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Author Topic: Awesome free state project open to bitcoin donations  (Read 36186 times)
MoonShadow
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April 05, 2011, 02:16:58 AM
 #281

I accept your points, as plausible and logical. I disagree with the cost of production and estimation of losses.

The cost of production of Prison Break is just taken from Wikipedia. It is not infallible, but that's the numbers I've seen. Prison Break was especially covered in the news for being the most popular TV Series that "no-one" saw on TV.


I saw the first season of Prison Break on TV, but after that they quickly lost their muse.  The plot of the first season, the idea that an intelligent person would first engineer a new prison, arrange to get his brother transfered there, and then get convicted to be sent there, and have his break-out plan encoded onto his skin as a tatoo is pretty cool.  But once they were out, it was just like so many other drama shows I've seen before.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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April 05, 2011, 01:59:20 PM
 #282

Probably not because of arbitrary thresholds of 'common knowledge' and 'common heritage' and 'copyright expiration' which will be codified into the constitution. Wouldn't it be interesting if normal property had such limits? This bike is mine for ten years, then it is owned by no one and usable by anyone!
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April 05, 2011, 02:15:40 PM
 #283

Probably not because of arbitrary thresholds of 'common knowledge' and 'common heritage' and 'copyright expiration' which will be codified into the constitution. Wouldn't it be interesting if normal property had such limits? This bike is mine for ten years, then it is owned by no one and usable by anyone!
Show me the receipt or I'm taking my new bike out for a spin, lol

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deadlizard
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April 05, 2011, 02:46:10 PM
 #284

Is there a digital equivalent to archaeology? Probably not, because Indiana Jones would fear being sued by Microhotep...
*groooooaaaan*

As for digital archaeology just look at the Mame project.

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EvanR
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April 05, 2011, 04:11:00 PM
 #285

Probably. Arcade machines are ideas, simulating someone's machine on your computer for your own purposes is immoral.
onarchy
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April 06, 2011, 02:44:10 PM
 #286

Or this... Would this be considered 'theft' in a Free State?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/opinion/24darnton.html?_r=1
Quote
A number of countries are also determined to out-Google Google by scanning the entire contents of their national libraries. France is spending 750 million euros to digitize its cultural treasures; the National Library of the Netherlands is trying to digitize every Dutch book and periodical published since 1470; Australia, Finland and Norway are undertaking their own efforts.

Generally speaking libraries and digitalization of works that are in the public domain are completely unproblematic, and I applaud such private efforts (e.g. the Gutenberg Project), although government has no business doing running libraries. In general, with copyrighted material libraries become problematic, unless the IP owner explicitly chooses to allow libraries to use his work, and with digital books this becomes even more problematic. There are several solutions to this and one model is that philanthropists who want to share books with the world can make a deal with the author to e.g. buy the rights to place them in the public domain, or to buy a certain amount of licenses at bulk prices.

Libraries made a whole lot of sense back in the days when the act of copying books was the expensive part, but nowadays libraries are really out of date.

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April 06, 2011, 04:05:22 PM
 #287

But for how long, What if it took a 1000 years for a work to become Public Domain? The length of these protections are getting ridiculous. Death +86 years, what is that?  

Lets compromise, anything after 20 years becomes public domain. Free for anyone to use however they see fit.

I am also for an OpenPatent system (voluntary), which guarantees that a product does what it says it does and gives credit to the inventor, but the money goes to whomever makes the best use of the patent. The Key is that another company can't use the traditional patent system with a product from the OpenPatent system. If I invent the anti-gravity machine, it and any products based off of it shall remain in the OpenPatent system an can not be put into the traditional.

Libraries need to change, but the most efficient means of archiving is still paper. CD = 100 years, Microfiche = 500 years, Paper = thousands, Stone would be the best but not very efficient.

Magnetic is a stupid medium to archive as its life is almost Random, and easily destroyed.  Remember those magnetic tape erasers they used to sell at Radio Shack that you plugged into the wall pulled a trigger and erased several cassettes at once, Somebody with one of those could bypass all security programs, passwords, etc... put it next to a computer and fry it. Actually I think they could fry just about anything with electronics and/or a hard drive.

