Bitcoin Forum
December 06, 2019, 11:42:10 PM *
News: Latest Bitcoin Core release: 0.19.0.1 [Torrent]
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register More  
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: U.S. Hydrogen Economy - A requirement for a sustainable future  (Read 458 times)
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
September 24, 2018, 11:32:55 PM
Last edit: November 17, 2018, 07:16:04 PM by bluefirecorp_
 #1

Climate change is a concern. A huge concern.

Let's address one of the quarter of the problem; Transportation.

Transportation is one of those industries that we absolutely require, so the anarcho-primitive idea to solving "climate change" is just out there. Without our robust transportation infrastructure, we'd have mass starvation.

I propose we replace our dependence on oil with two new dependencies; water and energy. When you take energy, in the form of electricity, and apply it to water at a specific voltage, you can actually split the oxygen and hydrogen bond, forming some good old Hydrogen and some pure Oxygen.

Production:

https://art.inl.gov/NGNP/NEAC%202010/INL_NGNP%20References/INL-EXT-10-12967%20PCDR.pdf

Electricity and hydrogen from nuclear.



A renewable way to solve this problem would be huge wind farms and solar panels to convert the local water source into hydrogen. However, it'll take a while to build all the turbines and solar that we'd require to replace gasoline with electric. Not to mention, we're already burning coal to produce energy producing items. In reality, this is where we see diminishing returns on hydrogen.

The energy required depends on the state of the water, when it's in a vapor form, it requires less energy to split, because it already has heat energy.

With that in mind, there's another really, obvious solution. Just rig up a fancy steam engines with a nuclear reactor equipped. Not only do nuclear generators already have the requirement of water, it produces massive amounts of energy. Also, it's output is water vapor, exactly what we need to make a lot of hydrogen.

Ideally, we could bootstrap our hydrogen production infrastructure with nuclear very cost effectively (as in $1.80 / GGE (gas gallon equivalent) in 100% clean fuel).


Logistics
That leaves logistics, how do you transport hydrogen?

Well, there's actually several ways. I'm going to leave out the bootstrapping method, mostly because I lost my train of thought.

The idea way would be to use pipeline. I think it'd be a good idea to retrofit our existing pipeline infrastructure and build out where we can. We can use pipelines and work at phasing out natural gas lines (because hydrogen can be burned for heat, just like your natural gas heat).

Quote
Wait a second though; delivering hydrogen directly into people's homes, are you mad bluefirecorp?

Safety is normally highly regulated when it comes to gas lines, I don't see how this would be any different. I think it's safer than many existing pipelines. With your irrational fears annulled, let's continue on.

Vehicles

We already have these. Electric motors are exactly what we need. With a fancy fuel cell stack, hydrogen is converted into electricity. The fuel cell stack does have a byproduct; water vapor. Also, PEM fuel cells aren't perfect, but only because we don't have a perfect catalyst. If our materials scientists and engineers would get off their lazy asses and make a ground breaking breakthrough, we'd see better than our already amazing 50-60% efficiencies with existing materials.

Quote
Wait, losses? There's losses, and we have to carry a generator? What the hell? Why not just battery?
Well, the battery's way more materials costly (even including the fancy hydrogen tank). Also, it's weight is much heavier for less energy, due to batteries very low energy densities. A Honda clarity and Tesla Model S go about the same distance. A clarity has a curb weight of 1,600 kg, a Tesla has a curb weight of between 2000 kg and 2250 kg, depending on how many batteries you add in.

How many losses are generated from having to move that extra 400-600 kg everywhere you go? Not to mention, it's only possible to get only get so many cycles out of the materials heavy battery. With hydrogen tanks, it's feasible to simply reforge them after their service lifetime, given the energy supply.

Boats would utilize the same sort of system, going from diesel generators to hydrogen tanks and PEM fuel cell stacks. However, I have another solution to our boating problem as well.

