Bitcoin Forum
November 22, 2017, 01:51:56 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.15.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: There are films. And then there are films.  (Read 8451 times)
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 16, 2012, 03:47:33 AM
 #1

Please discuss and share. Try to do better than just posting a link with no explanation. The point is to discuss.

Try not to provide spoilers. Always assume others have not seen the film you are discussing. If you must, and I firmly object, then be courteous enough to provide a very clear BOLDFACED CAPITAL LETTER warning like this:

SPOILER WARNING about STAR WARS:
Try to make the spoiler have enough verbiage leading into the spoiler itself such that the information is not immediately visible to the eye. Then you can proceed with the relevant information that you really shouldn't be saying, such as Darth Vader is Luke's father. Keep the WARNINGS above and below without extra linefeeds so the spoiler text does not stand out. I'm serious. Spoilers wreck the film watching experience.
END SPOILER.

But there's really no need to provide spoilers. Films can be discussed intelligently in very interesting ways without spoilers. When providing links, try not to create links that would create too much of a spoiler. Trailers sometimes are spoilers themselves, but if it's the official trailer, then that's okay.

53 films to watch right now:

Tokyo Twilight: This is an exceptional film from director Yasujiro Ozu. It will leave you in tears. More info: http://www.criterion.com/films/771-tokyo-twilight

In the Mood for Love: This film is pretty much considered to be Wong Kar-Wai's masterpiece. However, watch his other films as well. In the Mood for Love is actually the second in a very loose trilogy, comprised of Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love, and 2046. More info and trailer for the film: http://www.criterion.com/films/198-in-the-mood-for-love

Let Me In: This film is very underrated. The problem is further compounded by those who watched the Swedish version first, and can't accept the fact that Let Me In is actually an astounding film. Why? It has an extraordinarily beautiful soundtrack, superb acting, beautiful lighting, metaphors within the cinematography and lyrics, and the story is simultaneously tragic and beautiful. A clip from the film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F62GjsKAfNs&feature=relmfu

2001: A Space Odyssey: Maybe you've seen this. But if you haven't seen it properly, then you need to watch it again. It is generally considered the greatest science fiction film ever made, is pretty much considered one of the greatest films ever made (consistently in the top ten - Sight & Sound's Directors Poll rates it at #2), and is generally one of the most discussed films ever, and will continue to be for the next 100 years. Watch every minute of this film with rapt attention. It is simultaneously very slow (sometimes boring), and yet also the most incredible trip anyone will ever go on: I defy you to watch the following clip and tell me it isn't art of the highest form. And remember this film was produced 46 years ago. Yes - 46 years ago, as production began in 1966. A clip from the film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpvOUnz4T7Q

Pale Flower (subtitled): I truly love this film. It's a beautiful example of the Japanese New Wave of the sixties. It's a noir with the deepest blacks and whites that almost seem blue. It's a morality tale (or would that be an immorality tale?). Whatever the case, you should watch it. The original trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOOr4nuWFqU

Hunger: This film will take you to the grave. Fassbender's performance is dedicated, to say the least, and McQueen's direction is fantastic. The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9IiUbBV4zc&feature=relmfu

The Face of Another (subtitled): This is another film from the Japanese New Wave. However, it's also a film from Hiroshi Teshigahara. That means a lot. Please do not consider passing this one by. Tell me, how many films have you watched which belong to the category of avant-garde existentialism? I thought so. This film will stay in your mind. Trust me. The trailer just doesn't do the film justice. The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK5Rz6txcDU

Yi Yi (subtitled): How can I convey what a beautiful film this is? So poignant, powerful, touching, sad, and wonderful. It's long, but worthy of several viewings. The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8F6tSorwYqw

Never Let Me Go: Carey Mulligan and Izzy Meikle-Small's performance are beyond measure. The cinematography is beautiful. The story just stabs you in the heart. The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXiRZhDEo8A

