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Author Topic: Afghanistan  (Read 3358 times)
NghtRppr
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September 26, 2011, 07:32:03 PM
 #21

So, when you own land in California, is it really your land like, say, a sofa is? I know that I can remove a cushion from my sofa. But can a landowner remove any oak tree from their parcel of land anywhere in California? If not, why not?

Hmm. Something is going on here. Maybe owning a parcel of land in California is not like owning a sofa.

You can take the cushion off the sofa, but god help you if you cut that tag off the cushion...

So maybe land is like a sofa...if you are a 14-year-old trollmod.

I'm a college student and the only person trolling here is you. You suck at it too.
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FirstAscent
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September 27, 2011, 02:14:38 AM
 #22

So, when you own land in California, is it really your land like, say, a sofa is? I know that I can remove a cushion from my sofa. But can a landowner remove any oak tree from their parcel of land anywhere in California? If not, why not?

Hmm. Something is going on here. Maybe owning a parcel of land in California is not like owning a sofa.

You can take the cushion off the sofa, but god help you if you cut that tag off the cushion...

So maybe land is like a sofa...if you are a 14-year-old trollmod.

I'm a college student and the only person trolling here is you. You suck at it too.

And what is your major? After answering that, feel free to address ownership of land.
NghtRppr
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September 27, 2011, 02:24:04 AM
 #23

So, when you own land in California, is it really your land like, say, a sofa is? I know that I can remove a cushion from my sofa. But can a landowner remove any oak tree from their parcel of land anywhere in California? If not, why not?

Hmm. Something is going on here. Maybe owning a parcel of land in California is not like owning a sofa.

You can take the cushion off the sofa, but god help you if you cut that tag off the cushion...

So maybe land is like a sofa...if you are a 14-year-old trollmod.

I'm a college student and the only person trolling here is you. You suck at it too.

And what is your major? After answering that, feel free to address ownership of land.

I major in Computer Science, with a minor in Mathematics. I also have credits from Oxford University in philosophy.

I'll let you come up with your own argument for why owning land and other kinds of property should be considered different kinds of ownership and how that's relevant. You seem keen to play the skeptic but once you make a claim, you should back it up.
FirstAscent
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September 27, 2011, 02:29:01 AM
 #24

So, when you own land in California, is it really your land like, say, a sofa is? I know that I can remove a cushion from my sofa. But can a landowner remove any oak tree from their parcel of land anywhere in California? If not, why not?

Hmm. Something is going on here. Maybe owning a parcel of land in California is not like owning a sofa.

You can take the cushion off the sofa, but god help you if you cut that tag off the cushion...

So maybe land is like a sofa...if you are a 14-year-old trollmod.

I'm a college student and the only person trolling here is you. You suck at it too.

And what is your major? After answering that, feel free to address ownership of land.

Computer Science and with a minor in Mathematics. I also have credits from Oxford University in philosophy.

I'll let you come up with your own argument for why owning land and other kinds of property should be considered different kinds of ownership and how that's relevant. You seem keen to play the skeptic but once you make a claim, you should back it up.

I don't need to come up with an idea to energize the discussion here. Certain ideas are already in implementation. I posted rather recently here about ownership of land in California. If you wish, pretend that's my idea because I agree with it. However, it's real, so you might want to address it in that context.

Computer science: write a simulator and apply GP using functions encoded as s-expressions which will let you evolve solutions to political problems.
NghtRppr
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September 27, 2011, 02:33:23 AM
 #25

I don't need to come up with an idea to energize the discussion here.

I said argument, not idea. You made a claim, back it up.
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September 27, 2011, 02:49:29 AM
 #26

I don't need to come up with an idea to energize the discussion here.

I said argument, not idea. You made a claim, back it up.

Not yet. Obviously, reasoning already exists, hence the law. You are free to now explain your opinion of it.
NghtRppr
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September 27, 2011, 02:55:37 AM
 #27

I don't need to come up with an idea to energize the discussion here.

I said argument, not idea. You made a claim, back it up.

Not yet. Obviously, reasoning already exists, hence the law. You are free to now explain your opinion of it.

Let me know when you want to back up your claim. Until then, stop wasting my time.
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September 27, 2011, 02:59:39 AM
 #28

I don't need to come up with an idea to energize the discussion here.

I said argument, not idea. You made a claim, back it up.

Not yet. Obviously, reasoning already exists, hence the law. You are free to now explain your opinion of it.

Let me know when you want to back up your claim. Until then, stop wasting my time.

