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Author Topic: [Closed]Windows 7, Vista, XP, Server 2003 and 2008 serial keys @ 2BTC  (Read 8110 times)
demonofelru
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May 04, 2011, 06:24:55 PM
 #21

But there is still one thing You don't understand: a key only gets blocked when it gets activated a massive amount of times from several locations around the world.
I sell one particular key only once, to one person.
If another buyer asks for one, i'll get an other key from an other MSDN account.

You're wrong there are other ways/reasons they blacklist keys.  

Edit: I bought a technet sub and shared a single key with my friend.  It was later blacklisted and my subscription closed.  Like I said I know from personal experience.  Stop spreading lies and be honest with your potential customers.

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TehJoker
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May 04, 2011, 06:31:58 PM
 #22

But there is still one thing You don't understand: a key only gets blocked when it gets activated a massive amount of times from several locations around the world.
I sell one particular key only once, to one person.
If another buyer asks for one, i'll get an other key from an other MSDN account.

You're wrong there are other ways/reasons they blacklist keys.  

yes, but none of those are actually possible if you use the keys like a normal person would.

examples of reasons:
you can obtain the key through a keygen
the key has been used more than 100 times on one location
the key has been used more than 5 times on different locations
the key has been made public
etc etc

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demonofelru
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May 04, 2011, 06:34:10 PM
 #23

But there is still one thing You don't understand: a key only gets blocked when it gets activated a massive amount of times from several locations around the world.
I sell one particular key only once, to one person.
If another buyer asks for one, i'll get an other key from an other MSDN account.

You're wrong there are other ways/reasons they blacklist keys.  

yes, but none of those are actually possible if you use the keys like a normal person would.

examples of reasons:
you can obtain the key through a keygen
the key has been used more than 1000 times on one location
the key has been used more than 50 times on different locations
the key has been made public
etc etc

Once again you are wrong read my edit.  Also AFAIK there are no keygens for windows that's why most pirated copies use either leaked keys or leaked keys partnered with spoof SLIC tables.  If someone could reliably generate vaild keys there would be no reason for these methods.  Admittedly that's only as far as I know, I do however know the risk is FAR greater then what you are saying.

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TehJoker
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May 04, 2011, 06:40:19 PM
 #24

i was already editing my post as soon as i saw your edit, but u were first to make a reply :p:

i say lol to your personal experience: my friend in the USA offered me to try it. I have installed win7 on my second pc with one of his technet keys yesterday while he was already working with that technet key for about a month or 2, and i still don't see anything about illegal key or blacklisted key or something like that, he didn't say anything about his technet being shut down, and my pc is updating, so i think you just were very unlucky or just lying.

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demonofelru
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May 04, 2011, 06:46:30 PM
 #25

i was already editing my post as soon as i saw your edit, but u were first to make a reply :p:

i say lol to your personal experience: my friend in the USA offered me to try it. I have installed win7 on my second pc with one of his technet keys yesterday while he was already working with that technet key for about a month or 2, and i still don't see anything about illegal key or blacklisted key or something like that, he didn't say anything about his technet being shut down, and my pc is updating, so i think you just were very unlucky or just lying.

That is why I said I don't know what other methods they have that puts up the red flag.  I have an idea on why it might have red flagged me with only one, but do not know for sure.  From what I have searched the IP address thing seems to be the most commonly accepted reason.  I can't really prove my experience but I have no need to it is commonly known these keys get blacklisted maybe your customers will be lucky maybe not but once again they deserve to know the risk.

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proudhon
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May 04, 2011, 07:43:53 PM
 #26

i was already editing my post as soon as i saw your edit, but u were first to make a reply :p:

i say lol to your personal experience: my friend in the USA offered me to try it. I have installed win7 on my second pc with one of his technet keys yesterday while he was already working with that technet key for about a month or 2, and i still don't see anything about illegal key or blacklisted key or something like that, he didn't say anything about his technet being shut down, and my pc is updating, so i think you just were very unlucky or just lying.

