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Author Topic: Making PCI-E x1 to x16 with power  (Read 2488 times)
PulsedMedia
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March 12, 2012, 04:43:20 AM
 #1

I got a bunch PCI-E x1 extenders but need to add power to them most likely. I recall some people having connectors "frying" without the added power.

I can't remember the pin numbers to which put the +12V and ground leads.

Anyone got a link where the specs were or a how-to?
Don't want to get this incorrect and fry a few 7970s Cheesy

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Roadhog2k5
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March 12, 2012, 04:44:32 AM
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http://lmgtfy.com/?q=pcie+pinout

Pro tip, all the power is in the x1 section.
PulsedMedia
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March 12, 2012, 04:49:03 AM
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Lol ofc, that's the way i found it last time. Guess too tired this morning. http://pinouts.ru/Slots/pci_express_pinout.shtml

Trouble is the extenders i've seen have only used 1 pair on each side, if i use that pin out i have to connect A LOT of wires.
Also from that it's not 100% clear which is side B and which is side A. screw-up here can become costly. Hence, i'm asking.

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Roadhog2k5
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March 12, 2012, 04:50:57 AM
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Lol ofc, that's the way i found it last time. Guess too tired this morning. http://pinouts.ru/Slots/pci_express_pinout.shtml

Trouble is the extenders i've seen have only used 1 pair on each side, if i use that pin out i have to connect A LOT of wires.
Also from that it's not 100% clear which is side B and which is side A. screw-up here can become costly. Hence, i'm asking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express#Pinout
PulsedMedia
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March 12, 2012, 04:58:33 AM
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Lol ofc, that's the way i found it last time. Guess too tired this morning. http://pinouts.ru/Slots/pci_express_pinout.shtml

Trouble is the extenders i've seen have only used 1 pair on each side, if i use that pin out i have to connect A LOT of wires.
Also from that it's not 100% clear which is side B and which is side A. screw-up here can become costly. Hence, i'm asking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express#Pinout

Ok, that actually makes it rather simple, only question remains is side B pins 2,3. Should these be connected, they are bright yellow and not on legend, the other yellow is reserved, not to be connected.
I guess i'll connect side A 2+3 and #4 on both sides

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haploid23
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March 19, 2012, 12:10:41 AM
 #6

The concept is pretty simple, but doing it takes a bit of precision and patience. Not sure if I understand you correctly, but you basically want to ONLY connect all 12v lines together. So you'll need to splice out pins 2 and 3 from side A, splice out pins 1, 2, and 3 from side B, and join the 5 wires together, then solder all of this to the one power cable. You need to be careful not to cut or break the presence pin (pin 1 on side A) since that is the one lone wire sticking out after the splicing.

PulsedMedia
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March 19, 2012, 12:32:48 AM
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The concept is pretty simple, but doing it takes a bit of precision and patience. Not sure if I understand you correctly, but you basically want to ONLY connect all 12v lines together. So you'll need to splice out pins 2 and 3 from side A, splice out pins 1, 2, and 3 from side B, and join the 5 wires together, then solder all of this to the one power cable. You need to be careful not to cut or break the presence pin (pin 1 on side A) since that is the one lone wire sticking out after the splicing.

ehrm, if you only connect the +12V what is going to ground it?
Hence no power delivered as expected, grounding would still happen via mobo and same burning effect will happen if that was required.

Grounding has to happen via some route. Probably the stupidest and most popular misconception/myth about electricity is "Grounding doesn't matter so mcuh, so it's ok if we use this 1mm2 ground with the 16mm2 power cable" (I've actually seen that with cars, barely any grounding, huge positive cable, end result: Burning wires)

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vapourminer
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March 19, 2012, 10:52:33 AM
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ehrm, if you only connect the +12V what is going to ground it?
Hence no power delivered as expected, grounding would still happen via mobo and same burning effect will happen if that was required.

no, it wont.

there are 9 ground pins on a x1 connector, and it goes to the mobos ground plane. ground is ground at that point (and its a huge, relatively speaking, amount of copper) and its shared among all PSU ground wires that directly connect to the mobo. count em up; there are a lot.

the original burning problem was (in almost all cases) the limited number +12v power connectors to the PCIe bus via the AUX connector. not the ground path.
PulsedMedia
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March 20, 2012, 01:26:15 AM
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no, it wont.

there are 9 ground pins on a x1 connector, and it goes to the mobos ground plane. ground is ground at that point (and its a huge, relatively speaking, amount of copper) and its shared among all PSU ground wires that directly connect to the mobo. count em up; there are a lot.

the original burning problem was (in almost all cases) the limited number +12v power connectors to the PCIe bus via the AUX connector. not the ground path.

Actually you are probably right, i did not check the ground connector count *whups*
Well, in any case, it's a good idea to also include extra grounding, just for that extra safety margin Smiley

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