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Author Topic: Who are domestic abusers?  (Read 768 times)
sana8410
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September 18, 2014, 02:12:59 PM
 #1

Often they are people you would least expect.  Like a federal district court judge, who routinely imprisons people for non violent crime. 


http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2014/08/hes_beating_on_me_wife_of_judg.html
http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2014/08/birmingham_attorney_donald_wat.html

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama – U.S. District Court Judge Mark Fuller, of Montgomery, today accepted a plea deal that will have last month's arrest for beating his wife at an Atlanta hotel expunged if he completes a counseling program, the judge's lawyer said this morning.

Fuller, who serves Alabama's federal middle district, was arrested Aug. 9 after his wife reported to police that her husband was drunk when he beat her while they were at an Atlanta hotel. She had accused him of having an extra-marital affair with his law clerk.

When Fuller appeared in at an Atlanta Magistrate Court hearing this morning he accepted a plea deal for pre-trial diversion offered by the solicitor, said Fuller's attorney Barry Ragsdale. The plea deal was approved by the judge and with the consent of Fuller's wife, he said. 

Under the deal, Fuller has to have a drug and alcohol evaluation, Ragsdale said. Fuller has already had one performed by a private counseling service and Ragsdale said he hopes the judge will accept that report. If not, Fuller will undergo an evaluation by a counseling service approved by the court, he said.

"He doesn't have a drug or alcohol problem and never has," Ragsdale said.

Fuller also will have to undergo a once a week family and domestic violence program for 24 weeks, Ragsdale said. The judge can undergo that counseling at a court-approved counseling service in Alabama, he said.

Once he completes those requirements there will be no charges and the record will be expunged under the deal, Ragsdale said. "It will essentially put him back with a clean record," he said.

Ragsdale provided a statement from Fuller following the hearing.

"I reached this difficult decision after consulting with my family, and deciding that it was in everyone's best interests to put this incident behind us," Fuller stated. "While I regret that my decision means that the full and complete facts regarding this incident will likely not come out, I have no doubt that it is what is best for all involved."

"This incident has been very embarrassing to me, my family, friends and the court. I deeply regret this incident and look forward to working to resolve these difficulties with my family, where they should be resolved," Fuller stated.

"As difficult as this situation is, I hope that you can respect the need to let my family heal as we move forward with addressing our private and personal family issues. I look forward to completing the family counseling that I voluntarily began several weeks ago and to successfully completing the requirements of the diversion.  I also look forward to addressing the concerns of the Court and hopefully returning to full, active status in the Middle District of Alabama."

At least a few people have argued that Fuller shouldn't return to the bench.

Also see:
MARK FULLER CASE

    How would Judge Fuller judge Judge Fuller? If like Siegelman, harshly: opinion
    Judge Mark Fuller should 'do the right thing' and resign, Rep. Terri Sewell says
    Rep. Martha Roby on Mark Fuller: 'This is a very serious matter ... domestic abuse cannot be tolerated'
    Superstar Ray Rice cut from team; will 'superstar' judge Mark Fuller get to play on?
    Federal judge Mark Fuller accepts plea deal in domestic violence case; could have arrest record expunged

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September 19, 2014, 03:36:29 PM
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Unfortunately I know only too well that domestic abuse knows no social or economic boundaries.  There once was a man who was well educated, a highly decorated WWII pilot and senior Air Corps officer, then an American Military representative on the United Nation team that administered the Free Territory of Trieste from 1947 until 1954.  And ultimately became the President and CEO of a multi-million dollar international business.  He was also a respected community leader and a seemingly devout communing member of the Catholic Church.  Yet behind the facade was a far more sinister individual who consistently subjected his wife and his children to the worst kinds of physical and verbal abuse.   So, no it is not just the poor, or the uneducated, or members a given race or social class, much less of a certain religion or political party who are guilty of abuse. And consequently when I read about this case, the fact that the man is either a Republican or Democrat does not enter my mind.  That is irrelevant. What is relevant is the fact that we have yet another case of physical domestic abuse perpetrated by a successful professional individual.  And until we come to terms with how to identify and adequately deal with the problem, domestic abuse, be it physical, sexual, or verbal will continue to plague society.