2046 (subtitled): Are you prepared to watch what many consider to be one of the most beautifully filmed movies ever? Until you've watched a Wong Kar-Wai film, you're not yet complete. There are films, and then there are Wong Kar-Wai films. Words to describe his works? Dreamy. Sublime. Swooning. Meditative. Sumptuous. Beautiful. He is the master of love found and lost across the hallway corridor, and his films are a visual and auditory experience that just sings to the soul. The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8OAxS9L7es

Here's an example of Wong Kar-Wai's film grammar (and Zhang Ziyi's incredible performance). In this clip from 2046 (only this scene is in black and white), Zhang's character realizes she's just fallen in love. The clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRfPF3tLIGQ

Mystery Train: I don't know how to describe this one. All I can say is, it provides fond memories after having watched it. The trailer: http://www.criterion.com/films/2057-mystery-train?q=autocomplete

Woman in the Dunes (subtitled): This is pretty much the most famous film from Hiroshi Teshigahara. And it's actually a very famous film, period. It's another film that belongs in the category of avant-garde existentialism. It's a deep probing film about identity, freedom, and life. It will not go away when it's over. More information and a trailer: http://mubi.com/films/woman-in-the-dunes

Inglourious Basterds: This movie has grown on me. On the second and subsequent viewings, I have come to really enjoy this film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/inglourious-basterds

Chungking Express: Wong Kar-Wai banged out this movie because he and his actors needed a break while filming Ashes of Time. Despite the quick production, it's a beautiful and fun movie to watch. Faye Wong, one of the stars in the film, also covers a song by the Cranberries, in Cantonese! More info: http://mubi.com/films/chungking-express

Barry Lyndon: This is a Stanley Kubrick film. He actually used special lenses from NASA to film many of the scenes lit only by candlelight. More info: http://mubi.com/films/barry-lyndon

An Education: Carey Mulligan shines in this modern film about a student in 1960's London coming of age. More info: http://mubi.com/films/an-education

Three Colors: Blue: Juliet Binoche stars in this in this beautiful french film about surviving tragedy. More info: http://mubi.com/films/three-colors-blue

No Country for Old Men: Who doesn't like this movie? One of the Coen Brothers' best. More info: http://mubi.com/films/no-country-for-old-men

The Innkeepers: Horror done right. It's not about blood. It's about what forces lie down the hallway when you're alone at night. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-innkeepers

Lost in Translation: Sofia Coppola says she was most inspired by Wong Kar-Wai's film In the Mood for Love (see further above) when she directed this film starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. More info: http://mubi.com/films/lost-in-translation

Secret Sunshine (subtitled): This film features a devastating performance by the lead. It asks some tough questions. Midway through might put the viewer in a position to judge, but nothing is cut and dried in this film: The trailer: http://www.criterion.com/films/27750-secret-sunshine?q=autocomplete

True Grit: I love this film by the Coen Brothers. Hailee Steinfeld steals the show. More info: http://mubi.com/films/true-grit--2

The Makioka Sisters: This film might not be for everyone. But if you give it a chance, you'll be drawn into the lives of these four Japanese sisters. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-makioka-sisters

Jane Eyre: The cinematography in this film is excellent and the dialogue between Jane and Mr. Blackthorne is top notch. Some of the shots look like Rembrandt paintings. More info: http://mubi.com/films/jane-eyre--2

The Thin Red Line: A surreal existentialist piece by Terrence Malick. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-thin-red-line

The asterisk next to the following movies indicate that I actually have not yet seen the following films, but they are so highly critically acclaimed or loved by many, and on my soon to watch list, that they bear mentioning.

*Raise the Red Lantern: More info: http://mubi.com/films/raise-the-red-lantern

*Cyclo: More info: http://mubi.com/films/cyclo

*The Human Condition: More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-human-condition

*Seven Samurai: Without a doubt Akira Kurosawa's most famous film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/seven-samurai

*The Cranes are Flying: Russian film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-cranes-are-flying

*The Spirit of the Beehive: Spanish film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-spirit-of-the-beehive

*Tokyo Story: Yasijuro's most famous film and voted the greatest film of all time. More info: http://mubi.com/films/tokyo-story

*Raging Bull: A Martin Scorsese film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/raging-bull