Now, jets... jets are a different beast. Lockheed CL-400 Suntan exists, where they used liquidized (super-cooled) hydrogen. Program successes included the concept design of a Mach 2.5 aircraft capable of flying at 30,000 meters, and successful conversion of an existing turbojet engine to run on liquid hydrogen, as well as 25+ hours of testing on a customized LH2 engine design. This was back in 1956, if we can't figure out how to retro-fit an airliner with this technology (or compressed hydrogen for that nature), we're doing something wrong as a species.

Missing concepts, filling in the gaps
Please suggest new information here, or ask questions. I'm not really for a social-economic argument. I'd be excited if someone contribute more than "here's how I'd build a commerical airliner powered by hydrogen fuels", but the chances of crypto + hydrogen are slim to none.
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1575675730
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1575675730

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1575675730
Reply with quote  #2

1575675730
Report to moderator
1575675730
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1575675730

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1575675730
Reply with quote  #2

1575675730
Report to moderator
1575675730
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1575675730

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1575675730
Reply with quote  #2

1575675730
Report to moderator
Osamede
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 55
Merit: 1


View Profile WWW
September 24, 2018, 11:46:46 PM
 #2

Looking for alternative energy source that have a zero CO2 emission is a priority, already we have gone beyond the threshold whereby nature cannot effectively convert the emitted CO2 even if we plant trees on the available land space. So in addition to what you outlined, there is need to build artificial CO2 farms, we already have  prototype, such farms does more effectively what plants are supposed to be doing with very small space used. Check out Tedex show on subject https://www.ted.com/talks/jennifer_wilcox_a_new_way_to_remove_co2_from_the_atmosphere?language=en&utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare
It is our collective responsibility to make a better world and will involve multiple changes simultaneously, else we are doomed
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
September 24, 2018, 11:51:23 PM
 #3

Looking for alternative energy source that have a zero CO2 emission is a priority, already we have gone beyond the threshold whereby nature cannot effectively convert the emitted CO2 even if we plant trees on the available land space. So in addition to what you outlined, there is need to build artificial CO2 farms, we already have  prototype, such farms does more effectively what plants are supposed to be doing with very small space used. Check out Tedex show on subject https://www.ted.com/talks/jennifer_wilcox_a_new_way_to_remove_co2_from_the_atmosphere?language=en&utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare
It is our collective responsibility to make a better world and will involve multiple changes simultaneously, else we are doomed


Nope, that's not even remotely what this thread is about. I'm not really interesting in removing carbon from the atmosphere with this. It's about making sure no more carbon is added to the atmosphere and to distribute water vapor everywhere.

However, if you want to talk about ecological solutions to removing CO2, feel free to start your own thread. I'll go ahead and do that for you if you want.
odolvlobo
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 2702
Merit: 1442



View Profile
September 25, 2018, 04:11:09 AM
 #4

It really all depends on the efficiency and effectiveness of storing energy as hydrogen.
orkoso
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 277
Merit: 23


View Profile
September 26, 2018, 02:43:26 PM
 #5

I think this post contains mostly ideas that are imaginative, but terribly inaccurate or simply wrong.

I propose we replace our dependence on oil with two new dependencies; water and energy. When you take energy, in the form of electricity, and apply it to water at a specific voltage, you can actually split the oxygen and hydrogen bond, forming some good old Hydrogen and some pure Oxygen.

Hydrogen nowadays is produced in refineries. The reason is that the dissociation of water in H and O2 is very energy consuming. Its easy to put forward solutions if you don´t have to do numbers.

A renewable way to solve this problem would be huge wind farms and solar panels to convert the local water source into hydrogen. However, it'll take a while to build all the turbines and solar that we'd require to replace gasoline with electric.

Again, the problem is the costs. It does not add-up.


The energy required depends on the state of the water, when it's in a vapor form, it requires less energy to split, because it already has heat energy.
With that in mind, there's another really, obvious solution. Just rig up a fancy steam engines with a nuclear reactor equipped. Not only do nuclear generators already have the requirement of water, it produces massive amounts of energy. Also, it's output is water vapor, exactly what we need to make a lot of hydrogen.

The reason why the nuclear power plants produce vapor is because they put it through a turbine to generate electricity in a quite efficient process. And before you suggest anything "obvious" with that, learn the basics of it.  What you propose would cost x10 times more at least. Also, you will be generating even more radioactive waste that will last for centuries to come.

