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Author Topic: QuadrigaSX Exchange: CEO faked his death to steal 190MioUSD?  (Read 109 times)
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February 02, 2019, 11:57:07 AM
 #1

Another episode of the "The Bitcoin Family" soap:

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/streetwise/article-quadriga-cant-access-190-million-following-ceos-death-court/

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Canadian cryptocurrency exchange Quadriga CX is missing approximately $190-million in funds after the company reported the sudden death of its young founder in December, according to an application for creditor protection filed Thursday.

Quadriga Fintech Solutions Corp., which owns and operates the exchange, is facing a “liquidity crisis” and has only $375,000 in cash while owing the equivalent of more than $260-million to approximately 92,000 users, according to an application for relief under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) filed in the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. Quadriga is seeking to appoint Ernst & Young Inc. as a monitor.

The company has been unable to locate and access about $190-million worth of cryptocurrency, which includes bitcoin and Ethereum, since co-founder and sole director Gerald Cotten, 30, died on Dec. 9. Mr. Cotten was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at age 24 and passed away due to complications from the condition while travelling in India, according to court documents. According to a statement on Quadriga’s website posted more than a month after his death, Mr. Cotten was in the country to open an orphanage.

Quadriga, which launched in 2013, kept the majority of its cryptocurrency in what’s known as “cold wallets,” essentially an offline storage system that protects the funds from hacking and theft. Mr. Cotten had sole responsibility for handling the funds and held the digital security keys to access the wallets, which the company attempted to find after his death. “Quadriga was unable to access the cold wallets and/or discovered that the cold wallets contained minimal cryptocurrency units,” according to a report filed with the court by Ernst & Young.

Mr. Cotten mostly ran the business on his own from his laptop wherever he happened to be, which was typically in a house he shared with his wife in Nova Scotia. Mr. Cotten’s primary laptop is encrypted, according to an affidavit filed by his widow, Jennifer Robertson. “I do not know the password or recovery key,” she said in the affidavit. “Despite repeated and diligent searches, I have not been able to find them written down anywhere.”

She also searched their home and other properties for any company documents, but came up empty. Ms. Robertson hired an outside tech expert to attempt to “hack into Gerry’s computers” in addition to an encrypted USB key. The expert had some luck retrieving a few digital coins and some information from Mr. Cotten’s cellphones and another computer, but the effort has mostly been unsuccessful, the affidavit says.

Ernst & Young argued in its report that creditor protection is necessary to permit an investigation into the missing coins and determine the amounts owing to users, noting that Quadriga’s “accounting systems either do not exist or are not capable of recording and producing even the most basic of accounting summaries.” If approved as a monitor, the company will also determine if a sale of Quadriga is possible.

Operators of other Canadian cryptocurrency exchanges called it highly unusual for a single executive to be the only one with access to the company’s funds. That would have made Mr. Cotten - who was well known in the cryptocurrency community and an avid traveller - vulnerable to being kidnapped or extorted, said Michael Gokturk, CEO of Vancouver-based Einstein Exchange.

“It’s the equivalent of walking around with millions of dollars in cash on you at all times,” Mr. Gokturk said.

Mr. Cotten was diligent in other areas of his life. He signed a will on Nov. 27, less than two weeks before he died. He appointed Ms. Robertson as the executor of his estate and outlined the distribution of his assets, including an airplane, property in British Columbia and Nova Scotia, and two pet chihuahuas named Nitro and Gully, along with $100,000 for their care.

Another portion of Quadriga’s funds is tied up with third-party payment processors. The company had difficulty obtaining accounts with Canadian banks, and last year the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce froze approximately $25.7-million held in an account belonging to one of Quadriga’s payment processors. The funds were eventually paid by CIBC to the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, which transferred the money to the payment processor, Costodian Inc., in the form of bank drafts. Neither Costodian nor Quadriga has been able to find a bank to accept the drafts, however.

Users have been complaining over the course of the past year about difficulties withdrawing money from the exchange. The Globe has spoken to several of these clients, some of whom experienced months of delays trying to withdraw tens of thousands of dollars. None of them wished to be identified due to privacy concerns. The largest individual user account balance is valued at $70-million.

Quadriga continued accepting deposits for weeks after Mr. Cotten’s death. Ms. Robertson, as executor of his estate, filed for an application in B.C. to hold an emergency meeting on Jan. 25 to appoint board directors. Following the meeting, the board decided to take down Quadriga’s trading platform on Jan. 28.

Ms. Robertson’s affidavit notes there has been a significant amount of comment on Reddit and other forums about Quadriga, including speculation about whether Mr. Cotten is actually dead. (The CCAA filings contain a statement of death issued by J.A. Snow Funeral Home in Halifax.) “There have also been threats made against me,” she said. “Slanderous comments have been made against me and sent through Facebook messenger to my entire contact list.” Ms. Robertson is personally funding the costs of the CCAA proceedings, according to her affidavit.

