Millionaire
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 742

bitcoin-austria.at


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 09:20:08 AM
 #70

Well - this announcement could also just be a reaction from "Tom" realizing that people will eventually track him down. The community did a great job gathering bits and pieces pointing towards the real identity of mybitcoin.com's operator and IMHO we were already pretty close - props all the others from #bitcoin-police!

It is certainly easier for him to state that he was hacked (maybe even fake some convincing evidence on his servers) than to just disappear with the money and hoping to get away with it.

I'm pretty sure that's what dawned upon him during this week and that's why it took him so long to come up with this announcement. A simple "we've been hacked - please hold on while we're investigating" page soon after the incident would have been the most logical step if he did not plan on just running away.

Anyway - it doesn't matter much if he stole the money or someone else did. Finding the somewhat anonymous operator of a website is easy compared to proving that someone owns stolen Bitcoins unfortunately Sad
Binford 6100
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 504


PGP OTC WOT: EB7FCE3D


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:02:07 AM
 #71

imo there 'll be a haircut when it comes to enabling the service.
(speculation: let's assume he had 3/4 of the bitcoins offsite, 1/4 is gone; he'll not enable withdrawing 1:1 but rather get the offloaded bitcoins from backup online and enables the appropriate share of coins to be returned, with an equal loss to every account)

I wouldn't expect it to be a rapid process either.  The receiver will have to ensure that Bitcoins are being sent to valid depositors and not to false claimants or other wallets owned by the operators.  That's going to take time.

I'd imagine a period for claims, each user should login to prove s/he is the rightfull user of the service (knows the uname/pwd) and could indicate a btc address to receive the leftovers from the original btc holdings with that account. that's what I would to to reimbourse users if I'd be operating similar service. I see an option to keep the funds in the site for users who do not want to migrate away from MBC (just to make the use cases list complete). I'll revisit in a few days to see eventual progress.

it interests me, wether the attacking party moved coins away from the site or just to an internal account. this would interest the folks with tools to analyze blockchain to trace them. and also what ratio of btc holdings left MBC unauthorized (what's the ratio of lost coins to total holdings)

let's see when that press release will be replaced with news or site returning to operation (if ever)

You can't build a reputation on what you are going to do.
twobits
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 336

Firstbits: 1a6taw


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:26:52 AM
 #72

This still has the feeling to me of a site that was being run by a bitcoin enthusiast who  'got hit by a bus'.    I think if the main operator of the site was not out of commission for whatever reason this type of message would have been posted sooner and with his usual MO of signing it.    The way the site failed with the breakdown of communications the some weeks before it stopped running also leads me to hang onto this idea.   If it was set up as a scam site the shut down could have been  done in a way to get more loot, no need to actually turn off the site so quickly but rather they would still allow money to trickle in for as long as they could.   If it was a discovered breach as the current letter posted says,   there would not have been the break down in communications ahead of time and the change in MO.  I still think something has happened to the operator of the site, and someone has gotten around to finding and invoking some shutdown plan he had made.

molecular
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 2142



View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:46:48 AM
 #73

Here's a google cached version of an earlier posting on the site "From the desk of Tom Williams", including PGP sig:

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:EN0mtcwBftAJ:https://www.mybitcoin.com/downloads/incident-report-2011-06-22.txt+From+the+desk+of+Tom+Williams,+operator+of+MyBitcoin.com&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=de&source=www.google.de

You really have to wonder why the current info is not signed...

I somehow doubt it's Tom Williams talking to us...

EDIT: decided to post the text here, in case google cache forgets:

Quote from: ""
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

            From the desk of Tom Williams, operator of MyBitcoin.com

                          For immediate release.

There are a lot of unanswered questions floating around on the Bitcoin
forum and other places about the recent Mtgox password leak, and theft
from the MyBitcoin system.

I will attempt to answer as many of the questions and concerns as best
as I can in order to silence the rumor-mill once and for all.

As many of you already know, Mtgox was hacked and its password file was
leaked. As soon as we heard about the leak we were closely monitoring
the system for abnormal activity, and we didn't see any.

At first glance, we didn't see any hard evidence that a password leak
had even occurred. There was just a lot of speculation to an SQL
injection vulnerability in Mtgox's site. A few clients of ours had
informed us of the forum threads, and we watched them carefully.

The following morning a client of ours sent us the download link to the
leaked Mtgox password file. We prompty downloaded the file, put up a
warning on the main page, and disabled the login.

