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Author Topic: Facebook's privacy invasion is INSANE  (Read 608 times)
creeps
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March 27, 2019, 02:45:31 AM
 #21

That's our technology nowadays, and its getting more advance. Its too late now for me to be more secured since I've already using Facebook ever since but I'm still trying to keep it on private no matter what happen. I tried to be inactive and I don't post any photos there ever since I've enter in this market. Its pretty amazing how they can easily detect the person on that photos and yet the security of their system is still questionable until now.

I've also activated their function where you can disable your friends from tagging you, I think this can also help for your security so no one can post on your timeline without your permission.
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March 28, 2019, 09:03:53 PM
 #22

I see many parents posting pictures of their newborns on facebook and children in general. Opening the door and inviting trouble into your home. The least we can do is protect our children until they are old enough to make their own decisions. They don't understand for what sick purposes their pictures can be used, any I am not talking about targeted advertising. Our children should be kept away from social media for as long as possible.
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March 31, 2019, 03:27:37 PM
 #23

Well, you ain't seen nothing yet. Pretty sure it is going to get even worst: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odkgmdDqqF8  Huh
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April 05, 2019, 10:56:49 PM
 #24

So last week , i attended my friend's wedding , one of his relatives took a photo for us , it was me, the groom , and another 2 guys that i don't know " his colleagues"

The next day, i woke up to this notification from FB.




i click it, and i get this





Right above the my photo  Huh Huh


I don't have the guy who posted the photo on my FB , he did not tag me , he simply posted on his wall and FB knows where and how i spent my night while i was signed out and totally offline.

also, while i do post a few photos of my ugly face once in a while, non of my photos have any similarities with the color of the picture, and my the picture was a bit dark, not zoomed it to my face.

 i have installed and worked with quite a few high quality face recognition cameras and non of them would catch a similar scenario so I gotta give credit for such INSANE technology.


TL;DR , if you have ever posted your photo on FB then regardless of what you do, they will always know your whereabouts  Grin
Whoa dude.. That's really spooky! How could they? What's the method used? There must be an explanation to how they knew these things about you 🤔
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April 09, 2019, 11:50:47 PM
 #25

Simple click the button "ignore or not me" and that's the end of the story.

That's not the end of the story, unless that bit of information is going to be deleted from their database (probably never going to happen).

if you don't care much about your privacy then that may not seem like a problem, but for someone who does , it's really a concerning issue.

I personally want to you use Facebook to run my business, chat with friends and family who are overseas, see some memes here and there,I do not even bother with my pictures being seen on Facebook, but i surely have a problem with them knowing my exact location when i have not permitted it.
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April 10, 2019, 02:12:49 AM
Merited by The Pharmacist (2)
 #26

In the next few days, his wife (also present) during our conversation and myself started seeing sponsored ads on facebook and google about watches, Citizen watches, best local shops to buy a watch etc... The weird thing is that he didn't receive any ads, only his wife and myself.  

Now how is that for a scary bed time story?!

Happened to me with programing. I'm not a programmer, not interested on it, and I understand zero about it, but I was talking with a friend of mine (he is a programmer) about programming Ruby and Python, on Discord. He was explaining me what he was doing in his job, just a friend talking about "what are you doing now, man"
2 days later, the ads on my Facebook (luckily, not Google) were "do you want to learn programming? Course of blahblah Python" .

The worst part of all is, I don't even spoke in english when I was talking with my friend.
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April 11, 2019, 07:57:10 PM
 #27

The main reason why I think facebook introduced this feature is to reduce the number of scammers impersonating people.
I've heard of internet fraudsters downloading and using people's pictures to scam people. This kinda feature will alert the real owner of the picture once his/her photo is uploaded on facebook.
To enable/disable this feature using facebook app, go to settings>face recognition
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May 01, 2019, 08:15:02 PM
 #28

Probably that's one of the negative effects of the latest technology. We can't even find enough privacy because most of our personal information even our appearance could be tracked by apps like Facebook. However, we could do something to get rid of it. There are privacy settings that we just have to check.
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May 02, 2019, 09:48:39 AM
 #29

Enough of the problems, here's a solution:


Run your own server

  • social networks
  • email
  • online shopping (i.e. open bazaar)
  • file repo (be your own dropbox)
  • ...and of course, Bitcoin


It's not the easiest thing ever, but you only have to learn it once.

Then you can have all that internet-y stuff, and the facebook zombies will slowly begin to realise that they're the new sub-class of human Cheesy (instead of facebook zombies thinking you're a weirdo)
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May 24, 2019, 11:54:19 PM
 #30

I think Facebook has been thinking about the security of the privacy of the account that we have even though we actually feel spied on by Facebook, but we also have to remain vigilant by not posting things that are very private
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June 04, 2019, 09:03:08 PM
 #31

A bit off topic, but facial recognition isn't the worst privacy invasion out there.

https://slashdot.org/index2.pl?fhfilter=gait

The scary part is, like the plagibot working on this forum, the Chinese can now go back to all previous bank robberies, protests, etc and identify you as a criminal years after the fact, before you paid attention to how you walk, or put a rock in your shoe.  :/
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June 22, 2019, 03:39:43 PM
Merited by Welsh (6), vapourminer (2)
 #32

Probably that's one of the negative effects of the latest technology. We can't even find enough privacy because most of our personal information even our appearance could be tracked by apps like Facebook. However, we could do something to get rid of it. There are privacy settings that we just have to check.

I think the privacy settings are just to give the illusion that they are not tracking you. There is huge money in personal data, and what is now being called surveillance capitalism. Tracking through FB posts is only the tip of the iceberg. Anyone who carries a modern mobile phone is giving their location to these companies 24 hours a day, and there is nothing you can do to stop it. All browsing history is tracked. A major aim with FB's new Libra coin is I'm sure to suck up data on purchase history, too.

