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Author Topic: How can we tell if a Bitcoin public address is in a Bitcoin Core Desktop Wallet?  (Read 25 times)
Some Guy:
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August 24, 2018, 11:51:22 AM
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How can we tell if a Bitcoin public address is for a wallet in the Bitcoin Core Desktop Wallet program?
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August 24, 2018, 02:48:50 PM
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I believe you can't. As far as I know, addresses are generated the same way, except for the randomness part maybe.

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August 24, 2018, 02:58:34 PM
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How can we tell if a Bitcoin public address is for a wallet in the Bitcoin Core Desktop Wallet program?
I don't believe there should be any changes on address generation from wallet to wallet, only on things like segwit to non segwit.














 

 

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August 24, 2018, 03:02:52 PM
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bitcoin core like any other wallet program is creating a "bitcoin address" and that has a clear definition. it is simply hash of a public key with a specific formatting that makes the result be a string starting with 1, 3 or bc1. it doesn't matter what the wallet program is, they all do the same encoding.

imagine it like this:
you have a number that you want to represent. you have many ways.
decimal: 255
binary: 11111111
hexadeciman: FF
Base58: 5Q
Base58 with checksum: VrZDWwe

and this last way of encoding is what the bitcoin address version 1 uses. and it is shared among all the different implementation of bitcoin protocol including bitcoin core, Armory, Electrum, blockchain.info,...

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