*Lust, Caution: More info: http://mubi.com/films/lust-caution

*Fallen Angels: A Wong Kar-Wai film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/fallen-angels

*Oldboy: More info: http://mubi.com/films/oldboy

*The Mirror: One of Andrei Tarkovsky's most famous films. More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-mirror

*Woman of the Lake: More info: http://mubi.com/films/woman-of-the-lake

*Twenty-four Eyes: A Japanese film very much loved film by the Japanese. More info: http://mubi.com/films/twenty-four-eyes

*Vengeance is Mine: More info (trailer contains nudity): http://mubi.com/films/vengeance-is-mine

*Ashes of Time Redux: A Wong Kar-Wai film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/ashes-of-time

*The Insect Woman: More info: http://mubi.com/films/the-insect-woman

*Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring: More info: http://mubi.com/films/spring-summer-fall-winter-and-spring

*Adaptation: More info: http://mubi.com/films/adaptation

*Poetry: More info: http://mubi.com/films/poetry

*Farewell my Concubine: More info: http://mubi.com/films/farewell-my-concubine

*Intentions of Murder: More info: http://mubi.com/films/intentions-of-murder

*Sansho the Bailiff: More info: http://mubi.com/films/sansho-the-bailiff

*Rashomon: More info: http://mubi.com/films/rashomon

*Ivan's Childhood: One of Andre Tarkovsky's most famous films. Actually, does Tarkovsky have any films that are not famous? More info: http://mubi.com/films/ivans-childhood

*When a Woman Ascends the Stairs: More info: http://mubi.com/films/when-a-woman-ascends-the-stairs

*Yojimbo: An Akira Kurosawa film. More info: http://mubi.com/films/yojimbo

*Harakiri: More info: http://mubi.com/films/harakiri

*Cafe Lumiere: More info: http://mubi.com/films/cafe-lumiere

*Ugetsu: Considered to be one of the greatest films of all time. More info: http://mubi.com/films/ugetsu

*Street of Shame: More info: http://mubi.com/films/street-of-shame

Join ICO Now A blockchain platform for effective freelancing
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1511358716
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1511358716

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1511358716
Reply with quote  #2

1511358716
Report to moderator
finkleshnorts
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 336



View Profile
September 16, 2012, 04:50:40 AM
 #2

Ever since I first saw Steve McQueen's (no, not that Steve) Hunger over two years ago, it has been my favorite movie (although, I'm not sure if I'm allowed to have a favorite movie, as a self-professed film lover).

Hunger is one of those rare, visceral films that shakes you to the core of your humanity. I'm in the middle of watching it again, and it is as rewarding--and challenging--as ever.

In my opinion, it's one of the most starkly original films of the decade. What's more: it manages to never feel like a gimmick. It doesn't emit the slightest hint of stereotypical art-house pretension, because it's storytelling is so pure and seamless.

I could talk for hours about the meaning of the film, it's intentions, and the questions it raises. But I'd just encourage everyone to sit down and watch it. Commit to it. Don't look away. You'll soon find yourself completely immersed in it's characters and horrifically hypnotic imagery. It's a sensory and emotional experience unlike any other you'll encounter on-screen.

*unpause*
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 16, 2012, 04:55:16 AM
 #3

Ever since I first saw Steve McQueen's (no, not that Steve) Hunger over two years ago, it has been my favorite movie (although, I'm not sure if I'm allowed to have a favorite movie, as a self-professed film lover).

Hunger is one of those rare, visceral films that shakes you to the core of your humanity. I'm in the middle of watching it again, and it is as rewarding--and challenging--as ever.

In my opinion, it's one of the most starkly original films of the decade. What's more: it manages to never feel like a gimmick. It doesn't emit the slightest hint of stereotypical art-house pretension, because it's storytelling is so pure and seamless.

I could talk for hours about the meaning of the film, it's intentions, and the questions it raises. But I'd just encourage everyone to sit down and watch it. Commit to it. Don't look away. You'll soon find yourself completely immersed in it's characters and horrifically hypnotic imagery. It's a sensory and emotional experience unlike any other you'll encounter on-screen.