If that is not enough, simply know that the water used is normally radiated. You don´t want that outside the reactor even if it is the secondary cooling circuit water.

Ideally, we could bootstrap our hydrogen production infrastructure with nuclear very cost effectively (as in $1.80 / GGE (gas gallon equivalent) in 100% clean fuel).

Nope.

Logistics
That leaves logistics, how do you transport hydrogen?
Well, there's actually several ways. I'm going to leave out the bootstrapping method, mostly because I lost my train of thought.
The idea way would be to use pipeline. I think it'd be a good idea to retrofit our existing pipeline infrastructure and build out where we can. We can use pipelines and work at phasing out natural gas lines (because hydrogen can be burned for heat, just like your natural gas heat).
Safety is normally highly regulated when it comes to gas lines, I don't see how this would be any different. I think it's safer than many existing pipelines. With your irrational fears annulled, let's continue on.

Get familiar with the liquefaction of gases and the cost implicated, the design parameters of oleducts and the engineering constrains. In a world without physics laws your idea is great. You are not mad, you simply think that engineering is what you see in the Discovery channel.


Missing concepts, filling in the gaps

I wouldn´t know where to begin honestly.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
September 26, 2018, 05:41:08 PM
 #6

I think this post contains mostly ideas that are imaginative, but terribly inaccurate or simply wrong.


I disagree. I'm pretty sure you're just randomly Google'ing shit.


I propose we replace our dependence on oil with two new dependencies; water and energy. When you take energy, in the form of electricity, and apply it to water at a specific voltage, you can actually split the oxygen and hydrogen bond, forming some good old Hydrogen and some pure Oxygen.

Hydrogen nowadays is produced in refineries. The reason is that the dissociation of water in H and O2 is very energy consuming. Its easy to put forward solutions if you don´t have to do numbers.

Most hydrogen is produced using steam reformation (and gases from fracking). This isn't green or sustainable, which is why I didn't suggest using it as a production method. I have the numbers, because they're all published online. Electrolysis has been studied for over a hundred years.

The energy required depends on the state of the water, when it's in a vapor form, it requires less energy to split, because it already has heat energy.
With that in mind, there's another really, obvious solution. Just rig up a fancy steam engines with a nuclear reactor equipped. Not only do nuclear generators already have the requirement of water, it produces massive amounts of energy. Also, it's output is water vapor, exactly what we need to make a lot of hydrogen.

The reason why the nuclear power plants produce vapor is because they put it through a turbine to generate electricity in a quite efficient process. And before you suggest anything "obvious" with that, learn the basics of it.  What you propose would cost x10 times more at least. Also, you will be generating even more radioactive waste that will last for centuries to come.

If that is not enough, simply know that the water used is normally radiated. You don´t want that outside the reactor even if it is the secondary cooling circuit water.

So, this is where I know you're just Google'ing shit. BWR's second circuit cooling is already released into the atmosphere. We all already know nuclear uses massive cooling towers. So, are you suggesting that's all fake and the nuclear engineers that built the existing systems have no idea what they're talking about? Here's a cool lil' animation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:BWR_nuclear_power_plant_animation.ogv

Logistics
That leaves logistics, how do you transport hydrogen?
Well, there's actually several ways. I'm going to leave out the bootstrapping method, mostly because I lost my train of thought.
The idea way would be to use pipeline. I think it'd be a good idea to retrofit our existing pipeline infrastructure and build out where we can. We can use pipelines and work at phasing out natural gas lines (because hydrogen can be burned for heat, just like your natural gas heat).
Safety is normally highly regulated when it comes to gas lines, I don't see how this would be any different. I think it's safer than many existing pipelines. With your irrational fears annulled, let's continue on.

Get familiar with the liquefaction of gases and the cost implicated, the design parameters of oleducts and the engineering constrains. In a world without physics laws your idea is great. You are not mad, you simply think that engineering is what you see in the Discovery channel.


Missing concepts, filling in the gaps

I wouldn´t know where to begin honestly.


