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Author Topic: Is mining with low power 1155 Celeron Efficient?  (Read 2401 times)
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July 09, 2012, 08:21:13 AM
 #1

Compared to a dual core G530, a G440, G460 or G530T uses less power.

Would it be fast enough to support a dual GPU rig maximizing the MHash for two 5870's for example, or would the MHash be cpu limited?

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July 09, 2012, 08:32:08 AM
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Yes it be fine.
I've seen people mining with rigs that use everything from Smart Routers, to intel atoms to RaspberyPi (?) devices.
Aslong as it can actually run the software required, it will be fine, the power of the processor won't slow down the hash rate of your GPU's.

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July 09, 2012, 09:00:39 AM
 #3

Thanks. in the same token I assume the amount of ram doesn't matter starting at 1GB? or 2GB minimum any more doesn't matter? (winxp or win7)

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July 09, 2012, 09:08:55 AM
 #4

1GB RAM should be OK. Mining doesn't consume much RAM.

Busy ATM.
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July 10, 2012, 03:20:00 AM
 #5

I found the G460 has EIST speed step technology and TDP is 35W compared to G530 65W


I can't find any power consumption comparisons for these at Idle

Celeron G530    2 cores

 2.4 GHz    2 × 256 KB    2 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    850–1000 MHz    
65 W
   LGA 1155    


Celeron G460    1 core, but Hyperthreading

   1.8 GHz       1 × 256 KB    1.5 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    650–1000 MHz    
35 W
   LGA 1155

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July 10, 2012, 03:41:52 AM
 #6

I found the G460 has EIST speed step technology and TDP is 35W compared to G530 65W


I can't find any power consumption comparisons for these at Idle

Celeron G530    2 cores

 2.4 GHz    2 × 256 KB    2 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    850–1000 MHz    
65 W
   LGA 1155    


Celeron G460    1 core, but Hyperthreading

   1.8 GHz       1 × 256 KB    1.5 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    650–1000 MHz    
35 W
   LGA 1155

Read from here down: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=88881.msg1018722#msg1018722

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July 10, 2012, 03:45:06 AM
 #7

I found the G460 has EIST speed step technology and TDP is 35W compared to G530 65W


I can't find any power consumption comparisons for these at Idle

Celeron G530    2 cores

 2.4 GHz    2 × 256 KB    2 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    850–1000 MHz    
65 W
   LGA 1155    


Celeron G460    1 core, but Hyperthreading

   1.8 GHz       1 × 256 KB    1.5 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    650–1000 MHz    
35 W
   LGA 1155

Read from here down: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=88881.msg1018722#msg1018722

Not helpful and I was in that discussion as well.

I think I'm seeing if I'd save 2 watts or 6 watts. If its 6 watts i may wan the single core

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July 10, 2012, 03:48:39 AM
 #8

I found the G460 has EIST speed step technology and TDP is 35W compared to G530 65W


I can't find any power consumption comparisons for these at Idle

Celeron G530    2 cores

 2.4 GHz    2 × 256 KB    2 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    850–1000 MHz    
65 W
   LGA 1155    


Celeron G460    1 core, but Hyperthreading

   1.8 GHz       1 × 256 KB    1.5 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    650–1000 MHz    
35 W
   LGA 1155

Read from here down: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=88881.msg1018722#msg1018722

Not helpful and I was in that discussion as well.

I think I'm seeing if I'd save 2 watts or 6 watts. If its 6 watts i may wan the single core

Haha I realized that after I posted.

Why are you worrying over a matter of 6W at idle? Just get whatever's cheapest.

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July 10, 2012, 03:51:11 AM
 #9

I found the G460 has EIST speed step technology and TDP is 35W compared to G530 65W


I can't find any power consumption comparisons for these at Idle

Celeron G530    2 cores

 2.4 GHz    2 × 256 KB    2 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    850–1000 MHz    
65 W
   LGA 1155    


Celeron G460    1 core, but Hyperthreading

   1.8 GHz       1 × 256 KB    1.5 MB    HD Graphics (6 EUs)    650–1000 MHz    
35 W
   LGA 1155

Read from here down: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=88881.msg1018722#msg1018722

Not helpful and I was in that discussion as well.

I think I'm seeing if I'd save 2 watts or 6 watts. If its 6 watts i may wan the single core

Haha I realized that after I posted.

Why are you worrying over a matter of 6W at idle? Just get whatever's cheapest.

a solar panel that may be the difference of not having to buy the bigger panel

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July 10, 2012, 04:02:49 AM
 #10

Just go ahead and get the single core. Lower clocks all around (including the ondie gpu), less cache, and again single core. Ease up on the multiplier, drop the voltage, enable all power saving and you got yourself a 2 watt CPU Smiley. If you're comparing AMD to Intel, the difference from the slowest current gen AMD CPU and slowest current gen Intel CPU is likely negligible.

FWIW, with all power saving features enabled on a heavily overclocked i7-3930K (4784Mhz @ 1.410v) while nearly fully idle, the sensor claims to pull 25 watts across the entire package.