A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Feb. 5.

Exchange operators say Quadriga’s inability to retrieve the funds points to a need for greater regulatory oversight of their industry. Although most exchanges claim to have security protocols in place to protect client funds, such measures are not mandated by any Canadian regulator.

“Exchanges have not really had to report to any regulator on the way in which they run their business,” said Cole Diamond, chief executive of Canadian cryptocurrency company Coinsquare. “That’s why you’re seeing the problem that we’re seeing here today with Quadriga.”


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February 03, 2019, 09:51:04 AM
 #2

https://twitter.com/jespow/status/1091863628066770944

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We have thousands of wallet addresses known to belong to @QuadrigaCoinEx and are investigating the bizarre and, frankly, unbelievable story of the founder's death and lost keys. I'm not normally calling for subpoenas but if @rcmpgrcpolice are looking in to this, contact @krakenfx


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February 03, 2019, 10:35:35 AM
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It is true that it is rather strange that he did not take more care especially if he had health problems. But we often deny fate, even when we are in good health we refuse to accept that something can happen to us overnight. But harassing his wife here and there and really something indecent and supposing the death is fake is horrible for the family, really sad.

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February 03, 2019, 11:42:56 AM
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when i saw alleged cold storage funds moving, i immediately figured it was an exit scam. he could have faked his death, skipped the country with the cold storage, and left his wife holding the bag.

however, from looking at the wallet activity, i don't think those are cold wallet addresses.

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February 03, 2019, 12:28:25 PM
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when i saw alleged cold storage funds moving, i immediately figured it was an exit scam. he could have faked his death, skipped the country with the cold storage, and left his wife holding the bag.

however, from looking at the wallet activity, i don't think those are cold wallet addresses.

Wasn't their Cold Storage secured by Multisigs? Should have been an easy recovery, that way. And it's standard industry procedure to apply those.
Another issue ... are they "real people" ?!

QuadrigaCX was founded (and still controlled?) by two other people:

    Michael Patryn
    Lovie Horner

There have been many rumours about these two people and the consensus is that they are fake names or new legal names that they acquired.

An interesting observation:

    MICHAEL PATRYN is an anagram for PHARMACY INTEL
    LOVIE HORNER is an anagram for HEROIN LOVER

If that's not the biggest fucking coincidence then I don't know what is.

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February 03, 2019, 12:29:46 PM
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It is true that it is rather strange that he did not take more care especially if he had health problems. But we often deny fate, even when we are in good health we refuse to accept that something can happen to us overnight. But harassing his wife here and there and really something indecent and supposing the death is fake is horrible for the family, really sad.

We deny fate .. for sure, if we keep supporting Exit Scamms. That will ruin whole of Bitcoin.

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February 03, 2019, 06:59:09 PM
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It is true that it is rather strange that he did not take more care especially if he had health problems. But we often deny fate, even when we are in good health we refuse to accept that something can happen to us overnight. But harassing his wife here and there and really something indecent and supposing the death is fake is horrible for the family, really sad.

We deny fate .. for sure, if we keep supporting Exit Scamms. That will ruin whole of Bitcoin.

I am not supporting, I just find people are fast to jump on a conclusion. Nothing is sure, people are just speculating here and there (since they can't speculate on QuadrigaSX lol). Let's imagine the guy is really dead, people are making the moment worse for the family.

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February 03, 2019, 08:39:03 PM
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It is true that it is rather strange that he did not take more care especially if he had health problems. But we often deny fate, even when we are in good health we refuse to accept that something can happen to us overnight. But harassing his wife here and there and really something indecent and supposing the death is fake is horrible for the family, really sad.

We deny fate .. for sure, if we keep supporting Exit Scamms. That will ruin whole of Bitcoin.

I am not supporting, I just find people are fast to jump on a conclusion. Nothing is sure, people are just speculating here and there (since they can't speculate on QuadrigaSX lol). Let's imagine the guy is really dead, people are making the moment worse for the family.

if they are exit scamming, then they're preying on your emotions with their sob story and it sounds like you're falling for it. Wink

you have to consider this from the standpoint of the victims. they are being stiffed for $190M because the owner was so fucking careless that the keys have been lost forever? they are going to be an angry mob, looking for answers---and they deserve them.

the story is quite unbelievable IMO. very irrational behavior on the part of the owner......

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February 03, 2019, 08:51:52 PM
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We deny fate .. for sure, if we keep supporting Exit Scamms. That will ruin whole of Bitcoin.

I am not supporting, I just find people are fast to jump on a conclusion. Nothing is sure, people are just speculating here and there (since they can't speculate on QuadrigaSX lol). Let's imagine the guy is really dead, people are making the moment worse for the family.