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April 06, 2011, 04:39:19 PM
 #288

In a free state economy, the mess of a road system we have today would be radically changed over time. You most likely would not find a no parking zone but something a bit more profitable for both parties.
MoonShadow
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April 06, 2011, 06:00:07 PM
 #289


Magnetic is a stupid medium to archive as its life is almost Random, and easily destroyed.  Remember those magnetic tape erasers they used to sell at Radio Shack that you plugged into the wall pulled a trigger and erased several cassettes at once, Somebody with one of those could bypass all security programs, passwords, etc... put it next to a computer and fry it. Actually I think they could fry just about anything with electronics and/or a hard drive.

This used to be true, but try it now and you aren't even likely to harm a modern hard drive, and might not even disrupt a running (GNU/Linux) server enough to get a kernel panic.  Modern magnetic drives have pretty effective shielding.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
wb3
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April 06, 2011, 06:08:35 PM
 #290


Magnetic is a stupid medium to archive as its life is almost Random, and easily destroyed.  Remember those magnetic tape erasers they used to sell at Radio Shack that you plugged into the wall pulled a trigger and erased several cassettes at once, Somebody with one of those could bypass all security programs, passwords, etc... put it next to a computer and fry it. Actually I think they could fry just about anything with electronics and/or a hard drive.

This used to be true, but try it now and you aren't even likely to harm a modern hard drive, and might not even disrupt a running (GNU/Linux) server enough to get a kernel panic.  Modern magnetic drives have pretty effective shielding.

They make Degaussers for Hard Drives http://www.garner-products.com/CDS-4400ED.htm

Just a portable version and voila; Destroy all data in anyones Hard Drive, All Data, and because inductive fields cause electrical currents, I bet it would fry some of the electronics too.

It is actually the safest and easiest way to destroy a hard drive. People use software because the drive is still usable afterwards, with a degausser, its toast.

I use to use a portable one on the old Tube TV's for the funny effects it would cause. But Tubes were very resilient, but if you timed it right, you could release the trigger at the right moment and magnetize the Horizontal and Vertical deflection plates for the electron gun to get weird pictures.

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deadlizard
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April 06, 2011, 06:18:36 PM
 #291


Magnetic is a stupid medium to archive as its life is almost Random, and easily destroyed.  Remember those magnetic tape erasers they used to sell at Radio Shack that you plugged into the wall pulled a trigger and erased several cassettes at once, Somebody with one of those could bypass all security programs, passwords, etc... put it next to a computer and fry it. Actually I think they could fry just about anything with electronics and/or a hard drive.

This used to be true, but try it now and you aren't even likely to harm a modern hard drive, and might not even disrupt a running (GNU/Linux) server enough to get a kernel panic.  Modern magnetic drives have pretty effective shielding.

They make Degaussers for Hard Drives http://www.garner-products.com/CDS-4400ED.htm

Just a portable version and voila; Destroy all data in anyones Hard Drive, All Data, and because inductive fields cause electrical currents, I bet it would fry some of the electronics too.

It is actually the safest and easiest way to destroy a hard drive. People use software because the drive is still usable afterwards, with a degausser, its toast.

I use to use a portable one on the old Tube TV's for the funny effects it would cause. But Tubes were very resilient, but if you timed it right, you could release the trigger at the right moment and magnetize the Horizontal and Vertical deflection plates for the electron gun to get weird pictures.
That would have been awesome. I used to use hard drive magnets to mess with monitors at school  Cool

Had a few cassette tapes that I left on top of a speaker and the sound would fade in and out.
Left my wallet on top of a speaker once and corrupted my bank card. the replacement fee ensured I never did that again.
Magnetic media is the suck.

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wb3
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April 06, 2011, 06:33:56 PM
 #292

Not that I am destructive, but it would be funny watching the IT department running around trying to find out who breached their security software and deleted their data. It would drive them nuts. They would probably blame anonymous.