So they get all this data, which they sell on to third parties, advertisers and spam mailers, for profit. But it's more far-reaching than that, they use all this data to build up a profile of your personality, your interests, your web of personal relationships, your preferences and biases... the aim being an ever more accurate digital representation of you, in order to better predict your future behaviour. FB and Google seem to be the worst two offenders, but it is spreading. Advertisers pay a lot of money for this information.

It doesn't stop there, either. FB is particularly egregious in regard to using this information to modify your behaviour, most notably in curated newsfeeds to channel you into voting for a certain party. Google do this as well - take Pokemon Go, by "Niantic", which was spun out of Google - a restaurant only needs to pay a few dollars to lure a rare Pokemon to their establishment and they will increase foot traffic and sales dramatically. So this thing is dressed as a game, but is quite clearly a means to modify consumer behaviour.

I'm in the EU, and thanks to GDPR legislation, we now have a better idea of what is happening, even if we can't stop it. Every website now gives you a cookie warning, and if you delve into the permissions you're presented with an endless labyrinth of client companies who then sell the data to their clients, etc, etc. But people just click 'ok' to accept everything. Even I do it sometimes, it's everywhere, it wears you down. You can use VPNs and ad-blockers and everything else, but the attack is just relentless and omnipresent.

There's a ton of information out there once you start looking. Take this article from 5 years ago - imagine how much the tech has improved since then!
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jun/29/facebook-users-emotions-news-feeds

Sorry, I'll stop ranting now. Don't trust privacy settings!
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June 22, 2019, 03:55:35 PM
 #33



They have been spying  from the start and I believe they don't just have that technology. Probably even can hear and can see thru  the use of our phones. I once discussed my plan of buying a new car and my brother and I compare brands and prices on the dinner table. Few hours later I tried going into my facebook account and some of the feeds are car sales and new models  of toyota.
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June 22, 2019, 04:53:15 PM
Merited by vapourminer (1)
 #34

Amazon are kind of bad for this as well.
"Alexa, please listen to everything I say and then feed me crappy adverts based on my private offline conversations."

Honestly, it's everywhere.

The reason they get away with it is because it's virgin territory. They say move fast and break things - they just have to move ahead of the governments into un-legislated space. Google Maps basically photographs everything on the planet. Fine, no law to stop it. Facebook bases adverts on what they think you are thinking.  Fine, no law to stop it.

Remember the old TV footage of US astronauts planting a flag on the moon? Because they could. No Russian cosmonauts there to stop them. Same thing now with these tech companies.
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June 23, 2019, 06:36:30 AM
 #35

I don't use Facebook or Twitter, and I only use Ebay as a guest. Amazon gave me a free prime account, and I do use that sometimes. This does give me a few problems in on-line trading, and I'm a bit cautious about using many of the escrow services. Sometimes I think it is better to rely on a personal evaluation of a buyer. I need to becoming more active in my domain name business, and I'm starting to offer a 10% discount for payment with Bitcoin. As a result of this, I'm considering using my trust and reputation ratings with Bitcoin Talk to instil confidence in buyers. I don't know what my account(s) are worth, but it is probably more than many of the names I'm offering for sale.

So what do you guys think? Could Bitcoin Talk be better than Facebook to check Bitcoiners reputations?
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June 24, 2019, 11:36:27 PM
 #36

It is most definitely going to get worse especially with Calibra wallet set into place. Imagine all the data they can extract from our spending history
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June 24, 2019, 11:44:41 PM
 #37

That's effing scary--and I remember how crazy Shazam was when it came out.  I was absolutely blown away by the technology, but this is frightening.

I deleted my FB account back in 2010 and never looked back, but doubtless that doesn't mean anything as far as them still having all the pics I uploaded.  Ugh. 

Same here. Not an FB user anymore for so long already. But for some, it is a means of displaying their whereabouts. Where is the privacy and security that fb is boasting to its consumers? It seems that if you are an ardent fb user and posting your pics all the time, your privacy is already gone.
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June 25, 2019, 06:51:45 AM
 #38

Same here. Not an FB user anymore for so long already.

good job Smiley


But for some, it is a means of displaying their whereabouts. Where is the privacy and security that fb is boasting to its consumers? It seems that if you are an ardent fb user and posting your pics all the time, your privacy is already gone.

this is where Faceborg can't win: practicality. You can get someone a Bitcoin wallet (that respects your privacy) with a couple taps and a 5 minute wait while it syncs up. The barriers to getting a Facebook account are actually pretty high, and constantly getting higher.
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June 25, 2019, 11:56:37 AM
Merited by vapourminer (1)
 #39

Where is the privacy and security that fb is boasting to its consumers? It seems that if you are an ardent fb user and posting your pics all the time, your privacy is already gone.

Privacy was always a lie. The dollar cost to set up a Facebook account is zero. The dollar cost to use their platform is zero. This doesn't mean it's free. The cost of using Facebook is measured in personal data. They take everything they have about you, run it through increasingly sophisticated models to fill in the gaps, and then sell it. For me the scandal isn't so much that Facebook sells personal data, it's that governments permit them to do so. The trick these companies use is quite simple - they just move ahead of the legislation. They set up camp in an ungoverned space, and there might be some grumblings of public opposition, but FB, Google, Amazon and so on just sit there and wait it out until the clamour dies down and their behaviour of grabbing and selling all this data just becomes the new normal. It becomes established, it becomes accepted because these companies are largely unchallenged.
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