I'll just leave this here:

Quote
Mr. Cotten was diligent in other areas of his life. He signed a will on Nov. 27, less than two weeks before he died. 

sauce:
https://www.reddit.com/r/QuadrigaCX/comments/amaqyo/we_need_to_sue_geralds_estate_directly/

Lots of fishy things going on here:
  • Owner had sole control of cold storage keys (unheard of these days)
  • Owner executed a will less than two weeks before he died
  • Only evidence of owner's death is a supposed death certificate from India

I would echo this sentiment:

Quote
The fact that he "died" over a month ago, in the midst of a huge legal battle, out of the country, in the 2nd most populated country in the world, in a place that's known for its scammers, bribery, and forging of documents is suspicious enough.

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February 04, 2019, 07:03:02 AM
Merited by squatter (2)
 #10

https://medium.com/@zeroresearchproof/quadrigacx-chain-analysis-report-pt-1-bitcoin-wallets-19d3a375d389

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This report provides an in-depth analysis of QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin holdings.

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February 04, 2019, 07:45:42 AM
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At about $190-million it's an Exit Scamm ON DEFAULT until proven otherwise. There is absolutely no shrugging this off.

Stuff like that kills bitcoin. Everybody inside the scene knows that. No institutional money for you!

All these Cold Store addresses belong onto the table for close survillance. All Deposits on scammer exchanges originating from these adresses will signal what really happened.

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February 04, 2019, 09:58:39 AM
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https://medium.com/@zeroresearchproof/quadrigacx-chain-analysis-report-pt-1-bitcoin-wallets-19d3a375d389

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This report provides an in-depth analysis of QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin holdings.

Thanks for sharing. Pending confirmation from other internet sleuths, this report looks pretty damning for QuadrigaCX, Gerald Cotten and possibly his wife. There is strong circumstantial evidence that they were running a fractional reserve, paying withdrawals with new deposits. That would explain the recent withdrawal delays and the apparently hasty need for Cotten to execute a will and die.

It looks like Quadriga was on the verge of a Gox-style ending:

Quote
Potential Falsehood #2 — QuadrigaCX Has 26,488 Bitcoins in its Possession

Again, via thorough inspection of several dozen verified Bitcoin withdrawals and deposits, the estimated aggregated total number of bitcoins in QuadrigaCX’s possession is south of 1,000 BTC, with 1,000 being a very generous estimate at this point in time.

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February 05, 2019, 08:22:51 AM
Merited by freedomno1 (1), squatter (1)
 #13

Site was deleted. Quote from Google Cache:

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QuadrigaCX Chain Analysis Report (Pt. 1): Bitcoin Wallets
Go to the profile of Zerononcense
Zerononcense
Feb 3

This report provides an in-depth analysis of QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin holdings.

The exposition of this report’s context will be added to the top of this document at a later time in the near future. For the time being, the information provided below will be a collection of all evidence, wallet addresses and other pertinent, relevant facts collected during the investigation of QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin holdings.
Brief Summary of Findings

Below are the findings made by the author of this report:

    It appears that there are no identifiable cold wallet reserves for QuadrigaCX.
    It appears that QuadrigaCX was using deposits from their customers to pay other customers once they requested their withdrawal.
    It does not appear that QuadrigaCX has lost access to their Bitcoin holdings.
    It appears the number of bitcoins in QuadrigaCX’s possession are substantially less than what was reported in Jennifer Robertson’s (wife of allegedly deceased CEO and Owner Gerry Cotten) affidavit, submitted to the Canadian courts on January 31st, 2019.
    At least some of the delays in delivering crypto withdrawals to customers were due to the fact that QuadrigaCX simply did not have the funds on hand at the time. In some cases, QuadrigaCX was forced to wait for enough customer deposits to be made on the exchange before processing crypto withdrawal requests by their customers.
    After completing the analysis, it is the author’s opinion that QuadrigaCX has not been truthful with regards to their inability to access the funds needed to honor customer withdrawal requests. In fact, it is almost impossible to believe that this is the case in lieu of the empirical evidence provided by the blockchain.

Summary of Investigative Methodology

The investigation involved in-depth research into the Bitcoin, and Ethereum wallets of QuadrigaCX. We will begin with Bitcoin.

Most of the transaction information from customers at QuadrigaCX was aggregated from the following Reddit thread (created by the author):

There is a possibility that there may be fraudulent representations of the author of this research in order to obfuscate/skew information and distort the narrative.

To verify and validate the author’s identity — consult these sources: Twitter, Telegram, and Reddit.

Any information or posts that are not reflected through one of these sources should be seen as illegitimate.
Identifying QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin Wallet Addresses

Since the wallet addresses for QuadrigaCX were widely unknown, deposit information from customers was aggregated from the Reddit thread posted above as well as information shared through direct message.

