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Author Topic: Using a 220V wash machine outlet for power.....  (Read 9788 times)
d3m0n1q_733rz
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April 02, 2012, 04:53:40 PM
 #41

All this talk about capacitive loads, current draw and the like really has me glad that I use a PFC on my house.   Grin

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DeathAndTaxes
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April 02, 2012, 04:55:33 PM
 #42

All this talk about capacitive loads, current draw and the like really has me glad that I use a PFC on my house.   Grin

Please tell me you are kidding.  Whole house PFC are snake oil in a box.  Completely worthless.

Low power power factor increases phantom load observed by power company (and their cost) but power meters measure watts not volt amps so low powerfactor has no cost to residential users.  High demand industrial consumers are penalized for having a poor PF but residences are not.  PF isn't even calculated for residential users.  If you wanted to you could intentionally reduce your PF to stick it to the power company (same amount of work at same amount of cost to you and higher cost to power company).
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April 02, 2012, 05:06:44 PM
 #43

All this talk about capacitive loads, current draw and the like really has me glad that I use a PFC on my house.   Grin

Please tell me you are kidding.  Whole house PFC are snake oil in a box.  Completely worthless.

Power power factor increases phantom load observed by power company but power meters measure watts not volt amps.  High usage industrial consumers are penalized for having a poor PF but residences are not.

What are you talking about? I installed one of these in my car along with a 200MPG carb and a rare-earth magnet super-generator, and now I can drive anywhere I want without using gas AND power my rig at the same time. they're great.


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April 02, 2012, 08:16:36 PM
 #44

All this talk about capacitive loads, current draw and the like really has me glad that I use a PFC on my house.   Grin

Please tell me you are kidding.  Whole house PFC are snake oil in a box.  Completely worthless.

Low power power factor increases phantom load observed by power company (and their cost) but power meters measure watts not volt amps so low powerfactor has no cost to residential users.  High demand industrial consumers are penalized for having a poor PF but residences are not.  PF isn't even calculated for residential users.  If you wanted to you could intentionally reduce your PF to stick it to the power company (same amount of work at same amount of cost to you and higher cost to power company).

Correct.  The device saves the power company money, not you.  Because some meters show the savings, demonstrations are shown using those meters to convince people to buy.   

http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/power_121509.cfm

There is only one SLIGHT grain of truth to them.... they may make very old motors slightly more efficient and run cooler.  But if your fridge or AC was built in the last 20 years it is probably not one of them. 

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April 07, 2012, 11:24:01 PM
 #45

To the OP, if you've got a 220V outlet you can look at some datacenter level distribution boards (like the APC 0U PDU system) retailed in countries where 220-240 is native (ie. Australia). That'd get you multiple outlets, hang your dryer off one of them, retrofit your computer PSU with a bunch of Australian ones and the chances are you'll be able to run your rig and the dryer fairly easily (remembering that 110V 100W's is gonna be like 50W for 220V).

Just my 2c, good luck!

Stu
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Gerald Davis


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April 07, 2012, 11:25:43 PM
 #46

To the OP, if you've got a 220V outlet you can look at some datacenter level distribution boards (like the APC 0U PDU system) retailed in countries where 220-240 is native (ie. Australia). That'd get you multiple outlets, hang your dryer off one of them, retrofit your computer PSU with a bunch of Australian ones and the chances are you'll be able to run your rig and the dryer fairly easily (remembering that 110V 100W's is gonna be like 50W for 220V).

Just my 2c, good luck!

Stu

Magically there was absolutely nothing correct about that post.
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April 07, 2012, 11:27:17 PM
 #47

To the OP, if you've got a 220V outlet you can look at some datacenter level distribution boards (like the APC 0U PDU system) retailed in countries where 220-240 is native (ie. Australia). That'd get you multiple outlets, hang your dryer off one of them, retrofit your computer PSU with a bunch of Australian ones and the chances are you'll be able to run your rig and the dryer fairly easily (remembering that 110V 100W's is gonna be like 50W for 220V).

Just my 2c, good luck!

Stu

Magically there was absolutely nothing correct about that post.

How so?
DeathAndTaxes
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Gerald Davis


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April 07, 2012, 11:29:42 PM
 #48

1) Outlets of a PDU have insufficient wattage to run a dryer.  
2) US dryers require both 120V & 240V which no PDU outlet supplies
3) Plugging dryer into a PDU (even if possible) doesn't eliminate the issue of unsufficient wattage on the circuit
4) There is no need to change the PSU as virtually all PSU work on 100V to 250V.
5) Changing voltage doesn't change the wattage.  100W on 110V is 100W or 240V or 208V or 220V.

Or you could just read the thread.


Like I said you managed to get every single thing wrong which is kinda amazing.
perlboy
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April 08, 2012, 12:34:16 AM
 #49

1) Outlets of a PDU have insufficient wattage to run a dryer.  

So the dryer is going to use more than 15 amps? Cause that's what one type of these PDUs will deliver.

Quote
2) US dryers require both 120V & 240V which no PDU outlet supplies

I didn't know that.

Quote
3) Plugging dryer into a PDU (even if possible) doesn't eliminate the issue of unsufficient wattage on the circuit

See 1.

Quote
4) There is no need to change the PSU as virtually all PSU work on 100V to 250V.

True true.

Quote
5) Changing voltage doesn't change the wattage.  100W on 110V is 100W or 240V or 208V or 220V.
Or you could just read the thread.

Me thinks perhaps I should. Smiley

Quote
Like I said you managed to get every single thing wrong which is kinda amazing.

I'll blame early mornings for now and return to a topic I know more about.

Stu
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April 08, 2012, 12:46:57 AM
 #50

1) Outlets of a PDU have insufficient wattage to run a dryer.  

So the dryer is going to use more than 15 amps? Cause that's what one type of these PDUs will deliver.

Quote
3) Plugging dryer into a PDU (even if possible) doesn't eliminate the issue of unsufficient wattage on the circuit

See 1.

The dryer could very well use more than 15 amps. Most do. Even then, it doesn't matter how many 15A circuits the PDU has, the breaker is likely 30A. If you're pulling 20A from the dryer you won't be able to draw 15A from the rig, regardless of what the PDU says. Dryer circuits are wired to supply a dryer and that's it. They're not really intended to be shared.
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