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Author Topic: [DESIGN] Custom-Built Lexan / Aluminum Mining Case  (Read 6623 times)
catfish
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September 11, 2011, 04:34:49 PM
 #41

That's the best rig in terms of industrial design I've seen so far. Fantastic work old chap, it's *really* impressive.

The proof of the pudding for mining rigs, though, is in the thermodynamics and stability at decent overclocks - and your data showing that you can keep a bunch of 5830s (which get hotter than my 5850s, by a LONG way) appear to show that the rig isn't just a good looker - it performs adequately too.

Damn - I want to redesign and rebuild my 3 frame rigs (already rebuilt three times each and placed in varying orientations!) now - mine are embarrassing in comparison (they're in the big frame rig build thread)... Smiley


So many people ignore the importance of industrial design. Apple get a lot of shit thrown their way, but their hardware is both functional *and* attractive. Sometimes, a design that looks damn good also performs well... Damn it - when I've finished this tax return I'm going to comprehensively redesign my rigs. I *like* the combination of wood and metal... but your ally and polycarb construction reminds me immediately of the Apple G4 Cube. I've got one on my desk, though it's too underpowered to do any mining Smiley

And as most know, the G4 Cube is in the New York Museum of Modern Art as a permanent exhibit. I'd agree with Stryker's claim that your rig is art - there are aspects which are clearly an expression of aesthetics rather than *merely* appropriate for the job. For example - the polycarb could have been plain transparent 'perspex'... but the choice of frosted / translucent sections makes it *look* so much better. And if you just used the frosted stuff because it was the only material you could find, or that it was the cheapest, then hell - it's *still* art. Call it subconscious aesthetic selection. Cheesy

Since your rig is so exceptionally well designed, are you involved with industrial design in your career?


Finally, who'd have thought it? That plastic kid turns up to thread-crap again. Wow, anyone see a pattern emerging here?  Roll Eyes

...so I give in to the rhythm, the click click clack
I'm too wasted to fight back...


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loglow
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September 13, 2011, 05:53:16 AM
 #42

So many people ignore the importance of industrial design.

I strongly agree with you. I think many products are over-designed, to the point of being toy-like.

...if you just used the frosted stuff because it was the only material you could find, or that it was the cheapest...

my choices were basically acrylic (plexiglass) or polycarb (lexan). acrylic is shit to work with; it melts and cracks. polycarb is much easier to cut and shape. a 1' x 2' sheet of acrylic is $9, and the same size sheet of lexan is $12; it's worth the extra 3 bucks. also, both come clear. the frosted comes from sanding the lexan with 150 grit sandpaper (w/ a handheld random-orbital). the one downside of lexan is that it scratches easily, so the decision to sand it was initially a practical one: if it's going to get scratched, why not pre-scratch it?

are you involved with industrial design in your career?

not exactly. my career at the moment is uncertain. I was in hollywood vfx for three years, but ended up leaving because of a health issue and because I hated los angeles. at the moment I'm taking woodworking and cabinetry courses. I've also started designing and building lamps, as well as some furniture. how all that will translate into a career is still up in the air, but at least my expenses are a fraction of what they were in the city.

anyway, thank you so much for the kind words. Smiley
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September 13, 2011, 06:16:48 AM
 #43

after receiving the new fans and grills in the mail, I modified the top panel to hold them. I also modified the rear panel so the grills would fit, but ended up scrapping it and making a new one because the modified one was extremely narrow in a few places. I adjusted the layout of the six fans and also removed three of the aluminum beams that had been supporting them. the result--with the fans being supported by the lexan panel alone--is just as sturdy, but simpler, lighter, and cleaner looking.

with this setup: fan speeds are now consistent across all four cards, and are lower by about 5% overall. the box is still nice and quiet because the additional case fans are still quieter than the video card fans at higher speeds. the new fans are gelid wing14s (140mm). the original six are wing12s (120mm). I'm very impressed with the quality of these fans.

the only remaining concern I have is thinking about dust prevention for the open slot on the front of the case, and the intake fans. any ideas?




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September 15, 2011, 02:34:33 AM
 #44

can always try dryer sheets - they keep dust on them... just put them over your intake and exhaust fans...

the only other thing i kept on thinking about is.. if the cards were to exhaust up and intake is from bottom... would that sound weird?
(hope didn't sidetrack the thread)...
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September 16, 2011, 05:10:45 AM
 #45

can always try dryer sheets

thanks for the tip

if the cards were to exhaust up and intake is from bottom

this would make a lot of sense, since hot air likes to rise, and it's something I've thought about too. the reasons I have it running this way at the moment are: a) I want negative pressure overall so there aren't any pockets of hot air, and b) because I have the rig next to a window, and having the exhaust coming out horizontally allows me to vent the heated air directly outside.
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September 16, 2011, 05:27:36 AM
 #46

I think you'll find getting cool air to the fans on the cards in any way possible is paramount.

Yes, hot air does like to rise.  In a building, in a tent, in a room with still air, etc. 

With the amount of air you're moving through this case the heat doesn't really have enough time to 'settle' to the top.  You're probably not going to get much cooler at this point unless you plug an air conditioner directly into the intake Wink

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loglow
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September 16, 2011, 05:29:07 PM
 #47

With the amount of air you're moving through this case the heat doesn't really have enough time to 'settle' to the top.  You're probably not going to get much cooler at this point unless you plug an air conditioner directly into the intake

The fans have been running at an average speed of 42-48%, both day and night... satisfied with the cooling ability of this rig  Grin
dovewing2000
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September 16, 2011, 07:29:58 PM
 #48

do the top fans exhaust the air out or pull air in?
loglow
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September 16, 2011, 08:22:03 PM
 #49

do the top fans exhaust the air out or pull air in?

The top fans (140mm, ~90CFM x2 = ~180CFM) are intake.
The rear fans (120mm, ~60CFM x6 = ~360CFM) are exhaust.
stryker
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September 18, 2011, 10:13:02 AM
 #50

would love to see footage of a high speed camera looking in the front of your rig as smoke is added via the top intakes  Grin
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