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Author Topic: Too dangerous to draw more than 1200w on Corsair 1200 PSU?  (Read 2526 times)
mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 04:22:54 PM
 #1

It's their top of the range AX1200 and I'm drawing maybe 1220 on them at the moment. I have four.

Opinions appreciated - thanks.

Says on Corsair that max is 1204w.

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ElectricMucus
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October 29, 2011, 04:33:22 PM
 #2

It's all relative... just say one thing if insurance finds out they ain't gonna pay if the house burns down.

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October 29, 2011, 04:34:10 PM
 #3

I won't go beyond 70% of the rated
mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 04:45:46 PM
 #4

I won't go beyond 70% of the rated

Can you let me know your reasoning?

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October 29, 2011, 04:58:46 PM
 #5

Just a rule of thumb.
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October 29, 2011, 05:04:44 PM
 #6

I won't go beyond 70% of the rated

Can you let me know your reasoning?

The rating on its side?

Tell me what you think. Item says its max load is 1200 on all rails. You can look on the side of your psu and it will tell you how much it takes.
If you are over that limit. Congrats on taking your first steps into fire creation.

Also. How often in the manual, website, or anywhere does it say not to overload?

m3sSh3aD
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October 29, 2011, 05:10:19 PM
 #7

The corsair AX1200 is by far the best PSU on the market, I seen it pulling 1560 and shows very little ripple on the 12V Rail. Its a beast of a single rail PSU and it will work at 1300-1350 with its gold rating also.

YOU WONT HAVE AN ISSUE Wink Good choice, they were out of stock so i went for the Akasa HCP1200W which is so close to the corsair there isnt much between them. I run 4 5850's OC'd and a basic AMD system (athlon x2's) and it doesnt even get warm Smiley
mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 05:45:56 PM
 #8

I won't go beyond 70% of the rated

Can you let me know your reasoning?

The rating on its side?

Tell me what you think. Item says its max load is 1200 on all rails. You can look on the side of your psu and it will tell you how much it takes.
If you are over that limit. Congrats on taking your first steps into fire creation.

Also. How often in the manual, website, or anywhere does it say not to overload?

How often does it say on the inside of your microwave manual that electricity can kill you? It mostly able protecting themselves legally...

I was just wondering if it's the same case with "high quality" PSU's, that's all.

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October 29, 2011, 05:52:46 PM
 #9

If the voltage under load does not drop noticeably, the PSU is able to sustain it.

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mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 05:56:35 PM
 #10

I'm pulling about 5 or 6kW/h, our voltage should normally be at 230 but while I have everything running it's down at about 180 to 190. I got the local electricity service to see if there are other problems with the power coming in, he put in a measurement device for the last week to monitor. He is going to send me a written report.

180 isn't that low really though is it. These PSU's can operate right down to 85v I think....

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October 29, 2011, 06:15:15 PM
 #11

I'm pulling about 5 or 6kW/h, our voltage should normally be at 230 but while I have everything running it's down at about 180 to 190.

lol that's made up on the spot b.s.  Cheesy
but whatever  Roll Eyes

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worldinacoin
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October 29, 2011, 06:23:59 PM
 #12

The electricity mains in my country has a variance of +/-7%.  It is impossible to get 180-190V
mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 06:34:44 PM
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I'm pulling about 5 or 6kW/h, our voltage should normally be at 230 but while I have everything running it's down at about 180 to 190.

lol that's made up on the spot b.s.  Cheesy
but whatever  Roll Eyes

How do you think I'm mining at 8GH/s. 4 rigs at over 1200 watts each with an air conditioner using up to 2kW.

I haven't seen anyone getting 8GH from one PSU drawing more than over the 1200 watt mark. Not sure why you decided to try and take the thread off topic though with this ill thought out and pointless post.


Just to re-iterate though, my reader is showing a variance of between 180 and 190v and it should be 230. The power company thought it was very odd when I told them and they put a measurement device into my house for the last week.

We did have voltage problems in the past aswell which were "apparently" sorted out. We only found there was an issue when a new electric shower was destroyed. The transformer is close to us if that should make any difference.

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ovidiusoft
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October 29, 2011, 06:43:18 PM
 #14

The electricity mains in my country has a variance of +/-7%.  It is impossible to get 180-190V

I measured (with good equipment) anything between 150 and 270 V in a timeframe of about 3 weeks. I was curious why my equipment froze at random, UPS-es made strange noise (and one died) and so on. After that I decided not to measure anymore...
mackminer
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October 29, 2011, 06:52:21 PM
 #15

The electricity mains in my country has a variance of +/-7%.  It is impossible to get 180-190V

I measured (with good equipment) anything between 150 and 270 V in a timeframe of about 3 weeks. I was curious why my equipment froze at random, UPS-es made strange noise (and one died) and so on. After that I decided not to measure anymore...

I really hope that my PSU's don't get damaged with this variance. Can't cope with more downtime and putting more money in.

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worldinacoin
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October 30, 2011, 01:36:12 AM
 #16

Maybe you want to get a surge protector or something while waiting for your power company reply, such variance is not common.

The electricity mains in my country has a variance of +/-7%.  It is impossible to get 180-190V

I measured (with good equipment) anything between 150 and 270 V in a timeframe of about 3 weeks. I was curious why my equipment froze at random, UPS-es made strange noise (and one died) and so on. After that I decided not to measure anymore...

I really hope that my PSU's don't get damaged with this variance. Can't cope with more downtime and putting more money in.
mackminer
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October 30, 2011, 02:02:26 AM
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Maybe you want to get a surge protector or something while waiting for your power company reply, such variance is not common.

The electricity mains in my country has a variance of +/-7%.  It is impossible to get 180-190V

I measured (with good equipment) anything between 150 and 270 V in a timeframe of about 3 weeks. I was curious why my equipment froze at random, UPS-es made strange noise (and one died) and so on. After that I decided not to measure anymore...

I really hope that my PSU's don't get damaged with this variance. Can't cope with more downtime and putting more money in.

From what I've read those protectors are useless. The current needs to travel from live to neutral to have flow. I.e. through the psu where its converted to dc - I assume the converter is a complete circuit in and of itself so the psu should absorb the surge.

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worldinacoin
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October 30, 2011, 02:09:52 AM
 #18

Not really useless, but at the very least it gives you a peace of the mind Smiley .  Dealing with power companies can be tedious and pain in the neck.
mackminer
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October 30, 2011, 02:26:38 AM
 #19

Not really useless, but at the very least it gives you a peace of the mind Smiley .  Dealing with power companies can be tedious and pain in the neck.

I'm not sure they do tho, I think there a scam from.what I've read.

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mackminer
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October 30, 2011, 02:30:24 AM
 #20

Not really useless, but at the very least it gives you a peace of the mind Smiley .  Dealing with power companies can be tedious and pain in the neck.

If you want real peace of mind then a UPS with pure sine wave output is what you want, good stable power to the box at all times using one of them.


I don't think this is required either. While it will condition the incoming current, its deliberatly made dirty within the psu and and won't affect the dc. Replacement of a psu is gonna be cheaper than a ups given u lose power efficienty aswell.

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