So, I'm pretty familiar with liquification of hydrogen. You need to supercool it and compress it to turn it into a liquid. If you look, I even included a link to a jet that used liquidized hydrogen.

There are a few gaps, such as a better catalyst for the PEM fuel cell stack (currently platinum-carbide is the best iirc). I think tungsten-carbide is another interesting idea, but it comes with its limitations.

So far, none of your points have disproved the hydrogen economy being possible. If you have actual constructive feedback, it'd be nice rather than just being a naysayer spreading FUD.


Edit: So, for some reason, BTCtalk dropped my section where I argued the price. Hydrogen production is under $2.00 per GGE: https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2017/06/f34/fcto-h2-fc-overview-dla-worldwide-energy-conf-2017-satyapal.pdf

Transportation and storage is where the $4 GGE comes in.
orkoso
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 277
Merit: 23


View Profile
September 26, 2018, 09:44:42 PM
 #7

So far, none of your points have disproved the hydrogen economy being possible. If you have actual constructive feedback, it'd be nice rather than just being a naysayer spreading FUD.

This is were I can see that you are a "wannabe" without any scientific nor economic background. When you are proposing a new "solution" YOU have to prove that is feasible. That means that you have to provide at least the basic numbers on which your "theory" (you insult that word) is based. And no, just having a transportation cost is not enough.

Example: "We could put rockets on the moon using butterflies and if you say is not possible you are spreading FUD."  That´s exactly what you are saying.

Bah, this is wasting time. BTW, you will find biased reports to justify anything. That is what lobbies are for.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
September 26, 2018, 09:51:21 PM
 #8

So far, none of your points have disproved the hydrogen economy being possible. If you have actual constructive feedback, it'd be nice rather than just being a naysayer spreading FUD.

This is were I can see that you are a "wannabe" without any scientific nor economic background. When you are proposing a new "solution" YOU have to prove that is feasible. That means that you have to provide at least the basic numbers on which your "theory" (you insult that word) is based. And no, just having a transportation cost is not enough.

Example: "We could put rockets on the moon using butterflies and if you say is not possible you are spreading FUD."  That´s exactly what you are saying.

Bah, this is wasting time. BTW, you will find biased reports to justify anything. That is what lobbies are for.

Umm, I'm from academia, abet a different focus (information technology). I'm not a "wannabe".

I've provided sources and information to support claims which you refuted. Now you're saying "the sources are fake!!!!!". If you're too lazy to double check my work, fuck off?

If you want, I can provide DOI for each bit of research; eg; 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2014.05.078
On the tungsten carbide synthesis for PEM fuel cell application - Problems, challenges and advantages
orkoso
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 277
Merit: 23


View Profile
September 27, 2018, 02:38:21 PM
 #9

So far, none of your points have disproved the hydrogen economy being possible. If you have actual constructive feedback, it'd be nice rather than just being a naysayer spreading FUD.

This is were I can see that you are a "wannabe" without any scientific nor economic background. When you are proposing a new "solution" YOU have to prove that is feasible. That means that you have to provide at least the basic numbers on which your "theory" (you insult that word) is based. And no, just having a transportation cost is not enough.

Example: "We could put rockets on the moon using butterflies and if you say is not possible you are spreading FUD."  That´s exactly what you are saying.

Bah, this is wasting time. BTW, you will find biased reports to justify anything. That is what lobbies are for.

Umm, I'm from academia, abet a different focus (information technology). I'm not a "wannabe".

I've provided sources and information to support claims which you refuted. Now you're saying "the sources are fake!!!!!". If you're too lazy to double check my work, fuck off?

If you want, I can provide DOI for each bit of research; eg; 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2014.05.078
On the tungsten carbide synthesis for PEM fuel cell application - Problems, challenges and advantages


The provable part of "your work" is basically contained here and there is a good rationale behind producing hydrogen in Nuclear Plants, yet in no way by the means suggested.