At the onset of this endeavor, only 100% verified transactions with the exchange were consulted in order to ascertain more information about QuadrigaCX’s holdings. These initial addresses were verified using personal identifying information from a few select sources that served as volunteers. The original sources also provided substantial proof that they were indeed customers at QuadrigaCX and had initiated deposits with the exchange. Using this information, the author was then able to ascertain a few known locations that QuadrigaCX had used to either store or send Bitcoin.

Once these initial addresses that QuadrigaCX used were verified, they were then used as a baseline to validate all additional information being submitted by the community at large.

All identities of those that contributed information to this endeavor are omitted from this report with respect to their anonymity.

In the process of aggregating information, the following Bitcoin wallet addresses are a small sample of all those that were confirmed to belong to QuadrigaCX:

    36aenge8ZXwjRxHvtbt3HkvJRzxPNnMfeY
    3Hz4NRi2fMZkUrfJXUbYygi5zoo86QXGg6
    3FtVrDgvnhfAiGNHKazmjNwC7kBbT9fktX
    3L4QYoGJfocATAHQz5SXB+FHWbNbMhQjEdA
    358ugsYE2hKDr8Bcyob5TUXgc5n5FHxtjj
    3HVkrkZj7YNscV6KrtaSpWPSGVqVum6RAR
    3FYCpaMxvZ5dX8VCyUwcTkuCvteAUgys3c
    3Bei6hrKrsbE2NTg9gNXwRP6EVPmYcZ7Zx
    3LZfJoPiZGUt5cDAsFwibVFLyjMbq1H2Us
    33x4GqFGJi4fu3WEKNk7qQ6bF3uzyATqS8
    39b59sQb4azPuUdoEXtUL7K2QQLQzC9knT
    3Q8KJEBP58wVK4RDgeuPAKgi5vZQHcUAYu
    3HyNBSg8HjbxUuycfiJ8cU4dfNTYeSrGpA
    3J1ywusNW48i9qAWGeXwh4CURii7ieoZUv
    3NAWo2VV2XSmxckfG8xinrtJ46queEp1w7
    35gtPDp3nvACjLPFg2PC1mXsgfaoYYjFSX
    35r88wsFESp4CXmwKRnXPykTARwWnVH1sq
    3JEasHVpmkn9Vivf1KEhJEXJjrGF1KejpJ
    3MNaurs8trMJmJwZewSB1gY7dmDgCziris
    335hbW2xXygr7rrmoddchYjchzykiYtELw
    3LGgMA2uw6VWyCQ8U2dM6GAaNAKzRr9Wrr
    34hoZWYmv4WnoUDzV4BQvvFAcwUbL54G5X
    36qBVXUpZB8ByHo1cqEyTSRa9V3bSrLdXa
    3PssBQxdXoq2HLrD8W56QZNi7eH2vko4mB
    3KYEyqY2av6PzbAKwJvLsT4wKRPrnsV8Mu
    35pnEcngU5SnRViZNHiAFRqUuXAWJtVBhD
    3FWxEN9ebgnbCvZqLK6mbmZ5f8PAtT4nEJ
    35k2kwnn1Uhk55ZCVUzRpWKrdGeNobYsHm
    3MVfvS31Si4oiK8sTn5TuHt59bQyZUoebM
    34jprabSiFXPiFuDBmzzVwf2B19MiUU6Ld
    3L5t5tzjsgqRbdWVdgBNTQJM48LhhSMf7o

These above addresses (among several others) were saved into an excel spreadsheet. The Google Drive link to this spreadsheet will be spread in the very near future (see note at the bottom of this piece about expediting the release of information for the benefit of customers at QuadrigaCX).
‘WalletExplorer’ (the site) Served as This Report’s Research Basis

The benefit of WalletExplorer is that the original creators were knowledgeable about the Hierchical Deterministic (HD) wallet structure of many of the most popular wallet providers for the Bitcoin protocol.

In fact, WalletExplorer was created and is still ran by Chainalysis. It does not contain the exact same suite of tools, unfortunately, but the same analysis can be performed — it just requires a bit more manual labor.
What are HD Wallets?

HD wallets are built by wallet providers and they come with the added feature of producing/creating millions of different wallet addresses. The purpose of these wallets is to help enhance user security by providing a different, unique wallet address for each transaction that the user makes.
Source: https://coinsutra.com/hd-wallets-deterministic-wallet/

Given the fact that it is more than likely true that QuadrigaCX used such wallets for the management of client funds on their exchange, tracking each wallet on a one-by-one basis would be a futile and infeasible effort.

However, the website, walletexplorer.com, is able to prevent this time expenditure.
How So?

Walletexplorer.com is able to associate wallet addresses with related transactions via a process called ‘address clustering’.

