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Author Topic: Wallet.dat  (Read 240 times)
Kaonashi1993
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March 25, 2020, 04:45:53 AM
 #1

is there a possibility or any program would know what character (en,ru,chi,jpn,etc..) I've used to lock my wallet.dat on bitcoin core anyone who can answer would be a great relief for me I've seen some topic ago here on bitcointalk don't know if this by gavinandersen who's by his program would know if its a general ASII encoding locking this said wallet,

Kaonashi1993
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March 25, 2020, 05:48:15 AM
 #2

is there a possibility or any program would know what character (en,ru,chi,jpn,etc..) I've used to lock my wallet.dat on bitcoin core anyone who can answer would be a great relief for me I've seen some topic ago here on bitcointalk don't know if this by gavinandersen who's by his program would know if its a general ASII encoding locking this said wallet,

Kaonashi1993

I don't think so. That would require breaking AES-256, which is presently considered unbreakable by brute force.

Non-ASCII characters are allowed, so you've got some very large word lists to consider.

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March 25, 2020, 11:56:05 AM
Merited by ETFbitcoin (1)
 #3

the password is salted and run through a hash function and the hash is then used to encrypt the wallet file. so the password isn't stored in the wallet file and there's no way to know what characters were in it.

if you have some idea what the password might be what you can do is make a list of possible passwords to narrow down the possibilities and then use a program to bruteforce the password. maybe hashcat or btcrecover can be used for this purpose
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March 25, 2020, 12:55:33 PM
Last edit: March 26, 2020, 06:24:53 AM by keychainX
 #4

is there a possibility or any program would know what character (en,ru,chi,jpn,etc..) I've used to lock my wallet.dat on bitcoin core anyone who can answer would be a great relief for me I've seen some topic ago here on bitcointalk don't know if this by gavinandersen who's by his program would know if its a general ASII encoding locking this said wallet,

Kaonashi1993


In some cases the label of your wallet address is in plain text inside the wallet.dat

Open the wallet.dat with a texteditor like notepad in windows or textedit on mac

Search for the string "name" following this string usually there is the address and in same cases a wallet label.

I have encountered labels in english, chinese and English

You can also use pywallet on github to dump the wallet info into a json file and the label will also show up, this is more technical and you need python 2.7 installed. You can find pywallet on github.com

/KX

Kaonashi1993
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March 26, 2020, 01:47:04 AM
 #5

this is what I've seen on my wallet so far any indications?      ( name"1HwYQZ82uAitbV8gfVuWXrtwFRhLA2uWQ2   ( name"15mXhu5uNRfHTKofoThesNpUQFKhoHYewq C 0・タツMⅵ2ネ・8_s彩ホzナ
・rカ鴈カノィ[qd#・Hミ叟・F・f・ヒ・    n・        mkey   1 0qムG・ ヨエ.ア 釗g2+`蠇w交フ・Zp・睡pラM・秧Xヘkシc' ckey!貼ョQ゙0s0キ7ア・・・evvJ   ョ・「・  1 0肯#赦・・・ケ゚P・;・Oh劦組Rヤ`ハqワ瘍~:」マ' ckey!匤風^1i QViD・フ"QオリU傅評カ  1 0ネa=ノエ・サ淕&_・俎段Q・ 昤J郛]・・Jオチ ・゚BV・' ckey!肢タCユサ旡ツCソ鯰6pB・C偂ハ|  1 0vy・p・・ュロ便「瀾ムY・yヤTオ[M*・・ J
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March 26, 2020, 04:20:03 AM
Merited by bones261 (4), ETFbitcoin (1)
 #6

-gibberish data-   mkey   1 0qムG・ ヨエ.ア 釗g2+`蠇w交フ・Zp・睡pラM・秧Xヘkシc' ckey!貼ョQ゙0s0キ7ア・・・evv  -gibberish data-
Those characters are just the interpretation of whatever text editor that you've used to open the wallet.dat file.

If it's configured to use 'Unicode', 'ANSII' or 'UTF-8', then it will encode whatever it can find that matched the byte-representation of that characters.
Other parts that didn't have any "match" are the ''.

In short: Your Notepad is guessing the contents of your wallet.dat file.

achow101
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March 27, 2020, 03:27:39 AM
Last edit: March 28, 2020, 04:55:21 AM by achow101
Merited by ETFbitcoin (1)
 #7

In some cases the label of your wallet address is in plain text inside the wallet.dat

Open the wallet.dat with a texteditor like notepad in windows or textedit on mac
Inspecting the wallet.dat file will not help him decrypt the wallet. It is pointless to try to do that and will result in extreme confusion and lead nowhere.

