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Author Topic: Cheaper In Bitcoins - Redefining its game  (Read 2743 times)
FlipPro
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December 18, 2011, 05:55:13 PM
 #21

CIB AIN'T DEAD YET... YOU PEOPLE AREN'T LISTENING LOL..

Looking forward to the reorganization of your business Xenland.

There are ton's of products that ONLY Bitcoiners will buy, and I promise you most of these people don't even know it yet  Wink.

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cbeast
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Let's talk governance, lipstick, and pigs.


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December 18, 2011, 06:50:38 PM
 #22

CIB AIN'T DEAD YET... YOU PEOPLE AREN'T LISTENING LOL..

Looking forward to the reorganization of your business Xenland.

There are ton's of products that ONLY Bitcoiners will buy, and I promise you most of these people don't even know it yet  Wink.
The genie is out of the bottle. It's time to start thinking outside the box. I know it sounds corny, but you ain't seen nothing yet.

Any significantly advanced cryptocurrency is indistinguishable from Ponzi Tulips.
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December 18, 2011, 07:05:05 PM
 #23

The thing is, people sell amazon gift cards for bitcoins. So any store eventually just competes with amazon by proxy.

The best would just be a storefront that sells giftcards to all of the major sites. Put on a markup of a $1-$2 and you have yourself a profit model without the messy details of physical inventory.

Also, make it so others can sell giftcards on your website. A lot of people get unwanted gift cards for christmas. This will make it so you don't have to handle dollars.

Hello,  btcinstant essentially sells giftcards to all of the major online websites for a couple of dollars. Also, you can re-load them to spend them again at that particular merchant.  Unwanted gift cards are pretty big on the internet this is true. It will be good to CIB back in action!
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December 18, 2011, 11:52:48 PM
 #24

Good first effort. I look forward to CIB 2.0

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December 19, 2011, 12:29:27 AM
 #25

Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.
Raoul Duke
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December 19, 2011, 01:13:40 AM
 #26

Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.

And don't forget about our beloved customs office, they love to charge us 23% VAT and storage fees Wink

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December 19, 2011, 04:35:40 AM
 #27

Looking for niche Bitcoin products...

I just want to say two words to you,

Two words. Are you listening?

There's a great future in Alpaca socks. Think about it. Will you think about it?

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December 19, 2011, 04:39:43 AM
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Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.

And don't forget about our beloved customs office, they love to charge us 23% VAT and storage fees Wink

Interesting! So if one supplied item in the manufacturing link chain were purchased with Bitcoin, would that make the final cost lower for company A, who's competing with company B, in regards to the pricing concern, alone? Brand recognition or quality of product does not come into play when answering this question.
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December 19, 2011, 04:47:05 AM
 #29

Looking for niche Bitcoin products...

I just want to say two words to you,

Two words. Are you listening?

There's a great future in Alpaca socks. Think about it. Will you think about it?


I thought about it. Let's take the Alpaca Socks niche one step further. Would you rather put on your next sock puppet show with an ordinary sock, or with an adopted one-of-kind Alpaca Sock Puppet. No two are alike, just like the Cabbage Patch Dolls. And you can only purchase them with Bitcoin.


nmat
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December 19, 2011, 05:18:05 AM
 #30

Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.

And don't forget about our beloved customs office, they love to charge us 23% VAT and storage fees Wink

Interesting! So if one supplied item in the manufacturing link chain were purchased with Bitcoin, would that make the final cost lower for company A, who's competing with company B, in regards to the pricing concern, alone? Brand recognition or quality of product does not come into play when answering this question.


I'm not sure I understood your question. The problem here is that bitcoin business are in the US and Amazon UK has free shipping for Europe (and since the items come from within the EU, we also do not pay the 23% extra). This means that I don't pay anything extra to order from Amazon and I get my item in a couple of days. Unless an european store starts accepting bitcoins, this is really to compete with.
Phinnaeus Gage
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December 19, 2011, 06:23:21 AM
 #31

Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.

And don't forget about our beloved customs office, they love to charge us 23% VAT and storage fees Wink

Interesting! So if one supplied item in the manufacturing link chain were purchased with Bitcoin, would that make the final cost lower for company A, who's competing with company B, in regards to the pricing concern, alone? Brand recognition or quality of product does not come into play when answering this question.


I'm not sure I understood your question. The problem here is that bitcoin business are in the US and Amazon UK has free shipping for Europe (and since the items come from within the EU, we also do not pay the 23% extra). This means that I don't pay anything extra to order from Amazon and I get my item in a couple of days. Unless an european store starts accepting bitcoins, this is really to compete with.

My reply stems from this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_added_tax
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December 19, 2011, 07:09:23 AM
 #32

Bitcoin is a nerdy geek project. And most of the people using bitcoin don't have much use for too many physical goods- my entire belongings fit into one backpack. And many geeky people from experience are poor.
Raoul Duke
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December 19, 2011, 01:33:05 PM
 #33

Another problem for stores selling physical items is that Bitcoin users are all around the globe. I am in Europe so I would have to pay a lot to ship items here.

And don't forget about our beloved customs office, they love to charge us 23% VAT and storage fees Wink

Interesting! So if one supplied item in the manufacturing link chain were purchased with Bitcoin, would that make the final cost lower for company A, who's competing with company B, in regards to the pricing concern, alone? Brand recognition or quality of product does not come into play when answering this question.


I'm not sure I understood your question. The problem here is that bitcoin business are in the US and Amazon UK has free shipping for Europe (and since the items come from within the EU, we also do not pay the 23% extra). This means that I don't pay anything extra to order from Amazon and I get my item in a couple of days. Unless an european store starts accepting bitcoins, this is really to compete with.

There is one shop already accepting Bitcoin. http://loja.pmakordeoneditora.pt
Only ships to Portugal tho, and ofcourse, Amazon should be cheaper for several reasons(VAT, quantities sold, etc.), but the alternative exists Wink

istar
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December 19, 2011, 04:36:37 PM
 #34

It's definitely a problem, there isn't much you can't buy with fiat.  Opening a regular store (except with bitcoins!) is pretty much doomed to failure before it begins.  Digital goods like indie music and games is a good idea, but getting the word out to enough people to make it worth it would be difficult.  There's also the issue of the libertarian stance on piracy/intellectual property rights, that would hurt business.  Steam did a lot to curb piracy on the PC with their sales and easy installs/downloads but it took a long time and a lot of money for Steam to get where it is now.  

Not if what is being offered only accepts payments in Bitcoin, and there's a huge demand.

Example:

Say, for the sake of argument, the builder of an Angry-Birds-type-game is a Bitcoiner, and he just released the app, which is free to play. Free, until you want to upgrade, that is. And who doesn't want to upgrade? To purchase the upgrades, you must have Bitcoin. The players will figure out in a damn hurry where and how to get Bitcoin. Then somebody else comes along and makes it even easier to transfer fiat into Bitcoin so that the popular game can be played some more.

After reading the above, I'm sure other examples have now popped in your (the reader) mind(s).

This would certainly be a boon for Bitcoin. But I don't think it's happened, yet. I'm thinking, when this happens, it will have to be for "political" reasons, because it simply doesn't make economic sense to limit your market to Bitcoin at the moment. Or maybe there are some motivations I'm missing. Don't get me wrong, I realize Bitcoin is much better than other options at certain things, but I'm not the average consumer either.

It could if you invested and owned lots of Bitcoins and want to make Bitcoins more attractive.

Bitcoins - Because we should not pay to use our money
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