We attempted to line up usernames from the leak, and we found a lot of
matching ones. We started locking down all of those accounts using a
script that we had to have written at a moment's notice. It was during
this time that we noticed a flurry of spends happening. Yes, even with
the site disabled.

The attacker had active sessions open to the site. We quickly flushed
them and the spends stopped abruptly. We disabled the SCI, all payment
forwarding, and all receipt URL traffic on all of the usernames in the
Mtgox leak.

We proceeded to change the password on every account where the username
matched our system's database. PGP-signed emails went out to all of the
accounts that we changed the password on. If an account didn't have an
email address or had already been compromised we put up a bulletin.
(Email addresses were mandatory when we opened our service initially,
but people complained that it wasn't truly anonymous so we made them
optional. Unfortunately this makes contacting a security-compromised
customer impossible.)

An investigation was conducted at that time, and we determined that the
attacker had opened up a session to each active user/password pair ahead
of time, solved the captcha, and used some sort of bot to maintain a
connection so our system wouldn't timeout on the session. It was likely
his intent to gain access to more accounts than he did, but as soon as
he noticed that we had changed the main page of the site he sprung into
action by sending a flurry of spends.

(Before you ask: no, we don't limit logins per IP address. We can't. We
have a lot of users that come in from Tor and I2P that all appear to
share the same source IP address.)

We've concluded that around 1% of the users on the leaked Mtgox password
file had their Bitcoins stolen on MyBitcoin. It is unfortunate, and a
horrible experience for the Bitcoin community in general.

The IP address that the attacker used was a Tor exit node and the spends
were to an address that is outside of our system.

Now to address the rumors:

No, our database wasn't compromised. We had a 3rd party company audit
our site for SQL injection attacks and we passed. (We did, however, have
one XSS hole in the address book page last month that would allow an
attacker to insert fake entries into a customer's address book. It was
promptly fixed and offending address book entries were purged. Not a
single customer had spent to the fake address book entries.) Every line
of code was audited last month. Literally line by line audited by
professionals, and it was deemed safe.

No, this site isn't being ran by some amateur that just learned how to
program computers. It was created by seasoned programmers that
understand security.

Yes, we use password encryption. We are currently using SHA-256, but
since the recent Mtgox hack we will be upgrading that to something
stronger. It's surprising how many sites still use MD5, even though it
was broken years ago. It is my personal opinion that MD5 be deprecated
from modern operating systems.

We also use whole-disk level encryption on every single one of our
servers. When you fail a disk in a NOC and a level 1 technician replaces
it does he wipe the disk before the RMA/tossing it in the garbage? Not
usually! We know these mistakes happen, so we take precautions. Any and
all servers with an IP KVM on them are ran in secure console mode. The
root passwords are required even for single user mode. All disk keys are
held off-site and were never generated anywhere near the internet. All
server passwords are unique per server and per user, of course. Only two
technicians have access to the secure servers. This access is over a VPN
and we only use secured workstations running Linux and BSD to access
them.

We use BSD servers with MAC, immutable flags, jails, PAX, SSP,
randomized mmap, secure level, a WAF, a DDoS mitigation and alert system
- -- the works. Like I said earlier. We are not amateurs. In fact,
combined we have over 30 years of experience in the payment
processing (credit card arena) industry.

A large amount of the Bitcoin holding is in cold (offline) storage. We
only have a percentage of the holding available hot. This is done for
obvious reasons.

Going forward we are implementing a 2-factor login system,
user-configurable spend limits, better session token tumbling, and a
bunch of new SCI features.

Wishing the Bitcoin community all the best and a swift recovery, and
sincerely yours,


Tom Williams

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG/MBC v1.0

iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJOAki5AAoJEJ+5g06lAnqF3tcH/0QNKf7aBEg08vML9MCkwTjF
VCoTAPzVaVsdbZOqiRwE2/6420tcFZrsWTXYZYbjXckEiYrl7/DQ2XsLyhk4W567
T1sOCmpH99Z2/VAvTfAd5obRTEGpMQ0SLIrfznyc8MmG4C1GvtVUr4jM79asPmRY
jsIn7v53o9Ra1sN3QcvMskRUU1JmqfqU6MlJrYwXrtc/P9Tjm7D3AtsjfvJRX12Z
9g5y1N+zRGVpp7OK35VFnfmIKtOOtb3IMgG5EhiUllsoXKfz1eE08v4f4d0aQstL
+HGMi3PktL1HBpIRni2n4MAaIXq/EyzxDSzkSHp6v032H70c1kkUibL//QNxQuM=
=VaXC
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

PGP key molecular F9B70769 fingerprint 9CDD C0D3 20F8 279F 6BE0  3F39 FC49 2362 F9B7 0769
julz
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1092



View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:49:04 AM
 #74

Here's a google cached version of an earlier posting on the site "From the desk of Tom Williams", including PGP sig:

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:EN0mtcwBftAJ:https://www.mybitcoin.com/downloads/incident-report-2011-06-22.txt+From+the+desk+of+Tom+Williams,+operator+of+MyBitcoin.com&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=de&source=www.google.de

You really have to wonder why the current info is not signed...