Absolutely beautiful film. And the dialog sequence midway through is amazing, given it's single shot take of 16 (or was it 22?) minutes. I was stunned at the end when I learned how many days his strike lasted. Fassbender is great. I also liked him in X-Men: First Class, Jane Eyre and Inglourious Basterds.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 16, 2012, 04:55:46 AM
 #4

Pale Flower, 1964. A stylish, cool noir. Mariko Kaga as Saeko is stunning. It's considered to be one of the 'Great Films'. The soundtrack is powerful. It seems that everyone who watches this film comes away really liking it. Criterion's transfer to Blu-ray is stunning.

Pale Flower: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOOr4nuWFqU
finkleshnorts
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 336



View Profile
September 16, 2012, 05:07:45 AM
 #5

And the dialog sequence midway through is amazing, given it's single shot take of 16 (or was it 22?) minutes.

I believe it's 20+. I recall reading that the scene broke some records. The change of pace there is so incredibly appropriate.

Pale Flower, 1964. A stylish, cool noir. Mariko Kaga as Saeko is stunning. It's considered to be one of the 'Great Films'. The soundtrack is powerful. It seems that everyone who watches this film comes away really liking it. Criterion's transfer to Blu-ray is stunning.

Pale Flower: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOOr4nuWFqU

I'll definitely check it out. I've heard of it before.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 16, 2012, 06:25:55 AM
 #6

I believe it's 20+. I recall reading that the scene broke some records. The change of pace there is so incredibly appropriate.

The guy who plays the priest, he actually moved in with Fassbender for a month explicitly to practice that scene every day for a month.


I'll definitely check it out. I've heard of it before.

There are some great films from the Japanese New Wave of the sixties, Pale Flower among them. Interestingly, most films from the Japanese New Wave Cinema are shot in 2.35:1 aspect ratio (a good thing).

And at this moment, I was watching Wong Kar-Wai's 2046 again. I just paused it at the taxi ride scene. The shots are just so dreamy. And Zhang Ziyi's performance is just amazing. Here's the clip linked below (the film is in gorgeous color, but this scene is a pseudo black and white, and definitely not as black and white as the youtube clip, nor as blurry). The slow motion and music combined with the streaking lights and expression on her face are just beyond words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRfPF3tLIGQ

EDIT: Funny! I used almost the same words as the comments on the video. There's just no other way to describe these things, I guess.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 01:49:09 AM
 #7

Quote from: Bitcoin population at large
I don't like films, and I don't know any films, and if I did, I couldn't engage in discussion about them.

You're kidding! Really? I think you should give it a shot (watch films, recommend them, or thank others for recommending them).
Phinnaeus Gage
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


Bitcoin: An Idea Worth Spending


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 02:24:02 AM
 #8

No spoiler!

I truly enjoyed The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFk0T0eQonw (trailer)

Sorry for not provided a description.

~Bruno~
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 02:42:13 AM
 #9

I truly enjoyed The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFk0T0eQonw (trailer)

That's actually a Criterion title now. That says something.

Consider the films mentioned thus far in this thread:

Hunger: It is a Criterion film.
Pale Flower: It is a Criterion film.
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: It is a Criterion film.
2046: It is not a Criterion film, but two of the director's films are. They are Chungking Express and In the Mood For Love.

What does Criterion have to say about The Curious Case of Benjamin Button?

Essay #1: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1167-the-vision-is-in-the-details-on-working-with-david-fincher

Essay #2: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1146-bits-and-bobbles-of-benjamin-button

Essay #3: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1125-the-curious-case-of-benjamin-button-the-man-who-watched-the-hours-go-by

Criterion's general page for the movie: http://www.criterion.com/films/1584-the-curious-case-of-benjamin-button
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 03:09:31 AM
 #10

One of the movies that really stands out for me was Oldboy.

Discussing it without spoilers is fairly difficult. It was simply a powerful film, even if not always pleasant. Certainly unlike anything else I've seen.

Definitely go with the original Korean and sub-titles if necessary.

I own it on Blu-ray. I have not watched it yet. Please do not spoil it for me. I selected Oldboy due to my method of discovering movies to watch. Since you liked Oldboy, I really think you should take a harder look at the films that I'm mentioning in this thread.

