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Author Topic: Will answer any question about physics/math for BTC tips  (Read 2003 times)
deepceleron
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June 13, 2012, 07:25:50 AM
 #21

Thanks... One thing that's always bugged me: why does the gravity equation use radius squared when electric field calculations use radius cubed?  I was taught the cubed was because it spread out in three dimensions, but doesn't gravity also spread though 3 dimensions?

1. to keep this universe in balance so all matter doesn't collapse into nothingness like all the other universes,
2. because gravity is really the bending of space-time and not a force,
3. because you need some easy force math before we make you learn the quantum chromodynamics Lagrangian,
4. thee flying spaghetti monster designed it that way so that pasta-like strings of matter join together in meatball-shaped clumps in her noodly image.

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RoloTonyBrownTown
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June 13, 2012, 07:28:14 AM
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Physics grad from top 5 US university, will answer any college level physics/engineering/math/chemistry question that I can.

There's gotta be a few of you who are not done with exams yet!

If you can tell me if the Higgs Boson exists I'll pay you Wink

deepceleron
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June 13, 2012, 07:33:26 AM
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Physics grad from top 5 US university, will answer any college level physics/engineering/math/chemistry question that I can.

There's gotta be a few of you who are not done with exams yet!

If you can tell me if the Higgs Boson exists I'll pay you Wink

If I tell you what energy levels it doesn't exist at, you can tell me what Bitcoin amounts you won't pay?

totaleclipseofthebank
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June 13, 2012, 09:18:43 AM
 #24

Thanks... One thing that's always bugged me: why does the gravity equation use radius squared when electric field calculations use radius cubed?  I was taught the cubed was because it spread out in three dimensions, but doesn't gravity also spread though 3 dimensions?

1. to keep this universe in balance so all matter doesn't collapse into nothingness like all the other universes,
2. because gravity is really the bending of space-time and not a force,
3. because you need some easy force math before we make you learn the quantum chromodynamics Lagrangian,
4. thee flying spaghetti monster designed it that way so that pasta-like strings of matter join together in meatball-shaped clumps in her noodly image.

Electrodynamic force also scales with 1/r2, and it is due to exactly the same effect (spreading out into 3 dimensions) as with gravity. I.e. the total force exerted on a shell around the central potential is the same, regardless of how big that shell is (since the area of a shell is proportional to r^2).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb's_law
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_law_of_universal_gravitation


totaleclipseofthebank
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June 13, 2012, 09:31:09 AM
 #25

Physics grad from top 5 US university, will answer any college level physics/engineering/math/chemistry question that I can.

There's gotta be a few of you who are not done with exams yet!

If you can tell me if the Higgs Boson exists I'll pay you Wink

And no, I'm can't tell you whether or not it exists.

The Higgs boson is the only particle that is part of the "standard model" of particle physics that has never been observed experimentally. This is because its interactions with particles we can observe easily are extremely rare and difficult to measure. One of the goals of the LHC is to confirm its existence experimentally, but many physicists believe it will not achieve its goal (as is alluded to in deepceleron's chart)

The chart shows sigma/sigmaSM, which (I think) is essentially a ratio of the likelihood of that particle existing with the mass (in eV, a unit of mass or energy) on the x-axis. The LHC and Tevatron experiments have excluded the possibility of the Higgs existing with certain ranges of mass, but there is still a window where it could exist. At higher masses, (which are out of the range the LHC can observe), the Higgs could still exist, even if the window area turns out to be excluded as well. Deepceleron, please correct me if I'm wrong about this.
deepceleron
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June 13, 2012, 11:50:51 AM
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The mass of Higgs is unpredicted, so the Large Hadron Collider (not an "atom smasher", or even a "nucleus smasher") continuously collides a stream of protons together at different energy levels in hopes that the constituent quarks + energy will combine into statistical detection above the background noise that would indicate with a confidence level that one can say a Higgs boson is produced at a particular energy collision indicating its mass. It's like throwing a bowling ball in the air to detect the mass of a mosquito in a swarm of bees, or confirm that mosquitoes don't exist (well, actually, it's nothing like that). All the shaded regions are mass ranges that confidently have been eliminated by colliders, leaving the 115-140 GeV/c2 range where there is still little confidence of a result either way.

Ask a physicist why one should exist, he'd probably give you a long list of physics and calculus prerequisites before you can understand the particle physics course.

totaleclipseofthebank
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June 13, 2012, 11:02:20 PM
 #27

Decided on some rate guidelines:

High-school level:
0.2btc/question
2.0btc/hour for homework help

College level:
0.3btc/question
3.0btc/hour for homework help

please PM me for donation address
faster service with tips upfront!
notme
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June 14, 2012, 02:39:01 AM
 #28

Thanks... One thing that's always bugged me: why does the gravity equation use radius squared when electric field calculations use radius cubed?  I was taught the cubed was because it spread out in three dimensions, but doesn't gravity also spread though 3 dimensions?

1. to keep this universe in balance so all matter doesn't collapse into nothingness like all the other universes,
2. because gravity is really the bending of space-time and not a force,
3. because you need some easy force math before we make you learn the quantum chromodynamics Lagrangian,
4. thee flying spaghetti monster designed it that way so that pasta-like strings of matter join together in meatball-shaped clumps in her noodly image.

Electrodynamic force also scales with 1/r2, and it is due to exactly the same effect (spreading out into 3 dimensions) as with gravity. I.e. the total force exerted on a shell around the central potential is the same, regardless of how big that shell is (since the area of a shell is proportional to r^2).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb's_law
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_law_of_universal_gravitation




Well look at that... I wonder where I got that r^3 at?

https://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
While no idea is perfect, some ideas are useful.
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RoloTonyBrownTown
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June 15, 2012, 03:14:39 AM
 #29


And no, I'm can't tell you whether or not it exists.


I know, I was just being a smartass Wink

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