Beware though if you try to do it. Once they discovered that the magnetic servo data was erased off of the hard drive, they would then know it was a physical attack.  The magnetic medium for the servo data, can not be written to once it is out of the factory.

here is a good article:

Irreversible damage to some media types

Many forms of generic magnetic storage media can be reused after degaussing, including audio reel-to-reel tape and VHS videocassettes. These older media types are simply a raw medium which are overwritten with fresh new patterns, created by fixed-alignment read/write heads.
For certain forms of computer data storage, however, such as modern hard drives and some tape backup drives, degaussing renders the magnetic media completely unusable and damages the storage system. This is due to the devices having an infinitely variable read/write head positioning mechanism which relies on special servo control data that is meant to be permanently embedded into the magnetic media. This servo data is written onto the media a single time at the factory using special-purpose servo writing hardware.
The servo patterns are normally never overwritten by the device for any reason and are used to precisely position the read/write heads over data tracks on the media, to compensate for sudden jarring device movements, thermal expansion, or changes in orientation. Degaussing indiscriminately removes not only the stored data but also removes the servo control data, and without the servo data the device is no longer able to determine where data is to be read or written on the magnetic medium.

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onarchy
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April 07, 2011, 02:12:49 AM
 #293

Imagine you are a consumer of something that may or may not be someone's IP, a designer, programmer, etc...

You see something like this:



What do?

If you have the resources, you lawyer up.
If you don't, you pretty much disregard it.
For all practical purposes...

How would this work in a Free State?

I didn't understand the contract, and I guess that was your point. Generally speaking it is a huge problem with massive EULAs that no-one reads, yet everyone accepts and trusts are not draconian. It is so much more practical to have implicit contracts that are approved by the law makers on behalf of a significant majority of the population. Implicit contracts are practical since most people find them reasonable (otherwise they would not have been voted to be law by a significant majority). Those who want to deviate from the implicit contract must either write an entire EULA or write the *deviations* from the implicit contract.

This aligns the self-interest of all parties. If a software company wants to sell software to MANY people it is very smart to use the implicit contract voted for by the MANY. If a software company wants to sell to a minority then that minority will not mind the EULA since they belong to the minority who may not like the implicit contract. If however a software company wants to sell to the MANY but also don't want to abide by their wishes and follow the implicit contract, they will be at a severe disadvantage because they will have to harass people with a cumbersome EULA.

However, there is a very high treshold for something to become an implicit contract by law, and private contract firms could easily get a "nice to have" implicit contract law overturned by showing that there exists a private, peaceful alternative. This could be similar to a "people who liked X also liked Y"-service. I.e. "people who found contract X reasonable also found contract Y reasonable." With such technology available you could easily migrate from implicit contract laws to explicit contracts mediated by a private firm of your choice.

Implicit contracts of the "nice to have"-kind should in general be avoided, and only reserved for implicit contracts where there is serious risk of violations involved. E.g. implicit contract laws against killing without consent will never be lifted. It will always be assumed that people don't want to die unless explicitly stated in very certain terms.
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April 07, 2011, 02:32:01 AM
 #294

As long as theres no oil the Us wont invade lol.

lol.  good point.  It would be wise to first test for oil, and only start building this free state if they don't find any... Smiley

"We will not find a solution to political problems in cryptography, but we can win a major battle in the arms race and gain a new territory of freedom for several years.

Governments are good at cutting off the heads of a centrally controlled networks, but pure P2P networks are holding their own."
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April 07, 2011, 04:29:31 AM
 #295

It is sounding like Free State will pretty much resemble an industrial park populated with warehouses and lawyers.

hehe!!!  Oh crap...that already exists!  It's called "New Jersey".

"We will not find a solution to political problems in cryptography, but we can win a major battle in the arms race and gain a new territory of freedom for several years.

Governments are good at cutting off the heads of a centrally controlled networks, but pure P2P networks are holding their own."
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April 07, 2011, 04:49:14 AM
 #296

It is sounding like Free State will pretty much resemble an industrial park populated with warehouses and lawyers.

And to me it sounds like you are really wanting the Free State to resemble and industrial park populated with warehouses and lawyers so that you can justify your views on IP.
deadlizard
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April 07, 2011, 05:27:45 AM
 #297

Then please, what is your aesthetic vision for Free State?
"Free State" is an oxymoron

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onarchy
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April 07, 2011, 06:02:00 AM
 #298

Then please, what is your aesthetic vision for Free State?

I think I capture it to a significant degree in our website, i.e. a greener and less crowded version of Singapore and Hong Kong.

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