If you have forgotten your passphrase completely, there is nothing that you can do to unlock the wallet. If you have some memory of what the passphrase could be, you could try using the btcrecover utility to try to brute force the passphrase. But it probably will not succeed if you have no idea what the passphrase could be.

ewaspiro
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March 27, 2020, 05:50:42 PM
 #8

In some cases the label of your wallet address is in plain text inside the wallet.dat

Open the wallet.dat with a texteditor like notepad in windows or textedit on mac
Inspecting the wallet.dat file will not help him decrypt the wallet. It is pointless to try to do that and will result in extreme confusion and lead nowhere.

If you have forgotten your passphrase completely, there is nothing that you can do to unlock the wallet. If you have some memory of what the passphrase could be, you could try using the btcrecover[url] utility to try to brute force the passphrase. But it probably will not succeed if you have no idea what the passphrase could be.

The questions was not regarding decryption but ways figure out language used and seeing the label is the best shot.

I have experience of pywallet.py dump and I believe its the best way to see if you can figure put language if the person creating the wallet DID label it.

peace.

CODER FOR HIRE
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March 28, 2020, 04:56:47 AM
 #9

The questions was not regarding decryption but ways figure out language used and seeing the label is the best shot.

I have experience of pywallet.py dump and I believe its the best way to see if you can figure put language if the person creating the wallet DID label it.

peace.
Then tell him to open it up in Bitcoin Core where it displays the labels for you! No need to inspect the wallet.dat or use pywallet.

walletrecovery
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March 31, 2020, 05:02:45 PM
 #10

is there a possibility or any program would know what character (en,ru,chi,jpn,etc..) I've used to lock my wallet.dat on bitcoin core anyone who can answer would be a great relief for me I've seen some topic ago here on bitcointalk don't know if this by gavinandersen who's by his program would know if its a general ASII encoding locking this said wallet,

Kaonashi1993

Which language was used for encryption is impossible, but inside the wallet there is a lot of information that may indirectly relate to resources that have a trace of the language spoken by the wallet owner.

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March 31, 2020, 09:23:43 PM
 #11

Which language was used for encryption is impossible, but inside the wallet there is a lot of information that may indirectly relate to resources that have a trace of the language spoken by the wallet owner.
As achow101 said... you don't need to mess about with the pywallet dump or inspecting the wallet.dat file. Even an encrypted/locked wallet.dat can be loaded and viewed in Bitcoin Core without knowing the passphrase.

You only need to use the passphrase should you wish to do anything involving the "private" data... that is to say, any action requiring access to private keys (such as dumping the wallet.dat, signing a transaction, exporting private keys etc).

So, if you simply put the wallet.dat in the Bitcoin Core data directory and start Bitcoin Core, you'll be able to see the entire transaction history, all the addresses AND any labels that were given to addresses/transactions.

Kaonashi1993
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April 01, 2020, 10:22:59 PM
 #12

This is a bit late but I'm not trying to find whatever resemblance to let's say privatekey or any other key what I'm trying to achieve here is, finding the password been used to lock the wallet.dat if there is any indication inside the format of Berkeley that will tell this is the password been used ANCII, UTF8 or anything related hieroglyph and so forth,

I'd try to open the wallet.dat file on bitcoincore and all it's information was the wallet purpose is unknown as you may refer to my other thread https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5235495.msg54097168#msg54097168

I've tackling this wallet for a longer period of time and I might also quit my job decoding this wallet,
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April 01, 2020, 11:04:51 PM
Merited by ETFbitcoin (3)
 #13

There is absolutely nothing in the wallet.dat that will reveal what the passphrase is. There is no encoding information, no metadata, nothing. The passphrase is taken in as a series of bytes, hashed and turned into pseudorandom bytes which is then used to encrypt another series of randomly generated bytes which is what actually encrypts the private keys. NONE of the bytes derived from the passphrase is even stored in the wallet at all. It's all held in memory and purged when no longer needed. The actual encryption key is not text nor is it the passphrase. It's just random data.

Again, as has been repeated so many times to you. use btcrecover to brute force the passphrase. Inspecting the wallet.dat file by hand is not useful and is not going to help you.

Kaonashi1993
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April 02, 2020, 01:40:42 AM
 #14

Sorry for being so persistent to look at the encrypted wallet.dat, happen is all I'm looking was bytes after bytes after bytes just add the randomness could make someone paranoid as myself  Huh but foremost thank you being there to answer dumb question and ignorant knowledge which oneself had, still eager to learn so much, I'll locking the thread now,   
There is absolutely nothing in the wallet.dat that will reveal what the passphrase is. There is no encoding information, no metadata, nothing. The passphrase is taken in as a series of bytes, hashed and turned into pseudorandom bytes which is then used to encrypt another series of randomly generated bytes which is what actually encrypts the private keys. NONE of the bytes derived from the passphrase is even stored in the wallet at all. It's all held in memory and purged when no longer needed. The actual encryption key is not text nor is it the passphrase. It's just random data.

Again, as has been repeated so many times to you. use btcrecover to brute force the passphrase. Inspecting the wallet.dat file by hand is not useful and is not going to help you.
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