Even you don't have a background in energies or economics, you do understand that your proposal has to make economic sense. I can't "double check your work" because you have not provided any numbers of your own that I could possibly check. Again, this is so basic that it does not make sense to argue.




bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
October 01, 2018, 12:13:05 AM
 #10

So far, none of your points have disproved the hydrogen economy being possible. If you have actual constructive feedback, it'd be nice rather than just being a naysayer spreading FUD.

This is were I can see that you are a "wannabe" without any scientific nor economic background. When you are proposing a new "solution" YOU have to prove that is feasible. That means that you have to provide at least the basic numbers on which your "theory" (you insult that word) is based. And no, just having a transportation cost is not enough.

Example: "We could put rockets on the moon using butterflies and if you say is not possible you are spreading FUD."  That´s exactly what you are saying.

Bah, this is wasting time. BTW, you will find biased reports to justify anything. That is what lobbies are for.

Umm, I'm from academia, abet a different focus (information technology). I'm not a "wannabe".

I've provided sources and information to support claims which you refuted. Now you're saying "the sources are fake!!!!!". If you're too lazy to double check my work, fuck off?

If you want, I can provide DOI for each bit of research; eg; 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2014.05.078
On the tungsten carbide synthesis for PEM fuel cell application - Problems, challenges and advantages


The provable part of "your work" is basically contained here and there is a good rationale behind producing hydrogen in Nuclear Plants, yet in no way by the means suggested.

Even you don't have a background in energies or economics, you do understand that your proposal has to make economic sense. I can't "double check your work" because you have not provided any numbers of your own that I could possibly check. Again, this is so basic that it does not make sense to argue.






My whole thread is can be summarized by mostly wikipedia.

However, if you want the numbers, here they are. Few years out of date though, so you might need to update the figures and re-run the math yourself.

If you're looking for actual costs, per cent and dollar for stuff, these numbers are probably more helpful.
aplistir
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 362
Merit: 168



View Profile
October 19, 2018, 11:18:16 AM
 #11

The biggest problem is storing hydrogen. IT is difficult to store efficiently.

That is why methane is more interesting. Easier to store, and almost as good as hydrogen as a source of energy. Methane has one carbon and 4 hydrogen atoms. It can be produced using renewable energy.

Some new space rocket engines are being designed to use methane just for that reason. More stable and easier to store in smaller containers. And it burns quite cleanly too. Compared to hydrogen, while burning, it does produce some co², which hydrogen does not , but is does burn cleanly.

Wonder when we will have cars that burn methane?
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
October 19, 2018, 04:52:04 PM
 #12

The biggest problem is storing hydrogen. IT is difficult to store efficiently.

Nah, that's not really the biggest difficulty. The most difficult problem is the chicken-egg scenario; to use hydrogen, you require the infrastructure for hydrogen. To justify the infrastructure, you need items to actually utilize the hydrogen.

People have been long opposed to the infrastructure. Storing the hydrogen's not even that expensive.



Compare those rates to battery and you get a pretty decent deal. Even if you toss in the losses (post storage) of about 50% (to convert to electricity), it's still more cost effective than battery.

Also, that's plenty of power. A $1000-2500 tank that can get you over 400 kilometers in a car is pretty awesome.


Quote
That is why methane is more interesting. Easier to store, and almost as good as hydrogen as a source of energy. Methane has one carbon and 4 hydrogen atoms. It can be produced using renewable energy.
That's a bandied rather than an actual solution. Unless you're also suggesting collection filters for the car, which probably is more expensive.

Quote
Compared to hydrogen, while burning, it does produce some co², which hydrogen does not , but is does burn cleanly.

When we scale up energy demands, any carbon emissions are going to be hard to offset. We need to think about progressing forward rather than regressing to the past.

If you truly think methane is the solution to climate change and a renewable, sustainable future going forward, then feel free to make your own post.
odolvlobo
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 2702
Merit: 1442



View Profile
October 19, 2018, 06:53:58 PM
 #13

...
Vehicles

We already have these. Electric motors are exactly what we need. With a fancy fuel cell stack, hydrogen is converted into electricity. The fuel cell stack does have a byproduct; water vapor.