And I think you should always watch a film with the original audio and use subtitles if you need to. Do not watch audio dubs, except perhaps for animated films. The reason is because the original spoken language contains the acting, which is part of the film and the characters.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 04:13:33 AM
 #11

There are two films by Hiroshi Teshigahara that I highly recommend. They fall into the category of avant-garde existentialism. Yes, there's actually such a category, if you dig deep enough into the art world. There's actually three films, but among the three, I find number two and number three to be the best. These films were made in the mid '60s.

Actually, author Kobo Abe and Hiroshi Teshigahara collaborated together during this period. Abe was the writer, and Teshigahara was the director, and these films are really the product of their deep collaboration. These are heavy films. They will reside in your head after they are over.

The first film, entitled Woman in the Dunes, is well known and critically acclaimed. There's a ton of information out there about Woman in the Dunes, on blogs and such. As is typical of Japanese trailers, especially from the sixties, you'll find there's a little bit of nudity even in the original trailer: http://www.reelz.com/trailer-clips/28000/woman-in-the-dunes-trailer/

The second film, entitled The Face of Another, is more polished, but probably a little less known and critically acclaimed. I really enjoyed this film as well. The story is excellent, and the filmmaking is superb. Not to be missed: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK5Rz6txcDU

If you choose not to watch these two films, you're only cheating yourself out of something extraordinary.

More information is available at Criterion: http://www.criterion.com/boxsets/458-three-films-by-hiroshi-teshigahara?q=autocomplete

Woman in the Dunes: http://www.criterion.com/films/826-woman-in-the-dunes

The Face of Another: http://www.criterion.com/films/828-the-face-of-another

Essay on The Face of Another: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/592-the-face-of-another-double-vision

General essay: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/607-the-spectral-landscape-of-teshigahara-abe-and-takemitsu
Phinnaeus Gage
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


Bitcoin: An Idea Worth Spending


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 05:14:40 AM
 #12

I truly enjoyed The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFk0T0eQonw (trailer)

That's actually a Criterion title now. That says something.

Consider the films mentioned thus far in this thread:

Hunger: It is a Criterion film.
Pale Flower: It is a Criterion film.
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: It is a Criterion film.
2046: It is not a Criterion film, but two of the director's films are. They are Chungking Express and In the Mood For Love.

What does Criterion have to say about The Curious Case of Benjamin Button?

Essay #1: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1167-the-vision-is-in-the-details-on-working-with-david-fincher

Essay #2: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1146-bits-and-bobbles-of-benjamin-button

Essay #3: http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1125-the-curious-case-of-benjamin-button-the-man-who-watched-the-hours-go-by

Criterion's general page for the movie: http://www.criterion.com/films/1584-the-curious-case-of-benjamin-button

You got to be kidding me! I barely read any of the posts, simply posting one of my true favorites, and you're now telling me that it's related to the others posted thus far? Amazing!

~Bruno~
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 05:26:17 AM
 #13

You got to be kidding me! I barely read any of the posts, simply posting one of my true favorites, and you're now telling me that it's related to the others posted thus far? Amazing!

The sad thing is your admission that you've barely read any of the posts. I have nearly fainted from this truth. Please read the posts so that your life will be enriched. You're missing out. And I'm serious.
cbeast
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1736

Let's talk governance, lipstick, and pigs.


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 05:27:17 AM
 #14

At the risk of going OT, I get tired of people saying that the book was better. I doubt that any average Joe has a better imagination than the great directors, DPs, lighting, makeup, talent, etc. Their cumulative efforts are often quite astounding. Sometimes it seems they compress the information of a thousand words into 24 fps.

Any significantly advanced cryptocurrency is indistinguishable from Ponzi Tulips.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 05:51:21 AM
 #15

At the risk of going OT, I get tired of people saying that the book was better. I doubt that any average Joe has a better imagination than the great directors, DPs, lighting, makeup, talent, etc. Their cumulative efforts are often quite astounding. Sometimes it seems they compress the information of a thousand words into 24 fps.

