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Author Topic: What is an Airdrop  (Read 71 times)
PhilippeKrypto
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May 05, 2018, 08:30:30 PM
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What are the airdrop
The method behind the madness, though, is a decision regarding marketing strategy. As a way to spread awareness to the relevant audience of potential investors and eventual enthusiasts, coin teams will, from time-to-time, do airdrops.
A Brief History of Airdrops

Coins have been doing this for a while — pretty much since the first Ethereum ICO. If you check your wallet on Etherscan (which I totally recommend doing — never open your wallet with a private key just to check your balance, it’s riskier than necessary), you’ll know there’s a row up top named Token Tracker. If you see it, then there are also tokens in your account; if you don’t, then you don’t have any tokens or airdrops — yet.
Some of you ETH wallet holders that have had wallets with balances for a while now might’ve noticed this — one day you just see an extra random token in your Token Tracker. No, someone didn’t randomly deposit some obscure token into your wallet address on accident; instead, the coin’s team decided to send a small amount to a population of Ethereum wallets in order to spread the word.
After getting the token, one of the first things you might’ve done is Google what the coin is. Or you might’ve taken it a step further — asked someone else if they knew what the token was. Also, you could just choose to ignore it.
Of course, in the last scenario, the airdrop failed its intention. But scenario 1 means that you have now learned about the coin, and scenario 2 is even better — you’ve just told your friends about the coin, too. In both of those scenarios, the airdrop did its job for a small price (well, potentially a larger price if it moons).
Eventually, airdrops became a method beyond marketing. As a method to pump coin value, coins would announce airdrops where coin holders would receive bonus coins proportional to the amount of total coins they hold. Coin investors that wanted to get the airdrop would have to buy the coins if they didn’t have any yet, or buy more if they wanted a larger proportion of the airdrop. That being said, I want to emphasize that this airdrop strategy won’t be examined further in this article, since my article is focused on how you can get coins for free, not on how you can get coins by buying coins.
Recently, with Facebook’s new advertising policy explicitly stating bans for ICOs, many ICOs have turned to airdrops as an alternative method for pay-per-click advertising. With many ICOs being consumer-focused products, they focus on one metric: viral growth through the network effect. In layman’s terms, they want to spread the word to you and hope that you spread the word to your minions, too. They address this by using a strong referral system method.
 
An Ethereum Wallet: not one that is on an exchange. It has to be a personal address that is ERC20 compatible because most of the tokens that are airdropped are ERC20 tokens, which are or were originally Ethereum-based ICOs. I suggest using MetaMask or MyEtherWallet ( https://www.myetherwallet.com )to get started immediately, but in the long-term I always recommend getting a hardware wallet like the Ledger Nano S.
 
The Ethereum Wallet Must be ACTIVE. By active, I mean that you have to show at least some human use of it. Lots of airdrops have checks in place to make sure that you aren’t just randomly generating a bunch of addresses and signing them all up to unfairly obtain more coins. This means that if your wallet doesn’t show activity, it might not receive the airdrop. Sometimes, coins will be explicit in what they look for, including some type of balance in the account.
A Telegram Account (https://t.me/PhilippeBertrand): I’m sure there are amazing reasons why Telegram is the chatting tool of choice for many of these ICOs. The coins want to boost the audience count. Usually, these airdrop coins will also require you to sign up for their Telegram accounts. Until you receive the coin in your Ethereum wallet, do not leave the Telegram accounts or you risk disqualification for the airdrop.
 
A Twitter Account( https://twitter.com/Philippe_krypto )Similar to the reasons behind the Telegram account, many of the airdrop coins will also require you to follow them on Twitter. Some of them will even ask you to retweet some tweet.
An email address. sometimes airdrops will ask for your email, too. If you don’t feel comfortable with giving them your real email, just create a spam one. Remember the password, though; some of them actually ask you to confirm your email.
 
A Facebook account
https://www.facebook.com/ecoressources/?_rdc=1&_rdr
 
A Bitcoin Talk account
PhilippeKrypto
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=1975474
 
A Medium account
https://medium.com/philippebertrand_94561
https://www.medium.com/@philippebertrand_94561
@philippebertrand_94561
 
A Reddit account
https://www.reddit.com/user/philippe-krypto
PhilippeKrypto

A Instagram account

https://www.instagram.com/philippesalykiev/
 
A Altcoins Talk
https://www.altcoinstalks.com/index.php?action=profile;u=25846
Philippe_Krypto
 
A Linkedin Account
https://www.linkedin.com/in/philippe-bertrand-570532a/
 
Don’t Get Scammed
With all the promises of free coins out there, it’s easy to lose track of everything and just start a clicking frenzy. Here are some tips to avoid getting scammed:
 
Never send any private keys. No one needs to have your private key in order to be able to check you wallet balance. They can do so very easily with tools like Etherscan.
Don’t send any money to any addresses. Remember this — airdrops are free. Whether it requires you to be holding a certain coin, or if it’ll just appear in your wallet, an airdrop will never ask you to send any amount of some coin to some type of address. If they ask for this, steer away immediately.
Check official sources. If a coin is actually doing an airdrop, it is likely they’ll have announced it on their official social media accounts, such as Twitter. Check there to make sure that the airdrop is official; otherwise, you might be subject to a scam with scammers trying to collect your data.
This is an example of a scam airdrop. The first red flag is the fact that the Twitter account is asking you for an amount.
 
The image is a terrible Photoshop job with font that doesn’t match the rest of the announcement. This scam is a metropolis of red flags. A simple Reverse Google Image Search shows that the logo actually belongs to Thrive.
 
As a best practice, always look for reasons why an Airdrop would be a scam. With that mindset, you are more likely to be able to sniff out the rotting fish from the sushi.





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Mosesayo4450
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May 21, 2018, 11:14:56 PM
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Nice information,  thanks for bringing up such an interesting topic.
vanhuy
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May 22, 2018, 02:58:01 PM
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Simple answer: literally it is free money waiting for you.
The method behind the madness of issuing free coins is a decision related marketing strategy. As a way to propagate awareness to the stakeholders of potential investors and money supporters, issuers sometimes conduct airdrops.
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