I think what you are describing is a vehicle like the Chevy Volt, but with the gasoline-powered generator being replaced by hydrogen. It could be an effective solution, though it is not necessarily the best solution.
SaltySpitoon
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 2310
Merit: 1998


Welcome to the SaltySpitoon, how Tough are ya?


View Profile
October 19, 2018, 07:16:18 PM
Merited by Foxpup (4)
 #14

Rather than focusing on hydrogen, I think a more realistic option would be to stop at an intermediary step proposed in your OP.

Production:

A renewable way to solve this problem would be huge wind farms and solar panels to convert the local water source into hydrogen.

We have plenty of methods of storing, utilizing, and transporting electrical energy generated from wind farms or solar panels. By focusing on converting that electrical energy back into a combustible source, we've already lost a fair bit of energy. On top of that, hydrogen is obscenely dangerous. Its molecular structure is so small that it can't reliably be contained in a gaseous phase. I'm not sure if it could be odorized the same way natural gas is, but at this point as far as I know, there is no way to detect gas leaks besides just assuming they are there. Another major issue is that its combustion is a temperature far higher than what modern combustion engines can handle. I use an oxyhydrogen torch that I've gotten pretty close to melting tungsten with at ~6200 degrees Fahrenheit. I know there are catalysts that can lower the temperatures, but that involves another process, another cost, another new piece of machinery to engineer, and another failure point.

My point isn't that it shouldn't be done, I'm sure there are proper ways to handle hydrogen safely, but if the first step is creating it by splitting water, even assuming that we are using Nickel Oxide catalysts rather than platinum to make it economically feasible, it requires that the energy is available in the first place. If we are generating the power needed to create the hydrogen gas in a green fashion, and the only perk to using hydrogen is that we can transport the energy, I'd propose focusing on improving battery technology, or ideally making the switch over to capacitors once we can figure out how to increase their capacities.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
October 19, 2018, 07:50:04 PM
 #15

...
Vehicles

We already have these. Electric motors are exactly what we need. With a fancy fuel cell stack, hydrogen is converted into electricity. The fuel cell stack does have a byproduct; water vapor.

I think what you are describing is a vehicle like the Chevy Volt, but with the gasoline-powered generator being replaced by hydrogen. It could be an effective solution, though it is not necessarily the best solution.

Combustion energy conversion ratios are lower than PEM fuel cell stacks.

Rather than focusing on hydrogen, I think a more realistic option would be to stop at an intermediary step proposed in your OP.
...
If we are generating the power needed to create the hydrogen gas in a green fashion, and the only perk to using hydrogen is that we can transport the energy, I'd propose focusing on improving battery technology, or ideally making the switch over to capacitors once we can figure out how to increase their capacities.

It'd be nice to skip the intermediary step, but we just simply can't for portable energy.

Battery technology has improved a lot over the past couple of decades, but fuel cell systems have become way more cost effective. Storage of hydrogen at high pressures is less resource intensive than holding the same power in lion-ion batteries (even with losses included).

Also, tanks have way more cycles than lion-ion batteries, and the durability of fuel cell stacks are insane.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
November 13, 2018, 08:55:35 PM
 #16

Novel production method of hydrogen; using our wastewater:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenrg.2018.00107/full

Quote
These results are expected to prove the feasibility of stimulating PPB through bio-electrochemical processes in the production of H2 from wastewater resources, which is a field of special novelty and still unexplored.


===

Quote
Yes officer, I run my car off treated poop water.

Ahaha.
jonemil24
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 448
Merit: 58

imagine me


View Profile
November 15, 2018, 03:09:26 AM
Merited by bluefirecorp_ (1)
 #17

According to Enass Abo-Hamed on a LinkedIn video;

"We had the technology that could store hydrogen, but we were not sure what to do with it. Who would be our customers, who would be our users, and who could benefit from a technology like that?"

Read the article.

I would love to see how this hydrogen power would work in the future and I do hope that no one's gonna suppress it. If the day would come that the hydrogen power is widely used, we can now move on discussing if the electric generator of Paramahamsa Tewari really works.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
November 16, 2018, 02:25:14 PM
 #18

According to Enass Abo-Hamed on a LinkedIn video;

"We had the technology that could store hydrogen, but we were not sure what to do with it. Who would be our customers, who would be our users, and who could benefit from a technology like that?"