I somehow doubt it's Tom Williams talking to us...


But what is a signature using a private key that was shared with a compromised server worth anyway?

@electricwings   BM-GtyD5exuDJ2kvEbr41XchkC8x9hPxdFd
molecular
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 2142



View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:52:32 AM
 #75

what the hell... there's a signed version somehow after all... I'm confused now:

https://www.mybitcoin.com/downloads/incident-report-2011-06-22.txt (it displays the current text, not the one from 6/22)

https://www.mybitcoin.com/index.txt

Huh


PGP key molecular F9B70769 fingerprint 9CDD C0D3 20F8 279F 6BE0  3F39 FC49 2362 F9B7 0769
julz
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1092



View Profile
August 05, 2011, 10:58:33 AM
 #76

what the hell... there's a signed version somehow after all... I'm confused now:

https://www.mybitcoin.com/downloads/incident-report-2011-06-22.txt (it displays the current text, not the one from 6/22)

https://www.mybitcoin.com/index.txt

Huh



Signature checks out ok.  It's been signed by the same private key as previous messages - and as the payment notifications.

(still no proof it's not a hacker who stole the private key ..   but we've got little option but to assume it's the original 'Tom Williams' I guess)




@electricwings   BM-GtyD5exuDJ2kvEbr41XchkC8x9hPxdFd
wumpus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 798

No Maps for These Territories


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 12:22:31 PM
 #77

This explains part of the big drop as well; the people that stole "a large amount of Bitcoins" from "one of our pooled holding servers" probably were in a hurry to sell it off.

Too bad Tom Williams didn't simply work together with MtGox and other exchanges to get the coins back, but instead decided to disappear for a week.

Bitcoin Core developer [PGP] Warning: For most, coin loss is a larger risk than coin theft. A disk can die any time. Regularly back up your wallet through FileBackup Wallet to an external storage or the (encrypted!) cloud. Use a separate offline wallet for storing larger amounts.
stsbrad
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 168

Brad Willman, SSCP, LTCP, MCTS,SCE,BCE


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 12:47:23 PM
 #78

I don't know why but something just doesnt feel right about this entire situation. the letter is not convincing
me of anything.
Binford 6100
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 504


PGP OTC WOT: EB7FCE3D


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 01:05:32 PM
 #79

That's not why MtGox got criticism. MtGox released specific statements that not just turned out to be premature and wrong, but that they had to have known were false at the time; for example, there's no way they could honestly have claimed both that it was just a single account that was compromised and that they had enough Bitcoin funds to cover their deposits because even from the outside it was easy to see they didn't have enough Bitcoins to cover the amount in that single account, let alone everyone else's deposits.

well, it seems that only 1 account got boosted with 500.000 btclike trade units and being ordered to sell at mtgox (so the 1 compromised account claim coud be truth) & they did not have to have bitcoins matching the number of trade units added to that account, just enough to cover lost bitcoins due to withdrawal. this number we do not know, but seems mtgox refunded everyone. imo also the second claim could be truth. added trade units in a DB of the trading system =/= actual bitcoins. until withdrawals happened everything was an mtgox internal db records of trades.

that's why it is important to know if the MBC attacker managed to get coins out of the service, because that's the damage done. simply service being not available is just inconvenience, as long all bitcoin accounts hold their balance.

pitty he did not warn exchanges on time.

You can't build a reputation on what you are going to do.
stsbrad
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 168

Brad Willman, SSCP, LTCP, MCTS,SCE,BCE


View Profile
August 05, 2011, 01:10:02 PM
 #80

he finds out he got hacked and turns off withdrawls for a few days and lets you deposit. he's quiet for a week? you needed that much time to decide you got owned? or you needed that much time to plant logs on servers because you knew the heat was coming? you didn't contact authorities yourself? no FBI? wtf? you just throw up your hands and say receivership? I call serious bullshit on this Tom Williams and am so sorry for all you guys who lost money. expensive lesson.
Pages: « 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!