Don't be a dick. Let's assume I'm not making any claim. File your grievances with the state of California. They're regulating property owners. Ownership of your property in California is not like owning a sofa. What is your take on it?
NghtRppr
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September 27, 2011, 03:02:20 AM
 #29

Let's assume I'm not making any claim.

But you are. Why do I have to do all the work while you go "ZOMG NUKES"? Let me poke holes in your arguments for a change. At the very least you can see how it feels to make a logical argument. I think you could use the practice.

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September 28, 2011, 04:04:53 AM
 #30

I actually don't think the mathematics are complex. Actually, one of the big obstacles I see are the auto manufacturers' objections to it, where they would claim that a competitor slipped in a couple autos that made the top tier, thus knocking the auto maker's models further down, and giving them a very stressful year. The key is to smooth out the process for everyone.

Perhaps newly released models get slipped into the middle tiers regardless of specs, and are given a six to ten months or so to migrate to their respective slot, giving the auto makers some time to adjust to the constantly changing market. If the model is inefficient, at least the auto maker has an opportunity to compete before it gets knocked down. And if it's seriously efficient, at least the other auto makers get a chance to sell their models at a slight advantage for a short period of time.

I know it can work, one way or another, and I know it's necessary too. Auto makers just aren't being forced to compete effectively - it's analogous to an oligopoly, in a sense: "Don't rock the boat too much, fellows - keep our customers believing that heavy and not so efficient is the best we can do - sell them fashion and glamor - don't make the efficient cars too comfortable - we need to get everyone to want to buy into the heavier and bigger!"

I'm glad Volkswagen is daring to be different, and as a result, showing what is really possible.

It makes me want to puke when I see you talking about how you'd like to run other people's businesses and control their lives.

Horrible, isn't it? Getting the auto makers to actually compete and deliver what is technologically possible. Perhaps we can regulate them to add a dispenser in the door which provides barf bags.
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October 01, 2011, 10:05:05 PM
 #31

Grin

Man up and grow a pair. Move to Afghanistan and set up your business there. I promise that you won't be bothered by the big bad government.
None of that horrid infrastructure, education, protection or other nasty stuff to worry about.

Or quit bitching because you have to contribute, just like everybody else.

And if you like government regulation so much, why don't you grow some balls and move to North Korea? I promise that you wont be bothered by that irritating concept of individual liberty and it's annoying advocates, libertarians.  You'll get plenty of education, protection and will get to take part in the huge "We Love the Dictator" celebrations that they have.

Or quit bitching because you dont get to trample everyones rights and don't get to control their lives.

Since when did you become a straw-burning troll, JA17? I am disappoint.
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October 02, 2011, 08:06:08 AM
 #32


Afghanistan outlawed opium manufacture and production because of the perceived plague such drugs has brought to its people. This decreased the world supply of opium, thus decreased profit from said opium by an equal amount. After they outlawed opium, Afghanistan fell to single digit percentages of world supply. Now its back up to 75%-95% of world supply. Opium trade proceeds fund world governments, corporate, and world banking interests. It is an interesting fact that shortly after the outlawing of opium, they were invaded via the war on terror, then after the new friendly government was installed, they were back up to the leading world supply of opium, ironically just in time for the next growing season and harvest.

Afghanistan has been considered a critical strategic geographic trade location for the region for centuries because of its warm water port to the Caspian Sea. Russian military, political, and historian figures have stated that the USSR invaded it when trade negotiations broke down back prior to the russian invasion for its warm water port and arguably for a piece of the drug profits pie becasue of its crumbling economy and infrastructure that eventually led to the dissolution of the USSR.

Global trade and oil interests tried to negotiate with Afghanistan to run a pipeline to the Caspian Sea and to use the warm water port for trade and drug shipments. Afghanistan denied them. Shortly thereafter, there was a worldwide propaganda campaign against the Taliban and Afghanistan that fueled world outrage against them that led to the war on terror and the invasion of Afghanistan.

Today, they are working on the pipeline and global trade now runs through the warm water port at the Caspian Sea, thanks to the friendly government installed in Afghanistan and the beautiful gift known as democracy that Afghanistan never asked for.


"... He is no fool who parts with that which he cannot keep, when he is sure to be recompensed with that which he cannot lose ..."

"... history disseminated to the masses is written by those who win battles and wars and murder their heroes ..."


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JA37
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October 03, 2011, 07:23:19 AM
 #33

And if you like government regulation so much, why don't you grow some balls and move to North Korea? I promise that you wont be bothered by that irritating concept of individual liberty and it's annoying advocates, libertarians.  You'll get plenty of education, protection and will get to take part in the huge "We Love the Dictator" celebrations that they have.