For more information about how address clustering, the following source should prove sufficient:
QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin Wallet (Clustered Address)

QuadrigaCX’s main ‘hot’ clustered wallet address was determined to be:
Wallet 000009200775868e [WalletExplorer.com]

Want to trace bitcoins with even better tool? Check Chainalysis.com. It has even better detection of wallets, more…
www.walletexplorer.com

This finding was further reinforced and validated by using the transaction information from dozens of customers that had provided over 100 Bitcoin transaction IDs, deposit and withdrawal wallet addresses altogether.

Each one of the wallets listed above were either directly sent to the cluster address or had at least part of the deposited funds sent to the cluster address at some point in time.
Revelations From Analyzing Customer Deposit Information

    None of the withdrawal addresses provided by customers led to a wallet that could be considered anything comparable to a ‘reserve’ wallet.
    The beginning number of the wallet addresses (‘3’) denotes that the wallets used by QuadrigaCX all had multi-signature capability. Whether this security feature was deployed or not, however, is unknown.
    After analyzing the cluster address, there is no indication that QuadrigaCX ever held a substantial amount of capital (>100 $BTC) in their possession.

The key takeaway from the deposit information provided by customers is that QuadrigaCX more than likely never held enough $BTC to account for the customer funds. In the next section, the customer withdrawal information related to $BTC transactions on the exchange reflect that QuadrigaCX was clearly re-routing payments from customers to satisfy withdrawal requests from other customers on their exchange, effectively operating a shell exchange or a ponzi.

Again, more screenshots and walkthroughs of the actual addresses will be provided shortly. For time’s sake and in hopes of providing strong leads for the rest of the community, the aggregated deposit address information from QuadrigaCX customers as well as the discovered ‘hot’ cluster wallet address for QuadrigaCX has been listed so that readers may independently verify this information in the meantime.
Customer Withdrawals from QuadrigaCX

After verifying the cluster address, an attempt was made to locate the existence of a potential cold wallet address.

In order to do so, the author of this study also extracted significant information from customers regarding their withdrawals at QuadrigaCX.

In specific, this section will analyze that withdrawal information and examine conclusions (if any) can be made from it.

Let’s start with a batch of withdrawal transaction ID’s submitted by QuadrigaCX customers. Again, this information was verified independently via chain analysis by checking time stamps, reported amounts, and the flow of transactions from and to known wallet addresses on the Bitcoin protocol, specifically those positively identified as belonging to QuadrigaCX.
List of Withdrawal Transaction IDs (Sample of Verified Transactions; Not the Entire List of Transactions Received and Cross Referenced)

    2e31256d6e5c6b549f4a1a3640e591fd07782115cd5d7037689a24c2cfba4812
    ce754512ae789f630399524477e7cfab8059dcb81130fd9d95fee898118d9d4a
    20c3a34539964e5e13116ec48520f7835ca7c49fe1693f1c2e17abcf96a54f35
    43764980ce045528e4c3297b737c97368925ecb67efda7514a09362899bdec68
    fed9ab175eefe90aa3635c8986c45f50063459050c003c34061d98312ac6feb3
    d3b8c635bd070211df6d9129af5aeb6cc2b46220b68c27b362aae84d8df6130d
    18504732321d6478acd3c91f01096eac6bd327528ab54f4fca6ed162fa7e22e9
    cbe6ab34a527b8a90a227f2ccab84e98c6ed1438f8c5e02db069c8ff0dc66d13
    88f92e37b564c6f7a172b87cb5e5c377334a189722886d0f4a5fb24782af59fd
    6bf41d5ebbc927ded85d202ddd0d1bd837e944868eee8c24e5a10c0d8e3858c2

The above ten transaction IDs were selected from a host of several dozen verified transaction IDs sent by former clients at QuadrigaCX’s exchange and they have been verified independently as well.
Analyzing the Withdrawal Transaction IDs (Bitcoin)

To get a better idea of the methodology that QuadrigaCX employed to send customers requested withdrawal amount of bitcoins, we’ll look at the first transaction ID provided above (2e31256d6e5c6b549f4a1a3640e591fd07782115cd5d7037689a24c2cfba4812)

If we visit https://walletexplorer.com and input this transaction ID, we should see the following screen:
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/72714eea7af9c022

The customer requesting a withdrawal requested the .32737521 $BTC amount in the transaction above.

This is annotated in the screenshot below for convenience:

What is particularly noteworthy in the screenshot above is that the funds were sent from a cluster address that was created no more than 4 hours beforehand.

The first amount shown in the transaction log of this cluster address [72714eea7af9c022] is negligible (0.00679 $BTC). However, the second (1.20771943 $BTC) was not.

Therefore, that cluster wallet was pursued.

The following chain of links were followed:

    https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/05e981e66fadc1f0 ; This was yet another cluster address with a relatively small number of bitcoins (1.20811207 $BTC) in it before they were all sent. The last in-flow of currency into the wallet was made on September 28th, 2018.
    https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/f69188b0061ce118 ; This cluster address contained only 0.37663 $BTC in it, which was transacted into the cluster address on February 23rd, 2018.
    https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/1e0b3ff0013f2b2b ; This link was derived by following the only incoming transaction into the cluster address found in #2.

