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Author Topic: Bitmain T9\S9 to Bitcoin treasure hunter device?  (Read 184 times)
OssyRozenberg
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May 09, 2020, 04:07:21 AM
Last edit: May 22, 2020, 12:42:01 AM by OssyRozenberg
 #1

For more than 9 months I have been developing a treasure hunter that will allow to return lost bitcoins in abandoned wallets. https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5213781.msg53484243#msg53484243
I do not design a cracker! It will not be able to crack modern wallets (created after 2012), old abandoned wallets only (containing up to 60% of coins, by the way) using their flaws.
Initially, it was a individual device using mining chips as a coprocessor(s) for a number of operations. This can significantly reduce the cost of the device compared to a fully FPGA solution.
However, in just a few days many popular ASICs (T9/S9 etc.) will become scrap. These are millions of free co-processors. Design a control board that can turn them into "seed-pick" seems like a good idea.

I would like to know the opinion of the community, will such a control board for the resurrection of bitmain scrap be interesting for ASIC's owners?

PS. A little about the reliability of wallets, millions years of searching and similar nonsense. Both in mining and in hunting, luck is at the basis. Finding a block using one ASIC is also difficult like finding a treasure with my device. The pool is effective in both cases.
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philipma1957
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May 09, 2020, 02:33:23 PM
 #2

For more than 9 months I have been developing a treasure hunter that will allow to return lost bitcoins in abandoned wallets. https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5213781.msg53484243#msg53484243
I do not design a cracker! It will not be able to crack modern wallets (created after 2012), old abandoned wallets only (containing up to 60% of coins, by the way) using their flaws.
Initially, it was a individual device using mining chips as a coprocessor(s) for a number of operations. This can significantly reduce the cost of the device compared to a fully FPGA solution.
However, in just a few days many popular ASICs (T9/S9 etc.) will become scrap. These are millions of free co-processors. Design a control board that can turn them into "seed-pick" seems like a good idea.

I would like to know the opinion of the community, will such a control board for the resurrection of bitmain scrap be interesting for ASIC's owners?

PS. A little about the reliability of wallets, millions years of searching and similar nonsense. Both in mining and in hunting, luck is at the basis. Finding a block using one ASIC is also difficult like finding a treasure with my device. The pool is effective in both cases.

PPS. It is not finished yet and I do not know when it will be finished. At the moment, I continue to develop for my scientific interest.

If you can try it on the old locked wallets like these

https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/15qKUySejJHRkRXCnR52yXWtj1dZaCH3bv
https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/1Mt8SWYMpdgQ8jk6S9o53PAvRHKP6bkdXR

there are lots of 50 coin addresses from block 1 to 20,000.  untouched since they were created back in 2009.


you would make 50 coins for each and every one you find.

I suppose you are brute forcing keys. and hoping for magical luck.

A question for you is how many keys a day does one s9 generate and test.  Assuming you can get the gear to do just that.  You would need a lot of luck.

There are more then 10,000 old addresses with 50 virgin coins. So that is over 500,000 coins in old wallets.

I would argue that trying to find a key that opens one is legal, but that using the key and sweeping the coins may be a criminal act.

I see BTC as the super highway and alt coins as taxis and trucks needed to move transactions.
OssyRozenberg
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May 12, 2020, 07:08:52 AM
 #3

If you can try it on the old locked wallets like these
I know these lists. They prompted me to get started.
If you read the original topic, you would see I'm not looking for a key for a particular wallet. I am creating a list of goals (wallets) in RAM FPGA. Then I go through either all combinations of the private key or all combinations of seed phrases (there are much fewer, plus it is possible to reduce their number due to poor entropy, but the algorithm is longer here).

The trick is that you can check the goal in RAM very quickly. You should not search balance in blockchain or something like that.

If the address does not match, this key pair and address are recorded to the rainbow table for future and we continue to work.

The second trick is the more addresses in the list, the more likely it is to find a treasure. I will quote the calculation from the original topic from 12.31.19:

Take for example the Antminer S17e (64Th), whose current profitability is 0.5 btc/year.
The device contains 144 BM1397 chips with approximately 440 Gh at each.
We’ll make the calculation for a wallet protected by seed phrase with a 12-word. The English BIP39 dictionary contains 2048 words. The old wallet is usually encrypted in English.
((2048 ^ 12) / (144 * (440^9))) / (86400 * 365) = 1939618 years it will take one ASIC to search for all the combinations.
However, if we’ll track 10,000 wallets, then 1939618/10000 = 194 years to search for at least one match. And even if we have 100 ASICs, it turns out 2 years to search for at least one match (based on average luck).

For 2 years, these same 100 ASICs will get 2*100*0.5 = 100 bitcoins. Provided there are no changes in the network’s hashrate and the power of ASICs (NO).

These calculations are very simplified, but they show the order of numbers. And this proves the possibility of finding treasures with the usual farm's power.


Finding keys is not illegal. Then you can announce that the key for the wallet XXXX is found and ask the owner to withdraw coins. If he does not respond, it is regarded as a treasure and can be legalized accordingly IMHO.

My algorithm only searches for wallets starting with 1. Withdraw to a more modern wallet will completely protect coins.

And do not forget that Bitcoin is constantly evolving. There is a huge difference to find by 12 words or by 24, for HD or no e.g. I proceed from the assumption that the old wallet is encoded with no more than 12 words in English (or not using seed at all) and this reduces the complexity of the search to an acceptable level. For the latest wallets, this does not work and requires much more power...
OssyRozenberg
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May 22, 2020, 12:41:35 AM
 #4

khe khe https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/17XiVVooLcdCUCMf9s4t4jTExacxwFS5uh
OssyRozenberg
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June 02, 2020, 11:26:05 AM
 #5

The next one old address was opened  Smiley https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/1Lhb1PsvzgDDzZkWRNRAPSy9Uu8xFnNRzL
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June 02, 2020, 01:36:18 PM
 #6


Does that mean you are now richer by a total of 100 BTC which you somehow managed to save from some old addresses? Usually the only proof that you own these addresses is to sign a message from them, which again does not necessarily mean that you hacked them in some way, but that you may also be their old owner Wink

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