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September 20, 2014, 05:24:06 AM
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I find this very ironic (although the article did not mention anything about his tendency of jailing people for non-violent crimes). I do think that domestic abuse can come from anyone. I never have truly understood the reason why people hit (abuse) their significant other/spouse

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September 20, 2014, 08:03:28 AM
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I find this very ironic (although the article did not mention anything about his tendency of jailing people for non-violent crimes). I do think that domestic abuse can come from anyone. I never have truly understood the reason why people hit (abuse) their significant other/spouse

It's amazing how many times professionals and even scientists are having to be brought in to state the obvious because people refuse to believe what's right in front of them, I'm probably going to end up starting a flame war by commenting this because I am rabidly anti-domestic abuse against all kinds. The reason people do this is because they have had it taught to them through violence and fear of violence and they repeat the process on the very people they claim to care about. You can see this in the way they desperately try to justify this kind of action towards their children and their spouses, no violence is okay it doesn't matter how you try to paint it and you can see them trying to struggle between what they were taught and what actually happened to them when reality is they were just being made to believe what they believe by being beaten up.

There's also the fact that a lot of this kind of thing is in their religious doctrine, in quite a few religions as a matter of fact, so you have entire generations who are having it beaten into them ( Quite literally in a lot of cases ) that they need to go around beating people up in order to enforce obedience. Also, no I don't consider it a form of teaching respect at all, this is an obey or die mantra that people follow, respect is supposed to be mutual and if you're going around beating the crap out of a child or a wife in order to make someone do what you say even if it's stupid or wrong that's hardly respect is it?

You torture anyone long enough and they will believe anything you want or confess to anything you want because they're scared of being hurt, domestic abuse is just another form of torture, it doesn't matter if you 'lighten' it over a period of time it still has the same kind of damaging psychological affect because it's still physical abuse.
Fabrizio89
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September 20, 2014, 04:32:31 PM
 #5

When talking about domestic abuses we always hear about men hitting their wives, but let's not forget it's the other way around too, maybe not phisically in the most cases. I have heard many times of women destroying psychologically their men because they cannot give them the quality of life they'd like to have. And there are many mothers abusing of their children daily too. Every pressure they receive from the world, they throw on their son/daughter.

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September 20, 2014, 05:22:41 PM
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Thankfully people are slowly beginning to acknowledge that kind of thing can happen now, everything is still incredibly biased against men though, as people often say on the internet, when a female gets raped or abused, it makes national headlines, when it happens to a man? It barely gets reported on.
leannemckim46
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September 20, 2014, 11:52:57 PM
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I find this very ironic (although the article did not mention anything about his tendency of jailing people for non-violent crimes). I do think that domestic abuse can come from anyone. I never have truly understood the reason why people hit (abuse) their significant other/spouse

It's amazing how many times professionals and even scientists are having to be brought in to state the obvious because people refuse to believe what's right in front of them, I'm probably going to end up starting a flame war by commenting this because I am rabidly anti-domestic abuse against all kinds. The reason people do this is because they have had it taught to them through violence and fear of violence and they repeat the process on the very people they claim to care about. You can see this in the way they desperately try to justify this kind of action towards their children and their spouses, no violence is okay it doesn't matter how you try to paint it and you can see them trying to struggle between what they were taught and what actually happened to them when reality is they were just being made to believe what they believe by being beaten up.

There's also the fact that a lot of this kind of thing is in their religious doctrine, in quite a few religions as a matter of fact, so you have entire generations who are having it beaten into them ( Quite literally in a lot of cases ) that they need to go around beating people up in order to enforce obedience. Also, no I don't consider it a form of teaching respect at all, this is an obey or die mantra that people follow, respect is supposed to be mutual and if you're going around beating the crap out of a child or a wife in order to make someone do what you say even if it's stupid or wrong that's hardly respect is it?

You torture anyone long enough and they will believe anything you want or confess to anything you want because they're scared of being hurt, domestic abuse is just another form of torture, it doesn't matter if you 'lighten' it over a period of time it still has the same kind of damaging psychological affect because it's still physical abuse.
This is very similar to the "Stockholm syndrome" with hostages who are held hostage for extended periods of time.

EDIT: Stockholm syndrome is when a hostage forms a bond with the captor after they have been a hostage for a certain amount of time (for those that do not know)

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