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Author Topic: "You should assume your IP address can be associated with you.." -Gavin Anderson  (Read 4751 times)
snarlpill
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July 19, 2014, 10:55:23 PM
 #61


Or you could use blockchain.info and use TOR to connect to blockchain.info

I've never been able to fully access the wallet section of blockchain.info using TOR, anybody else had these problems?

Though TOR is not safe anymore itself unless you are taking multiple other steps with it together.

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July 20, 2014, 03:44:50 AM
 #62

I've never been able to fully access the wallet section of blockchain.info using TOR, anybody else had these problems?

I periodically fire up Tails (ie. tor) to mix my coins via blockchain.info's service. No problem so far.

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July 20, 2014, 04:44:44 AM
 #63

Why not just go to the library lol

I don't want to go to the library every time I buy or send bitcoins. A VPN that doesn't keep logs is a much simpler solution. 
You could really just use TOR to use bitcoin. As long as an adversary doesn't previously suspect that you are using bitcoin then you have basically 0 chance of any kind of timing attack

That is probably the simplest solution. I must admit I don't know how to connect my wallet to TOR but this discussion has inspired me to find out.

From the TOR Wiki

Quote
Run bitcoind with -proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 (or whatever your SocksPort is).
bitcoind will detect that you are using a proxy on 9050 and will force the "nolisten" flag. If you are not running tor on 9050, you need to set "nolisten" manually otherwise you will listen on your public IP and possibly reveal that you are running a node.

Thanks for sharing that. I don't do anything illegal or even suspicious with bitcoin but I value my privacy. I also have a healthy fear of hackers seeing that I run a node. 

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July 20, 2014, 11:16:03 AM
 #64


Or you could use blockchain.info and use TOR to connect to blockchain.info

I've never been able to fully access the wallet section of blockchain.info using TOR, anybody else had these problems?

Though TOR is not safe anymore itself unless you are taking multiple other steps with it together.

If you look at cases where people have been identified when using TOR it's because they either had the stupid idea of logging into personally identifiable accounts at the same time as logging onto other sites they shouldn't be on.

People who assume TOR itself will keep you hidden are naive and wrong, how can one piece of software hide your identity if your foolish enough to do something like log into Facebook while on Silk Road?

Always assume someone is watching and prepare from that. That's why Bitcoin is so great, sure you can say address x did x transaction at y time, but you can't prove address x belongs to me unless I've confirmed ownership somewhere else. You could even apply this rule to IP addresses, sure that IP address is mine but can you prove it was it was me on my machine? For all you know it could have been a relative staying over or someone who decided to crack my AP and abuse it.

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July 20, 2014, 01:57:57 PM
 #65

Was their an article or something orignaly ?
OP now just says "X" - I assume their was something more exciting relating to an article or blog post or some thing worth discussing ?

Kinda annoyed I missed it. If anyone can link that would be great Smiley ??

Thanks peoples

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July 20, 2014, 02:14:03 PM
 #66


Or you could use blockchain.info and use TOR to connect to blockchain.info

I've never been able to fully access the wallet section of blockchain.info using TOR, anybody else had these problems?

Though TOR is not safe anymore itself unless you are taking multiple other steps with it together.

If you look at cases where people have been identified when using TOR it's because they either had the stupid idea of logging into personally identifiable accounts at the same time as logging onto other sites they shouldn't be on.

People who assume TOR itself will keep you hidden are naive and wrong, how can one piece of software hide your identity if your foolish enough to do something like log into Facebook while on Silk Road?

Always assume someone is watching and prepare from that. That's why Bitcoin is so great, sure you can say address x did x transaction at y time, but you can't prove address x belongs to me unless I've confirmed ownership somewhere else. You could even apply this rule to IP addresses, sure that IP address is mine but can you prove it was it was me on my machine? For all you know it could have been a relative staying over or someone who decided to crack my AP and abuse it.

Tor traffic and messages are suppose to be encrypted and randomly routed to the destination. Meaning logging in silk road and facebook at the same time shouldn't compromise the user identity.

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July 20, 2014, 03:11:28 PM
 #67

you have to be encrypting the data on your computer while offline and then sending it online with the end user already knowing how to decrypt the

data having met u in person and being provided with the decryption method their is no other possible way for it to be secure

also assuming your encryption method is strong enough not to be cracked

and when your encrypting the data offline you have to be sure their isn't a dormant process running that will deliver stored content

when your computer comes online, also yes your ip packet will always be identifiable,

can someone post a screen shot of an packet delivered on the tor network

the bitcoin blockchain is supposed to be secure because it cannot be reproduced

which is a combination of network power and encryption

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July 22, 2014, 01:13:02 AM
 #68


Or you could use blockchain.info and use TOR to connect to blockchain.info

I've never been able to fully access the wallet section of blockchain.info using TOR, anybody else had these problems?

Though TOR is not safe anymore itself unless you are taking multiple other steps with it together.

If you look at cases where people have been identified when using TOR it's because they either had the stupid idea of logging into personally identifiable accounts at the same time as logging onto other sites they shouldn't be on.

People who assume TOR itself will keep you hidden are naive and wrong, how can one piece of software hide your identity if your foolish enough to do something like log into Facebook while on Silk Road?

Always assume someone is watching and prepare from that. That's why Bitcoin is so great, sure you can say address x did x transaction at y time, but you can't prove address x belongs to me unless I've confirmed ownership somewhere else. You could even apply this rule to IP addresses, sure that IP address is mine but can you prove it was it was me on my machine? For all you know it could have been a relative staying over or someone who decided to crack my AP and abuse it.

Tor traffic and messages are suppose to be encrypted and randomly routed to the destination. Meaning logging in silk road and facebook at the same time shouldn't compromise the user identity.
If you log into both from the same computer then an attacker could potentially do a timing attack against you.

In order for TOR to work best, it is important that you do not use any other browsers to programs connected to the internet when using TOR.

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July 22, 2014, 06:30:46 PM
 #69


Speaking of TOR, this just popped up on my fixture news search tab:

  http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/07/22/cybercrime-conference-talk-tor-idINKBN0FR05V20140722

The banking crisis of the 2007-ish timeframe was partially solved by changing the accounting rules for banks (or allowing certain rules to not be ignored and assets 'marked to model') which kept banks in the banks balance sheets in the black or close enough.  It looks to me like the robustness for purpose for TOR might be solved in a substantively different but equally ludicrous manner.


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