Read the article.

I would love to see how this hydrogen power would work in the future and I do hope that no one's gonna suppress it. If the day would come that the hydrogen power is widely used, we can now move on discussing if the electric generator of Paramahamsa Tewari really works.

Neat article. I've looked into solid forms of hydrogen storage, but compressed and liquid hydrogen was so much more energy / weight. I did a bit of reading of similar systems, but they required precious resources.

I'll probably dig into this solution a bit more, but I doubt they'll be able to scale manufacturing economically.
bluefirecorp_
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 434
Merit: 126


View Profile
November 17, 2018, 07:15:28 PM
 #19

Since generation has been an argument time and time again;

https://art.inl.gov/NGNP/NEAC%202010/INL_NGNP%20References/INL-EXT-10-12967%20PCDR.pdf
jonemil24
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 448
Merit: 58

imagine me


View Profile
November 22, 2018, 05:25:34 PM
 #20


I'll probably dig into this solution a bit more, but I doubt they'll be able to scale manufacturing economically.

In order for them to distribute it, they will be needing consumers, and for them to massively create a product, they'll be needing investors. So basically, they need consumers to attract those who can give them a capital amount, cough, fund their disruptive technology.

I'm always watching your thread on P.S, reading those intellectual debates between those pro and anti hydrogen, I don't want to join that discussion, but seriously, hydrogen is more safer than gasoline. Hydrogen inhalation therapy shows promise in hospitals across Japan. And they also fear that a leaking hydrogen from a "some sort of tank" is explosive, but debatepedia said;

"...Hydrogen does ignite easily, needing 14 times less energy than natural gas, but that’s of dubious relevance because even natural gas can be ignited by a static-electricity spark.36 Unlike natural gas, however, leaking hydrogen encountering an ignition source is far likelier to burn than to explode, even inside a building, because it burns at concentrations far below its lower explosive limit. Ignition also requires a fourfold higher minimum concentration of hydrogen than of gasoline vapor. In short, in the vast majority of cases, leaking hydrogen, if lit, will burn but not explode. And in the rare cases where it might explode, its theoretical explosive power per unit volume of gas is 22 times weaker than that of gasoline vapor. It is not, as has been claimed, “essentially a liquid or gaseous form of dynamite...” Read the supporting quote or the whole parent debate.

So my dad was surprised, after talking about your other thread on P&S, he just said, "hydrogen powered car was an old technology, dating back in the 1930's, but electric cars are way older. But are you seriously thinking that it can be a disruptive technology with this kind of system we have, water is so abundant you can't even manipulate it, and besides, have you heard of the hindenburg? Roll Eyes"

His inserting his fear with the hindenburg tragedy which I never knew of before. Heck with hindenburg, they even blame the wardenclyffe tower for causing the tragedy.

But what I do love to see how hydrogen can disrupt the energy industry is by replacing nuclear power plants with hydrogen power plants, I hope you didn't get me wrong here, hydrogen powered plants is way different on hydro-electric power made from dams.

There was a new technology that was introduced to replace the idle nuclear power plant country. They were so afraid of the chernobyl power plant incident that's why it's just basically sitting in idle. A private company introduced the hydrogen power plant back in 2002-2003, it was never built because of the fear of hydrogen. But there are some members of my government, after seeing that the danger is not that severe recently(4th Q of 2017), wants it to be built, the only problem is the government can't pull out some of the funds to built it and they need to protect those investors who helped fund the natural gas power plant. To settle the dispute, they have to find investors and let them compete with each other.

So basically, after seeing so much ICOs on this forum, none of them have seen the power of hydrogen power plant as a greener and much more safe than a conventional "ticking bomb" power plant. And the energy distributor in my country implemented prepaid electric system. Do you want hydrogen + electric system + crypto? There you have it, forget about hydrogen flying object, someone might say - "I don't want a burning object flying above my head". The only least thing you will probably think about hydrogen power plant is a mad scientist who wants to detonate it.
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!