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Author Topic: IEEE Spectrum report on the future of money  (Read 2649 times)
shtylman
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May 31, 2012, 05:16:51 AM
 #1

http://spectrum.ieee.org/static/future-of-money
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May 31, 2012, 05:32:37 AM
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Relatedly, this is the coolest bitcoin infographic I've seen:

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May 31, 2012, 06:17:03 AM
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Seems decent, except for the "public key cryptography 101" box: analogy with a pair of keys is confusing and wrong. My favorite explanation is the one I stumbled upon on this forum (not sure if Netrin came up with it or he adopted it) -


Yeah. Here's a magical analogy for public key cryptography: I generate a private key and numerous public unlocked treasure chests. I give these open treasure chests to all of my friends (it's easy to copy them). Whenever a friend wants to send me a message, they just put the message in my public treasure chest and close the lid. Now even they can not open it again. Only I, with my unique private key, can open the chest.

After I generated the public keys, I don't really need them any more, unless I want to send messages to myself. But no one needs the private key to lock a message. The private key is only required to open a message.


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May 31, 2012, 06:22:48 AM
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I really like this as well. Look forward to infographics like these and more in the Bitcoin Magazine in the future. We were a bit too busy last month to include more than 2 into the first issue. I agree with our marketing lead Mihai Alisie that they are crucial for bringing new blood.

Seems decent, except for the "public key cryptography 101" box: analogy with a pair of keys is confusing and wrong. My favorite explanation is the one I stumbled upon on this forum (not sure if Netrin came up with it or he adopted it) -


Yeah. Here's a magical analogy for public key cryptography: I generate a private key and numerous public unlocked treasure chests. I give these open treasure chests to all of my friends (it's easy to copy them). Whenever a friend wants to send me a message, they just put the message in my public treasure chest and close the lid. Now even they can not open it again. Only I, with my unique private key, can open the chest.

After I generated the public keys, I don't really need them any more, unless I want to send messages to myself. But no one needs the private key to lock a message. The private key is only required to open a message.


Love it.

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May 31, 2012, 06:32:05 AM
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I really like this as well. Look forward to infographics like these and more in the Bitcoin Magazine in the future. We were a bit too busy last month to include more than 2 into the first issue. I agree with our marketing lead Mihai Alisie that they are crucial for bringing new blood.

Seems decent, except for the "public key cryptography 101" box: analogy with a pair of keys is confusing and wrong. My favorite explanation is the one I stumbled upon on this forum (not sure if Netrin came up with it or he adopted it) -


Yeah. Here's a magical analogy for public key cryptography: I generate a private key and numerous public unlocked treasure chests. I give these open treasure chests to all of my friends (it's easy to copy them). Whenever a friend wants to send me a message, they just put the message in my public treasure chest and close the lid. Now even they can not open it again. Only I, with my unique private key, can open the chest.

After I generated the public keys, I don't really need them any more, unless I want to send messages to myself. But no one needs the private key to lock a message. The private key is only required to open a message.


Love it.

My guess is that Post #3 will be addressed and Matthew will have this as the centerfold in some upcoming issue of Bitcoin Magazine.

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May 31, 2012, 06:55:38 AM
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I used to love reading Spectrum when I was a young EE/CS student. I also like the graphic.

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May 31, 2012, 01:18:18 PM
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Awesome graphic.

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May 31, 2012, 01:20:50 PM
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I'd like to know what Glenn exactly wears

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May 31, 2012, 01:20:58 PM
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Seems decent, except for the "public key cryptography 101" box: analogy with a pair of keys is confusing and wrong. My favorite explanation is the one I stumbled upon on this forum (not sure if Netrin came up with it or he adopted it) -


Yeah. Here's a magical analogy for public key cryptography: I generate a private key and numerous public unlocked treasure chests. I give these open treasure chests to all of my friends (it's easy to copy them). Whenever a friend wants to send me a message, they just put the message in my public treasure chest and close the lid. Now even they can not open it again. Only I, with my unique private key, can open the chest.

After I generated the public keys, I don't really need them any more, unless I want to send messages to myself. But no one needs the private key to lock a message. The private key is only required to open a message.

I don't see anything that is technically incorrect about the PKI explanation in the graphic. Do you care to explain what is wrong with it? netrin's quote is cool for the noobs, but it doesn't mean that what is in the graphic is incorrect at all. Both quotes are very correct and explained differently.

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May 31, 2012, 02:10:56 PM
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Seems decent, except for the "public key cryptography 101" box: analogy with a pair of keys is confusing and wrong. My favorite explanation is the one I stumbled upon on this forum (not sure if Netrin came up with it or he adopted it) -


Yeah. Here's a magical analogy for public key cryptography: I generate a private key and numerous public unlocked treasure chests. I give these open treasure chests to all of my friends (it's easy to copy them). Whenever a friend wants to send me a message, they just put the message in my public treasure chest and close the lid. Now even they can not open it again. Only I, with my unique private key, can open the chest.

After I generated the public keys, I don't really need them any more, unless I want to send messages to myself. But no one needs the private key to lock a message. The private key is only required to open a message.

I don't see anything that is technically incorrect about the PKI explanation in the graphic. Do you care to explain what is wrong with it? netrin's quote is cool for the noobs, but it doesn't mean that what is in the graphic is incorrect at all. Both quotes are very correct and explained differently.

It's also not really relevant, as it describes public-key encryption (which isn't used in bitcoin) instead of signing.

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May 31, 2012, 02:14:45 PM
 #11

It's also not really relevant, as it describes public-key encryption (which isn't used in bitcoin) instead of signing.
OK I can see the confusion then.

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Stephen Gornick
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November 26, 2012, 08:15:22 PM
 #12

Sorry for the necrothread, but the source article doesn't appear to show the story on Bitcoin specifically, [Edited] which contained the graphic:

 - http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/bitcoin-the-cryptoanarchists-answer-to-cash/0

and the images above weren't the full resolution:



 - http://i.imgur.com/JfuOo.jpg   <-- To see 1871 X 1420 resolution

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