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Author Topic: How to create a PULL request  (Read 89009 times)
freedomno1
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May 17, 2013, 10:28:56 PM
 #21

Well just got it
Still a bit technical need to keep learning
Thanks for the info  Grin

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Cryddit
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November 02, 2013, 06:11:13 PM
 #22

I'm having a fight with git. 

Here's what I want to do. 

I want to throw away all local changes, including those committed to the local git repository, and make my project directories look exactly like the ones that were most recently checked into the remote master, from a different git repository. 

That is, with NO attempt to "merge" local changes, NO local files hanging around that aren't in the upstream, NO version garbage inserted into files ... Just plain abandon this branch and go back to trunk development. 

In every other revision control system I've ever encountered, that is a simple command.  But either I am too stupid to know how the hell to ask  Git to do this, or Git is too stupid to get it done.

"Git revert" doesn't even destroy local files that aren't part of the version you're reverting to!  What the hell is wrong here?
virtualmaster
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December 12, 2013, 07:27:45 PM
 #23

Thanks for the tutorial.

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wumpus
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January 31, 2014, 12:11:31 PM
 #24

I want to throw away all local changes, including those committed to the local git repository, and make my project directories look exactly like the ones that were most recently checked into the remote master, from a different git repository.  
Code:
git reset --hard origin/master
(or replace 'origin' with whatever you called the remote)

git revert is there to revert already checked-in commits with a reverse patch. You will likely use it very sparingly, if at all.

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Cryddit
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January 31, 2014, 06:47:00 PM
 #25

Yep.  Finally figured it out about a day after I made that post.  Thanks though.

I've been getting used to Git, but it's a very annoying RCS. 

ns12123
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March 15, 2014, 11:41:48 PM
 #26

what if i pull 2 requests
mecoin
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March 16, 2014, 10:26:31 AM
 #27

For those of us that are ignorant, can somebody tell me what a PULL request in layman's terms is? And what is it used for?
it is used to request a merge of different versions of versioned files in so called "Versioning file systems"
just google for the term Smiley
SaulGray
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December 29, 2014, 08:06:55 AM
 #28

Thanks for this OP, This is something I have been interested in learning, I have been using git for a few months, but only within my own repo, so I have been avoiding learning how to do this.
btw @zulu I love using the -m flag as well,  Cheesy
readerbtc
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January 13, 2015, 01:31:25 PM
 #29

Do I need to create a pull request to suggest translation fixes?
paulhastings
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January 16, 2015, 06:40:09 AM
 #30

In simple Words, Pull requests let you tell others about changes you've pushed to a GitHub repository. Once a pull request is sent, interested parties can review the set of changes, discuss potential modifications, and even push follow-up commits if necessary.

Example:
Imagine that you built your work on your master branch on top of the v1.0 release, and want it to be integrated to the project. First you push that change to your public repository for others to see:

git push https://git.ko.xz/project master
Then, you run this command:

git request-pull v1.0 https://git.ko.xz/project master
which will produce a request to the upstream, summarizing the changes between the v1.0 release and your master, to pull it from your public repository.

If you pushed your change to a branch whose name is different from the one you have locally, e.g.

git push https://git.ko.xz/project master:for-linus
then you can ask that to be pulled with

git request-pull v1.0 https://git.ko.xz/project master:for-linus
cr1776
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March 25, 2015, 11:01:40 AM
 #31

Hi

Please show me how to sign up Gibhub .I don't know how to use it

Thanks !

A good start:
https://help.github.com/articles/set-up-git/

if you get stuck, lots of people will be able to help.  ;-)
ailsa
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April 06, 2015, 07:51:03 AM
 #32


Pull requests let u tell others about changes you have pushed to a repository on GitHub. Once a pull request is sent, interested parties can review the set of changes, discuss potential modifications, and even push follow-up commits if necessary.
BTC_Superman
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May 12, 2015, 10:27:39 AM
 #33

Thank you for the post and information.  Smiley
maheshmahi
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May 27, 2015, 07:21:55 AM
 #34

Im not clear with the pull request and github.. Can anyone say me clearly about this.. Thanks

clapcreative
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May 29, 2015, 10:27:55 AM
 #35

Code:
git commit -a -m "Check out my awesome bugfix"

This is the right method for creating pull request im using this in my every project. If you have any query then contact me via email info@clapcreative.com or +13479604186

Web Design Company Los Angeles clapcreative.com
elmasry
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June 11, 2015, 09:24:38 PM
 #36

will done
CryptoSi
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June 17, 2015, 05:50:30 AM
 #37

its not working for me
pinball8
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July 28, 2015, 05:00:43 PM
 #38

pull requests are a mechanism for a developer to notify team members that they have completed a feature. Once their feature branch is ready, the developer files a pull request via their Bitbucket account. This lets everybody involved know that they need to review the code and merge it into the master branch.

But, the pull request is more than just a notification—it’s a dedicated forum for discussing the proposed feature. If there are any problems with the changes, teammates can post feedback in the pull request and even tweak the feature by pushing follow-up commits. All of this activity is tracked directly inside of the pull request.

Git Workflows: Activity inside a pull request
Compared to other collaboration models, this formal solution for sharing commits makes for a much more streamlined workflow. SVN and Git can both automatically send notification emails with a simple script; however, when it comes to discussing changes, developers typically have to rely on email threads. This can become haphazard, especially when follow-up commits are involved. Pull requests put all of this functionality into a friendly web interface right next to your Bitbucket repositories.

Anatomy of a Pull Request
When you file a pull request, all you’re doing is requesting that another developer (e.g., the project maintainer) pulls a branch from your repository into their repository. This means that you need to provide 4 pieces of information to file a pull request: the source repository, the source branch, the destination repository, and the destination branch.

Git Workflows: Pull Requests
Many of these values will be set to a sensible default by Bitbucket. However, depending on your collaboration workflow, your team may need to specify different values. The above diagram shows a pull request that asks to merge a feature branch into the official master branch, but there are many other ways to use pull requests.

How it works

Pull requests can be used in conjunction with the Feature Branch Workflow, the Gitflow Workflow, or the Forking Workflow. But a pull request requires either two distinct branches or two distinct repositories, so they will not work with the Centralized Workflow. Using pull requests with each of these workflows is slightly different, but the general process is as follows:

A developer creates the feature in a dedicated branch in their local repo.
The developer pushes the branch to a public Bitbucket repository.
The developer files a pull request via Bitbucket.
The rest of the team reviews the code, discusses it, and alters it.
The project maintainer merges the feature into the official repository and closes the pull request.
The rest of this section describes how pull requests can be leveraged against different collaboration workflows.




you can check in
https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorials/making-a-pull-request/how-it-works
SimpleIn
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August 20, 2015, 07:28:41 PM
 #39

Me too. Thanks Gavin.

I stand by. Thanks!
andysbizz
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August 24, 2015, 03:50:27 PM
 #40

Great, thanks for the info.
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