#3 was most interesting, because it does not appear to be a personal wallet from a customer. . This is indicated by the numerous cluster wallets that have been positively identified as belong to other exchanges via research and verified wallet identifications.
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/1e0b3ff0013f2b2b

Further analysis of the cluster wallet addresses show that it was receiving money from personal wallet addresses belonging to clients or from client accounts on different exchanges. This conclusion was made by analyzing the cluster addresses that had sent funds to the cluster address depicted above. The pattern of transactions in those wallets largely matched those of confirmed customer wallet addresses.

The above analysis led to the conclusion that the overarching cluster wallet that granted the customer their withdrawal request (72714eea7af9c022) was only able to do so after aggregating funds from other customers that had deposited on to the exchange.

More specifically, it appears that the exchange had attempted to create individual cluster wallets for customers at one point in time, yet found itself in a situation (more toward the end of 2018), where customer funds that had originally been apportioned for others were eventually redirected to compensate new customers requesting their withdrawals.

This is evidenced by the fact that the specific TX that was analyzed in this case (2e31256d6e5c6b549f4a1a3640e591fd07782115cd5d7037689a24c2cfba4812) that serves as the base point for examining how a customer received their funds from the QuadrigaCX exchange reflects the following:

    QuadrigaCX did not have a designated hot or cold wallet to send the customer their funds. In specific, they were forced to aggregate funds from disparate, disorganized locations in order to ensure that the withdrawal was successful.
    Since the funds came from various, unrelated customer deposits located in disparate cluster wallet addresses, it is more than likely that bitcoins which were originally apportioned for specific customers had to be redirected in order to satisfy customer withdrawals.

It is worth noting that there is no guarantee that the above analysis represents a factual truth for QuadrigaCX. However, when comparing their withdrawal practices to that of other known solvent exchanges (Coinbase, Bittrex, Bitstamp, Binance, etc.), the movement of bitcoins to satisfy customer demand is highly unorthodox and extremely inefficient for any legitimate exchange.

It is also worth noting that this withdrawal transaction occurred in November 2018, which is within a period of time when the exchange’s financial and functional troubles were at their height.
Customer Complaints Corroborate This Theory

While there are a number of customer complaints with regards to the exchange’s failure to complete fiat withdrawal requests, further research into the exchange’s numerous crypto withdrawal delays seems to corroborate the theory posited above.

The following Reddit posts serves as cogent examples:

The last Reddit thread shown above, specifically, shows responses from several customers that were forced to wait a significant amount of time before receiving their bitcoins (up to a day at times).
The Death of Gerry Cotten (CEO and Owner of QuadrigaCX) Has Not Prevented the Exchange from Accessing its Bitcoin Reserves

After QuadrigaCX shuttered the metaphorical doors on its website on January 28th, 2019, it posted a statement (which is still on the website currently) approximately three days later that stated that the team was looking for its ‘reserve keys’, and that its failure to find said keys has resulted in their inability to fulfill customer crypto withdrawal requests.

Read below:
Source: https://www.quadrigacx.com

The statement above does not attribute the failure to locate the alleged existence of QuadrigaCX’s reserve wallets to Gerry Cotten’s passing, but this is stated in an affidavit from Gerry Cotten’s widow, Jennifer Robertson, later the same day.
Why This Claim Should be Met With Intense Scrutiny

As stated toward the beginning of this analysis, a definitive ID of QuadrigaCX’s main cluster wallet address has already been made via chain analysis and further confirmed through the analysis of hundreds of transactions going to and from the exchange to its customers:
Wallet 000009200775868e [WalletExplorer.com]

Want to trace bitcoins with even better tool? Check Chainalysis.com. It has even better detection of wallets, more…
www.walletexplorer.com

Again, for posterity purposes, below is the link to Bitfury’s research explaining how Hierchical Deterministic (HD) wallets work on the Bitcoin protocol and what features of Bitcoin transactions and wallet addresses make address clustering an extremely reliable method of aggregating addresses belonging to one entity.

Given the above information, it is worth noting that there are several outgoing transactions that have been made since the alleged date of Gerald Cotten’s passing (December 9th, 2018).

Below are numerous examples:
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/000009200775868e?page=2
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/000009200775868e?page=3
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/000009200775868e?page=3
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/000009200775868e?page=3

As one can see in the screenshots above, QuadrigaCX transferred approximately 3.53 $BTC from its platform (approximately $12,381 USD worth) from the evening of January 24th through the 25th.

This movement strongly contradicts the idea that there are no funds that QuadrigaCX has access to.

Of course, the natural counter to this argument would be that the cluster address does not contain the hot wallet.