You're working under the assumption that because something hasn't happened in your particular case it won't happen in other cases.  Your also assuming that multiple activations of the same key from different locations is the only reason Microsoft blacklists and the only way they know whether to blacklist.  The fact is, we don't know how they know.  Additionally, demonofelru isn't asserting that because a key was blacklisted for him in a particular case it will be blacklisted for you in your case.  Rather, he's claiming that there exists a risk to your customers that the keys they buy could be blacklisted.  That claim strikes me as just obviously true, and I don't see how you can reasonably deny it.
ataranlen
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May 04, 2011, 07:45:30 PM
 #27

You have to realize that Microsoft doesn't need proof to revoke a license of their software. They could probably revoke ANY license just because you had no shoes on today. lol

Just give in and place a disclaimer saying something like "I take no responsibility if your license key gets revoked"

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TehJoker
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May 04, 2011, 07:59:57 PM
 #28

You're working under the assumption that because something hasn't happened in your particular case it won't happen in other cases.  Your also assuming that multiple activations of the same key from different locations is the only reason Microsoft blacklists and the only way they know whether to blacklist.  The fact is, we don't know how they know.  Additionally, demonofelru isn't asserting that because a key was blacklisted for him in a particular case it will be blacklisted for you in your case.  Rather, he's claiming that there exists a risk to your customers that the keys they buy could be blacklisted.  That claim strikes me as just obviously true, and I don't see how you can reasonably deny it.

the reason why i "deny" it, is simply because he's the first and only person i hear of that ever got a windows key blacklisted, and i do know some people who make money by selling one and the same key to a lot of people and never having problems with their key being blacklisted and/or their account being shut down.

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demonofelru
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May 04, 2011, 08:23:59 PM
 #29

You're working under the assumption that because something hasn't happened in your particular case it won't happen in other cases.  Your also assuming that multiple activations of the same key from different locations is the only reason Microsoft blacklists and the only way they know whether to blacklist.  The fact is, we don't know how they know.  Additionally, demonofelru isn't asserting that because a key was blacklisted for him in a particular case it will be blacklisted for you in your case.  Rather, he's claiming that there exists a risk to your customers that the keys they buy could be blacklisted.  That claim strikes me as just obviously true, and I don't see how you can reasonably deny it.

the reason why i "deny" it, is simply because he's the first and only person i hear of that ever got a windows key blacklisted, and i do know some people who make money by selling one and the same key to a lot of people and never having problems with their key being blacklisted and/or their account being shut down.

Listen I'm not going to argue it anymore I was only going to post the original message telling users be careful, until gamekingx said that MSDN/technet keys won't get black listed then I felt the need to prove him wrong because he was 100% wrong.  proudhon posted a thread of which there are many stating that MS does blacklist MSDN/technet keys I am most definitely not the only one this has happened to.  I have absolutely no reason to lie I have no competing service against you, don't know you outside these forums, and this was the first time I responded to anything in these forums by you or gamekingx;  I even commented earlier that it might be worth the risk.  You do have something to gain by downplaying the possible risk of buying from you which is lost sales.   I wish you luck in this even if I don't agree with you, if people still buy from you it's their own fault I've made it quite clear there's a risk involved.  I won't bother you anymore and sorry it wasn't my intention to affect you, or your sales negatively, just wish you would be more forthcoming.

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proudhon
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May 04, 2011, 08:35:41 PM
 #30

You're working under the assumption that because something hasn't happened in your particular case it won't happen in other cases.  Your also assuming that multiple activations of the same key from different locations is the only reason Microsoft blacklists and the only way they know whether to blacklist.  The fact is, we don't know how they know.  Additionally, demonofelru isn't asserting that because a key was blacklisted for him in a particular case it will be blacklisted for you in your case.  Rather, he's claiming that there exists a risk to your customers that the keys they buy could be blacklisted.  That claim strikes me as just obviously true, and I don't see how you can reasonably deny it.

the reason why i "deny" it, is simply because he's the first and only person i hear of that ever got a windows key blacklisted, and i do know some people who make money by selling one and the same key to a lot of people and never having problems with their key being blacklisted and/or their account being shut down.

Look, here are the facts.  Microsoft can blacklist those keys if they want to.  Your act of selling them is a violation of the TOS you agreed to when you became a TechNet/MSDN subscriber.  If they find out about it somehow, and we don't know all the ways that they can (posting about it on a public forum probably doesn't help you), they can blacklist those keys and terminate your TechNet/MSDN subscription.  Why? Again, because that's what you agreed to when you got a Technet/MSDN account.  Because you are violating the TOS between you and Microsoft, and because they can blacklist and terminate your account because of such violation, there exists some risk to your customers.  You simply cannot guarantee that there is no risk.  Maybe it'll never happen.  But, that fact, that it never happens (if it should be a fact), does not entail that there is or was never any risk to your customers.

Maybe things will turn out fine for you, and, as demonofelru said, maybe the risk is worth it to you and your customers, but there still exists a certain measure of risk.
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May 04, 2011, 09:39:36 PM
 #31

Hello demonofelru, thanks for your concern about if it's a scam or not, but these keys are not technet keys
These keys are all MSDN keys

So here is the problem....

Your customer buys a key and tries to use it 6 times.  Now ALL of your keys that you sold to all of these people all die.  You can not control the customer. 

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