Or quit bitching because you dont get to trample everyones rights and don't get to control their lives.

Since when did you become a straw-burning troll, JA17? I am disappoint.

The quote was a response to a claim that "OMG everything is the governments fault. EVERYTHING". I just pointed out again, that if you don't like governments there are several places in the world where you won't be bothered by a government.
I have NEVER, nor will I EVER, advocate totalitarian rule. I am very strong believer in democracy and personal liberty, although I see that both need to be regulated to be beneficial. As long as you live in a society you will have to adapt to that fact.
Extremism is bad, in every colour, shape or form it presents itself. That goes for both the extreme form of government rule, as in North Korea, and it's counterpart, a complete lack of government rule.
Who decides what's extreme? We do. "We the people ..." to borrow from the US constitution.

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October 03, 2011, 07:47:38 AM
 #34

*troll shits in this thread*

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NghtRppr
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October 03, 2011, 07:54:03 AM
 #35

Extremism is bad, in every colour, shape or form it presents itself. That goes for both the extreme form of government rule, as in North Korea, and it's counterpart, a complete lack of government rule.

There would still be governments under libertarianism. The difference is that they would be forced to compete with each other rather than allowed to stagnate. By forcing governments to compete, it is exactly "we the people" that get to decide what shape the government takes.
hashman
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October 03, 2011, 02:40:17 PM
 #36

Afghanistan was far better off without the US government, that's for sure.

Wow...in your meager 17 years on this earth, you have managed to become quite omniscient. When did you spend time there before the US occupation? How long? What do you remember most?


I think it is not "omniscient" but "empathetic";  being able to imagine what it would be like with a foreign invading army in your town, taking all the farming profits and doing the things young guys with guns and uniforms are likely to do.  Imagine the thousands of people who would answer with "yes, I was better off when my family was alive".  However, empathy requires thought, something generally discouraged in political propaganda from all sides. 

 
FredericBastiat
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October 03, 2011, 05:00:09 PM
 #37

I have NEVER, nor will I EVER, advocate totalitarian rule. I am very strong believer in democracy and personal liberty, although I see that both need to be regulated to be beneficial. As long as you live in a society you will have to adapt to that fact.

Extremism is bad, in every colour, shape or form it presents itself. That goes for both the extreme form of government rule, as in North Korea, and it's counterpart, a complete lack of government rule.
Who decides what's extreme? We do. "We the people ..." to borrow from the US constitution.

I'd like to clear up a few things in your response. You've mentioned what appears to be three different types of government (democratic, republican, libertarian, and totalitarian)

None are particularly compatible with each other. Libetarians respect the personal liberties of the individual above that of any ruling elite (all other governing). Democracies erode some personal liberties to pander to the masses.

A republican government tries to represent the rule of law thru delegation of authority to legislators, adjudicators, and executors who represent a majority but violate contract to do it, even though they say otherwise. I assume you're referring to the US constitution and the Declaration of Independence where it mentions "consent to be governed". It would be a great idea except that the consent part was taken away, hence no competition, contract or consent.

Totalitarian governments is where all other governments end up eventually given enough lattitude. I hate compromising any personal liberties for any reasons. People get hurt when you do that.

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FirstAscent
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October 03, 2011, 06:34:49 PM
 #38

None are particularly compatible with each other. Libetarians respect the personal liberties of the individual above that of any ruling elite (all other governing). Democracies erode some personal liberties to pander to the masses.

And libertarians don't offer up unified and consistent protection of systems which will break down when divided, all so arbitrary rights can be awarded to each individual.
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October 03, 2011, 06:41:50 PM
 #39

Extremism is bad, in every colour, shape or form it presents itself. That goes for both the extreme form of government rule, as in North Korea, and it's counterpart, a complete lack of government rule.

There would still be governments under libertarianism. The difference is that they would be forced to compete with each other rather than allowed to stagnate. By forcing governments to compete, it is exactly "we the people" that get to decide what shape the government takes.

Isn't that exactly what you have in Afghanistan?  Lots of competing "governments" one of which is US backed, one of which is Indian backed and one of which is Pakistan backed.  How exactly does that benefit the Afghans?

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October 03, 2011, 06:47:00 PM
 #40

Afghanistan outlawed opium manufacture and production because of the perceived plague such drugs has brought to its people. This decreased the world supply of opium, thus decreased profit from said opium by an equal amount.

Do you mean increased? When demand remains constant and supply falls, profits increase.
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