However, it is worth noting that this cluster address contains over 200,000 wallet addresses that have been used by QuadrigaCX:
https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/000009200775868e/addresses
Mt. Gox Connections and Shifty Bitcoin Movements

One cluster address that deserves a significant amount of scrutiny can be found here:
Wallet 006daa655b240256 [WalletExplorer.com]

Want to trace bitcoins with even better tool? Check Chainalysis.com. It has even better detection of wallets, more…
www.walletexplorer.com

It is unknown what the purpose of this wallet is, but it has received significant deposit amounts from QuadrigaCX’s main hot wallet cluster address.

From November 8th to December 8th, this wallet received 760 bitcoins from the QuadrigaCX main wallet address. It is unknown what happened to these bitcoins or why they were moved, but they are no longer in the cluster wallet address.

The cluster wallet was created on May 25th, 2018 and since its inception, QuadrigaCX has sent 3,363 bitcoins to this location.

When calculating the USD value of these transfers (using the estimated value of transaction by multiplying by Bitcoin’s strike price at the time of transacting), it appears QuadrigaCX sent approximately $12.7 million worth of bitcoins to this address over the last 7 months.
Mt. Gox Transfers

If one examines the link provided above underneath the subheading for this section, it is more than likely that the following will be noticeably apparent:

In total, 2,241 bitcoins have come from this cluster address. It is unknown whether the specific wallets that have sent Bitcoin funds into the address have a direct relationship with Mt. Gox, however, this seems to be yet another observation worth noting as well.
QuadrigaCX Has Stated Multiple Times That it Possesses Cold Wallets

One of the more prevalent claims made by QuadrigaCX through their website, interviews/articles, social media, and court filings is that there exists a vast ‘cold’ reserve where a significant number of bitcoins are stored (as well as cold wallets for Ethereum, Litecoin, and the other crypto assets sold on their exchange).
QuadrigaCX Claims on its Website that Cold/Reserve Wallets Do Exist

On their support page, which is still up for the time being, QuadrigaCX posted a message on January 9th, 2018, explaining why there may be delays in receiving Bitcoin transactions.

The message is posted below:

Link to the Support Article: https://support.quadrigacx.com/support/solutions/articles/9000139532-where-is-my-bitcoin-withdrawal-

Archived Link (in case of deletion/removal): http://archive.is/TKwBu

In specific, the statement, “If you have successfully entered your Transaction PIN and Email Confirmation Code to confirm the Bitcoin (XBT) withdrawal from your account, then it will be sent within 10 minutes unless for some reason the hot wallet balance is low and needs to be topped up” implicitly suggests that there is a cold wallet reserve or a more extensive funding source that the exchange would pull from in the instance that its ‘hot wallet’ was bereft of funds.
Gerry Cotten (former CEO & Owner of QuadrigaCX) States on Record That QuadrigaCX Utilized Cold Wallet Reserves

In a now widely shared CoinDesk article, Gerry Cotten, the exchange’s former CEO and Owner that allegedly passed away in India nearly two months ago, stated in an interview with the publication that the exchange engaged in “extensive security measures”.

The excerpt from this CoinDesk article is posted below:
Source: https://www.coindesk.com/canada-bitcoin-exchange-leader-market-turmoil

As highlighted above, the key sentence to focus on in the CoinDesk article is the one where it states, “Cotten, in turn, spoke to Quadriga’s security strengths, noting that the exchange uses multi-signature cold storage to secure bitcoin holdings.”

In specific, many have focused on the ‘multi-signature’ part of the phrase in recent days to make the argument that speculation about Gerry Cotten’s death is a moot point because the multi-signature nature of the wallets would enable QuadrigaCX to still access their funds.

The speculation about why QuadrigaCX may or may not be able to access their crypto funds began because QuadrigaCX has claimed in recent days that they are unable to honor customer withdrawal requests due to the fact that they no longer have access to their reserve wallets.

As a side point, it is worth noting that the highlighted statement in the CoinDesk article only contained a claim made by Gerry Cotten that there was a Bitcoin cold/reserve-wallet, rather than a cold/reserve wallet for all cryptocurrencies offered to traders on QuadrigaCX.
QuadrigaCX’s Recent Court Filings Speculate About the Existence of Cold/Reserve Wallets as Well

Specifically, information about the alleged cold reserves of QuadrigaCX can be found in Jennifer Robertson’s (wife of reportedly deceased CEO, Gerald Cotten) sworn affidavit, which was submitted to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia (Canada) on January 31st, 2019 in furtherance of QuadrigaCX’s petition for Creditor Protection from the courts.