Actually, here's my take on it. Let's say a film is coming out, and it's based on a much loved book. The following scenarios, among others, present themselves:

1. You haven't read the book, and you're looking forward to seeing the movie. In such a case, watch the movie first, and then read the book if you so wish.

2. You have read the book, loved it, and now you want to see the movie. The movie might disappoint, because you have your expectations of what should be in the movie, and how the characters are. Film is a different medium. It cannot, nor should it, try and be exactly like the book.

I never read the Dragon Tattoo books, but I hear they're good. Instead, I decided I just wanted to enjoy the movies. Nor have I seen the Swedish versions. So I watched Fincher's version with Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara. My view of the film is not tainted by the books or the Swedish films. And I can say that I thoroughly enjoyed the American version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 17, 2012, 04:25:03 PM
 #16

It doesn't emit the slightest hint of stereotypical art-house pretension, because it's storytelling is so pure and seamless.

Interesting statement. Not your assessment of Hunger, but your statement in general about the possible qualities of arthouse films. It calls to question what makes an arthouse film an arthouse film. I might be inclined to say that there are possibly four levels of arthouse films:

1. Those that display arthouse pretension. Are they really arthouse films then, instead of just being wannabees?

2. Those that are very arty in their subject matter, techniques of cinematography, etc., and one might be inclined to accuse them of arthouse pretension, but one shouldn't, because they're just so interesting, or meditative, or beautiful, or something.

3. Those films which mostly seem like a mainstream film, but get the arthouse label due to them being an indie, their beautiful cinematography, and thought provoking subject matter.

4. Those films which have been critically acclaimed and are very good, but never got the proper exposure due to distribution, and perhaps they did not contain enough explosions.
Phinnaeus Gage
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


Bitcoin: An Idea Worth Spending


View Profile
September 18, 2012, 01:10:43 AM
 #17

You got to be kidding me! I barely read any of the posts, simply posting one of my true favorites, and you're now telling me that it's related to the others posted thus far? Amazing!

The sad thing is your admission that you've barely read any of the posts. I have nearly fainted from this truth. Please read the posts so that your life will be enriched. You're missing out. And I'm serious.

I offer no excuses, but I did, this time it may have bordered on time constraint. To be fair, I glimpsed over the posts, but didn't digest them. It was kindly like, nice, nice, nice, etc., my turn. That said, your post, FirstAscent, was warranted.

~Bruno~
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 18, 2012, 03:36:00 AM
 #18

You got to be kidding me! I barely read any of the posts, simply posting one of my true favorites, and you're now telling me that it's related to the others posted thus far? Amazing!

The sad thing is your admission that you've barely read any of the posts. I have nearly fainted from this truth. Please read the posts so that your life will be enriched. You're missing out. And I'm serious.

I offer no excuses, but I did, this time it may have bordered on time constraint. To be fair, I glimpsed over the posts, but didn't digest them. It was kindly like, nice, nice, nice, etc., my turn. That said, your post, FirstAscent, was warranted.

You are, in fact, still invited, even urged, to do more than gloss over the posts, and give the linked trailers or clips a spin, and then provide deep insightful commentary.
JMAHH
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 280


View Profile
September 18, 2012, 03:47:44 AM
 #19

Old Boy, Pale Flower, FirstAscent's suggestions... There is quite some Asian emphasis there. Do we have an explanation?
FirstAscent
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 812


View Profile
September 18, 2012, 03:55:28 AM
 #20

Old Boy, Pale Flower, FirstAscent's suggestions... There is quite some Asian emphasis there. Do we have an explanation?

It happens to be the current meander that the thread is currently in. It might meander in the opposite direction soon. Also, have you seen these films? I think you might want to. Very much so. However, I can assure you that I will offer up some Russian films, as well as French and German films. Maybe others. And even contemporary well known American films. Anyone else is welcome to recommend a film.

As for the current suggestions, do you have any take, one way or another on some of the Asian films presented, such as Pale Flower, Woman in the Dunes, 2046, or others? Feel free to comment on the trailers themselves, or the films, if you've seen them. No spoilers please!
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!