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Author Topic: First quantum computer sold  (Read 5212 times)
Ian Maxwell
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May 27, 2011, 03:33:52 AM
 #1

Press release

Q&A with HPCwire

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We’ve sold the world’s first commercial quantum computer to a large global security company, Lockheed Martin. That’s a real milestone for us. We are excited to work with Lockheed and future customers to tackle complex problems traditional methods cannot resolve.

How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin? Are there known quantum algorithms for breaking ECDSA and SHA-2?

Ian Maxwell
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PLATO
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May 27, 2011, 03:43:35 AM
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I am so glad I am living in the future
kjj
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May 27, 2011, 03:52:28 AM
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Maybe.

Not all superconducting ring reduction systems are quantum in nature.

See this IEEE article.  The good stuff is on page 2.

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May 27, 2011, 03:53:45 AM
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How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin? Are there known quantum algorithms for breaking ECDSA and SHA-2?

No.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 27, 2011, 04:04:41 AM
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Even so... How fast can it solve a block?

The wallet is full before you start the client.  Grin

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May 27, 2011, 04:24:21 AM
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Even so... How fast can it solve a block?

First things first, we'll worry about blocks once we get DOOM running.
Ian Maxwell
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May 27, 2011, 07:26:16 AM
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How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin? Are there known quantum algorithms for breaking ECDSA and SHA-2?

No.

I was reassured by your saying this, but after looking into it more I'm not so sure. The difficulty of deriving an ECDSA private key from the public comes from the difficulty of the discrete logarithm problem, and Shor's algorithm reduces that to polynomial time.

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May 27, 2011, 07:47:53 AM
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How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin? Are there known quantum algorithms for breaking ECDSA and SHA-2?

No.

I was reassured by your saying this, but after looking into it more I'm not so sure. The difficulty of deriving an ECDSA private key from the public comes from the difficulty of the discrete logarithm problem, and Shor's algorithm reduces that to polynomial time.
modified shor's algorithm could be used to attack ecc crypto, however not with (only) 8 stable qubits Smiley

However even if that were (likely) to happen bitcoin could just change the cryptosystem(s) to something not vulnerable to quantum computer based attack.
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May 27, 2011, 07:53:06 AM
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If a decent implementation of Shor's algorithm ever shows up, it will be the end of all cryptography, not just bitcoin.  At that point, we will literally be carrying discrete milligrams and micrograms of gold around in our pockets, because nothing else will be trusted.

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May 27, 2011, 09:32:43 AM
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As for Bitcoin just changing cryptosystems to prevent quantum attacks, it seems that the core developers can't even find enough help to fix the bugs and implement needed features. Finding experts to implement even the cryptographic changes that have been suggested in this forum seems unlikely. The bounties are going toward PR and e-commerce, rather than fundamental security projects.
When this becomes a threat I'm sure there will be people who are willing to do it - especially if bitcoin continues to grow the way it's growing.
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May 27, 2011, 09:51:58 AM
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When this becomes a threat I'm sure there will be people who are willing to do it - especially if bitcoin continues to grow the way it's growing.

IF it isn't already a threat, when it becomes one, the establishment isn't going to advertise it, they will just attack and disrupt Bitcoin in a way that the latter can't avoid losing widespread public trust.

Until then, it's clear to me that the best developers will continue to mainly be concerned with the latest improvements to their e-commerce shopping cart... Cheesy

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May 27, 2011, 01:23:49 PM
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How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin? Are there known quantum algorithms for breaking ECDSA and SHA-2?

No.

I was reassured by your saying this, but after looking into it more I'm not so sure. The difficulty of deriving an ECDSA private key from the public comes from the difficulty of the discrete logarithm problem, and Shor's algorithm reduces that to polynomial time.

But it still doesn't completely remove the security, it just makes it easier to brute force crack; but only if you have enough qubits to do it.  Also, Bitcoin is modular, and ECDSA can be swapped out for something more secure against quantum computations.  I'm pretty sure that quantum computers are not a threat to SHA-256 or it's related algorithms.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 27, 2011, 02:57:54 PM
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If a decent implementation of Shor's algorithm ever shows up, it will be the end of all cryptography, not just bitcoin.  At that point, we will literally be carrying discrete milligrams and micrograms of gold around in our pockets, because nothing else will be trusted.
Not true. There are still plenty of encryption algorithms that are not weakened by Shor.

You are right.  I was thinking this morning that it had been many years since I looked into it, so I did some more checking, and found this paper on Quantum Resistant Public Key Cryptography.

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May 27, 2011, 03:01:57 PM
 #14

Good to know.  I assume as long NP!=P, there's something we can use.

Otherwise, we might have to use one-time pads, and only trust humans we've physically met.
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May 27, 2011, 04:04:51 PM
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this scares the shit out of me.. Tongue of course the american 'security' company would buy it...
now they can use it to pick voices out of phone calls, scan thousands of video feeds for people...

crypto is small fry compared to the 'advertised' applications of this computer.
Welcome to the future, please deposite your human rights and privacy at the door.

ZOMG Moo!
Enochian
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May 29, 2011, 05:49:11 AM
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Press release
How does this affect the crypto used in Bitcoin?

There has been considerable skepticism in the theoretical computer science community over whether D-Wave's box even does quantum computing at all.

Most suspect it does at best simulated annealing which would have zero impact on anything.

They recently published a paper in Nature in which they try to suggest there is something quantum going on for 8 entangled bits, which is far less than the 128 qubits they are claiming for the box they are selling.

At this point, there is little to suggest they have anything other than superlative marketing hype.

So it affects Bitcoin not at all.



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May 29, 2011, 06:42:18 AM
 #17

FUD FUD F.U.D.!!!!

sell me your bitcoins @ $2/BTC

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May 29, 2011, 12:29:12 PM
 #18

If you are right, perhaps, it has already happened, and explains why the government eventually allowed things like PGP.

The US tried very hard to suppress PGP.  It was only after it realized that a) there was no putting the genie back in the bottle, and b) the rest of the world was starting to innovate around cryptography that the US finally dropped its restrictions.  Had they continued to try and resist, much of the R&D would have simply left the US (and in fact, I think much did and the damage that the PGP battle did to innovation in the US is still being felt).

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May 29, 2011, 12:48:18 PM
 #19


US govt. shot itself in the foot with PGP crap-fight .... will probably do it again with bitcoin.

What's to say this "quantum computer" is anything other than just another govt. boondoggle for a connected contractor?

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May 30, 2011, 03:01:18 AM
 #20

I'll just leave this here...
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