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July 10, 2012, 09:33:34 AM
 #11

If you are concerned about it's power usage, because you serious about using it with a solar panel, the RaspberryPi runs of 5v usb using at very most 3.5 Watts I think. It's not expensive either at $35 for the one ideal for most people. Just add an inexpensive SD card and you almost done.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

This makes it viable for small portable solar panels, that often come with battery backup and can output 4-8W without an issue, during the day of course. There is many USB based solar panel phone/laptop chargers on the market which can easily handle the requirements of the about 2-3W this will need, since that is all it would need.

It certainly be more efficient than running something that will happily consume around 15W under light usage (most celerons). This will end up making a small solar charger setup more expensive than it needs to be, without actually providing anymore usefulness to it. I wish I had found it before I opted for the Intel Atom.
While the processor might not be doing much, it is still doing something, so you can't use the idle figures as something to expect 24/7.

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July 10, 2012, 09:36:37 AM
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If you are concerned about it's power usage, because you serious about using it with a solar panel, the RaspberryPi runs of 5v usb using at very most 3.5 Watts I think. It's not expensive either at $35 for the one ideal for most people. Just add an inexpensive SD card and you almost done.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

This makes it viable for small portable solar panels, that often come with battery backup and can output 4-8W without an issue, during the day of course. There is many USB based solar panel phone/laptop chargers on the market which can easily handle the requirements of the about 2-3W this will need, since that is all it would need.

It certainly be more efficient than running something that will happily consume around 15W under light usage (most celerons). This will end up making a small solar charger setup more expensive than it needs to be, without actually providing anymore usefulness to it. I wish I had found it before I opted for the Intel Atom.
While the processor might not be doing much, it is still doing something, so you can't use the idle figures as something to expect 24/7.

Wow. what is the hash rate for it?

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July 10, 2012, 05:58:04 PM
 #13

If you are concerned about it's power usage, because you serious about using it with a solar panel, the RaspberryPi runs of 5v usb using at very most 3.5 Watts I think. It's not expensive either at $35 for the one ideal for most people. Just add an inexpensive SD card and you almost done.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

This makes it viable for small portable solar panels, that often come with battery backup and can output 4-8W without an issue, during the day of course. There is many USB based solar panel phone/laptop chargers on the market which can easily handle the requirements of the about 2-3W this will need, since that is all it would need.

It certainly be more efficient than running something that will happily consume around 15W under light usage (most celerons). This will end up making a small solar charger setup more expensive than it needs to be, without actually providing anymore usefulness to it. I wish I had found it before I opted for the Intel Atom.
While the processor might not be doing much, it is still doing something, so you can't use the idle figures as something to expect 24/7.

Wow. what is the hash rate for it?

Raspberry pi isn't used for hashing. People use FPGAs with it. You cant use a video card with it.

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July 10, 2012, 06:57:43 PM
 #14

If you are concerned about it's power usage, because you serious about using it with a solar panel, the RaspberryPi runs of 5v usb using at very most 3.5 Watts I think. It's not expensive either at $35 for the one ideal for most people. Just add an inexpensive SD card and you almost done.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

This makes it viable for small portable solar panels, that often come with battery backup and can output 4-8W without an issue, during the day of course. There is many USB based solar panel phone/laptop chargers on the market which can easily handle the requirements of the about 2-3W this will need, since that is all it would need.

It certainly be more efficient than running something that will happily consume around 15W under light usage (most celerons). This will end up making a small solar charger setup more expensive than it needs to be, without actually providing anymore usefulness to it. I wish I had found it before I opted for the Intel Atom.
While the processor might not be doing much, it is still doing something, so you can't use the idle figures as something to expect 24/7.

Wow. what is the hash rate for it?

Raspberry pi isn't used for hashing. People use FPGAs with it. You cant use a video card with it.

oh its a mini PC that u connect to FPGA....seems complicated

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July 10, 2012, 09:46:23 PM
 #15

You are planning to solar power a low powered PC, why stop at complicated now?
Tongue

Sorry if I glossed over the fact you wanted to use GPU's with this PC, generally speaking unless you already have a few kilowatt solar panels already on your roof, not many buy them, just to power a PC off them. A small device like the Raspberry PI and a FPGA are atleast reasonable with a solar panel kit and battery backup system, that cost you maybe a £100, instead of £1000 to power a PC.

While it's true the RaspberryPI is just the core components of most PC's. It's not for hashing, just to interface other devices with.
It is the way forward with FPGA's and more custom hardware coming into the market which are all low in power consumption.

It's purpose is to be attached to FPGA's via usb as the most common connection for such devices. Something I had figured would be of interest to an individual wanting to solar panel power a computer.

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July 10, 2012, 10:17:22 PM
 #16

Did someone say Celeron?

Certainly running one core will be more efficient than two, you don't have to drag another core along for the ride. You will get best efficiency by using the Intel Speedstep and making sure it is working by monitoring that the multiplier and voltage is automatically lowering when idle (CPU-Z is a good monitor for this). You may need to pick the laptop or power saver Windows power profile to enable it, along with having speedstep enabled in BIOS. Alternately, manually underclock - you can cut the CPU bus and system memory clocks in half yourself and undervolt the CPU by tweaking in BIOS.

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