The full affidavit has been posted on Scribd, and can be accessed below:
Source: https://www.scribd.com/document/398721572/Jennifer-Robertson-Affidavit#from_embed?campaign=SkimbitLtd&ad_group=100652X1574425X640a8d8f2590c81acce9575c8078b8fc&keyword=660149026&source=hp_affiliate&medium=affiliate

Specifically, the following statements (located on page 5 of the affidavit), are of relevance to this section:

    “Any coins credited to a user on the platform were stored by Quadriga, either in a hot wallet or a cold wallet. Coins withdrawn by a user would be stored in a wallet controlled by that user.”
    “Quadriga keeps only a minimal amount of coins on the server (in a hot wallet). The normal procedure was that Gerry would move the majority of the coins to cold storage as a way to protect the coins from hacking or other virtual theft.”
    “The amount of coin kept on the server versus in cold storage was originally set at a fixed amount. Transfers could happen automatically or manually. The threshold requirement for Quadriga’s hot wallet was removed some time ago and, after that, Gerry manually controlled the flow of coins between the hot and cold wallets of the coins credited on the Quadriga platform.”
    “Transfers from the cold wallet to the hot wallet would occur when the hot wallet was running low and withdrawals were being sent to users. The transfer of coins from the cold wallet to the hot wallet was performed manually by Gerry.”
    “There is no defined standard in the cryptocurrency industry for how coins are stored, but the normal practice for any exchange or person dealing in cryptocurrency is to keep the coins in a cold wallet for security purposes.”
    “The database would keep track of useres, and there are currently approximately 363,000 registered users in the Quadriga database. As at the date of filing this affidavit, approximately 115,000 users (the “Affected Users”) of the Quadriga website held balances in their personal accounts, representing obligations payable by Quadriga to the Affected users in the form of: (i) cash obligations; or (ii) obligations to hold cryptocurrency units on their behalf. Quadriga currently owes its Affected Users $70 million, plus cryptocurrency, cumulatively valued (based on cryptocurrency market pricing as of December 17, 2018) at approximately $180 million. Total obligations due to the Affected Users approximate $250 million as of December 17, 2018.”
    “As of January 18, 2019, the following cryptocurrency balances were recorded — Bitcoin: 26,488.59834, Bitcoin Cash: 11,378.79082, Bitcoin Cash SV: 11,149.74262, Bitcoin Gold: 35,230.42779, Litecoin: 199,888.408, and Ethereum: 429,966.0131”

Statements By QuadrigaCX That Have Been Shown to be False (Currently) Through Chain Analysis

In order to protect the author of this study (legally) from any potential legal ramifications, it must be stated that the following statements are not being asserted as empirical truths, but rather observations from the author based on the analysis that they have conducted independently. These statements are not intended as libel, but rather to serve as an accurate representation of fact, to the author’s knowledge, at this point in time.
Potential Falsehood #1 — There is a cold wallet(s) for QuadrigaCX’s Bitcoin Holdings

Based on the analysis of dozens of aggregated wallet addresses and transaction IDs for bitcoin withdrawals and deposits on the exchange, there is no evidence that a cold wallet for QuadrigaCX is currently in existence.

No withdrawal transaction has been sourced to a significant pool of bitcoins (i.e., cluster address) that were not positively identified (objectively) as belonging to another exchange.

In addition, thorough analysis of QuadrigaCX’s main hot wallet cluster address has failed to provide evidence that there has been any movement of bitcoins to an outside wallet address (or cluster address) that contains any significant holding of bitcoins.
Potential Falsehood #2 — QuadrigaCX Has 26,488 Bitcoins in its Possession

Again, via thorough inspection of several dozen verified Bitcoin withdrawals and deposits, the estimated aggregated total number of bitcoins in QuadrigaCX’s possession is south of 1,000 $BTC, with 1,000 being a very generous estimate at this point in time.

Chain analysis shows that the vast majority of holdings in the wallets and addresses that QuadrigaCX owns have already been liquidated or moved to an exchange.
Conclusion

Due to the time sensitive nature of this issue (QuadrigaCX plans on appearing in court Feb. 5th to submit their appeal for creditor protection), this report is being published slightly premature.

There is a lot of additional information from the analysis that the author will include throughout the day (February 3rd, 2019), and in the next few days.

All edits will be annotated at the bottom of the article and announced via all social media platforms owned by the report’s author.

Please feel free to reach out on any of those platforms if you have any additional information or questions about the report. Crowdsourcing reliable information and attempting to make the findings contained within as solid as possible is in the interest of the greater crypto community.

If you’re interested in donating/contributing to the author (this was all done pro bono), feel free to submit a $BTC tip here:

1BxwKqfKFQhq2pyvbbcxfagN2bTK3cBqBs

    BitcoinCryptoCryptocurrencyExchangesHacks

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Zerononcense

Twitter = ProofofResearch ; Telegram = @MerkleTrader ; Reddit = u/Randomshortdude | Delivering Information About Crypto

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Bitcoin is not a bubble, it's the pin!
+++ GPG Public key FFBD756C24B54962E6A772EA1C680D74DB714D40 +++ http://pgp.mit.edu/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x1C680D74DB714D40
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