Bitcoin Forum
September 23, 2018, 10:51:38 PM *
News: ♦♦ New info! Bitcoin Core users absolutely must upgrade to previously-announced 0.16.3 [Torrent]. All Bitcoin users should temporarily trust confirmations slightly less. More info.
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: « 1 [2]  All
  Print  
Author Topic: China issues report on human rights progress  (Read 1234 times)
Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
October 29, 2015, 10:00:18 PM
 #21


Menschenrechtsbeauftragter Strässer verurteilt Verhaftungswelle gegen Anwälte in China


Hast Du Heute Abend Bier getrunken oder Schnaps?

This is a English language forum page.

Einax Airdrops and Bounties made easy! List your ERC-20 token
FREE
ETH markets launching soon!
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
October 29, 2015, 10:12:30 PM
 #22




WOW, a paid actors from http://www.epochtimes.com/ ??
Nice picture!
Please, post more!

I have just asking You, how much chinese are living in Los Angeles?

Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
October 30, 2015, 01:33:26 AM
 #23



Two men act as human traffic signals on Monday at an intersection in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province. [Wang Yongbo/China Daily]

Human traffic lights ensure smooth travel in Hebei

Many people have probably played a role in a drama, or pretended to be an animal to entertain children, but few have had a chance to act as human traffic lights like the two heroes in our story.

Two men took on the job of human traffic signals at an intersection in Shijiazhuang, North China's Hebei province, when the electric traffic signals broke down and several traffic accidents occurred over the past month, Yanzhao Evening Post reported on Tuesday.

Liu Yichen, 33, and Chen Liwei, 39, are colleagues in a nearby technology company. They set up temporary signals using large plastic boards with the words "stop" and "go", turning in one direction or another every 30 seconds to aid drivers.

The city was evaluating the problem with the lights and sent police officers to direct rush-hour traffic.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/trending/2015-10/28/content_22301968.htm
----------------------------------------------------------------------

What for bloody Chinese Mainland Police, they have not shot them right on the street!

msc_de
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 770
Merit: 500



View Profile
October 30, 2015, 04:23:31 PM
 #24

China Again Rated 'Worst Abuser' of Internet Freedom in NGO Survey

By Paul Eckert
2015-10-28

http://www.rfa.org/english/news/china/china-internet-10282015170233.html

U.S. non-governmental organization again ranked China as the “worst abuser of internet freedom” in an annual survey that found 32 of 65 countries assessed moving on a “negative trajectory” in the year since June 2014.

The Washington-based said global internet freedom has declined for the fifth consecutive year, “with more governments censoring information of public interest and placing greater demands on the private sector to take down offending content.”

China, which scored 88 on a scale on which 100 was the worst, saw an erosion of its previous year’s score of 87, as President Xi Jinping deepened his stress on “cyber sovereignty” as a priority for sustaining Communist Party rule over the nation of 1.3 billion people.

“Over the past year, the renewed emphasis on information controlled to acts of unconcealed aggression against internet freedom,” said the report.

“Internet users endured crackdowns on “rumors,” greater enforcement of rules against anonymity, and disruptions to the circumvention tools that are commonly used to bypass censorship,” it said.

“Though not entirely new, these measures were implemented with unprecedented intensity,” the report added.

Freedom House said the Xi administration’s quest for control meant tough policies for foreign Internet companies, including Google, as well as “undermining of digital security protocols, and its ongoing erosion of user rights, including through extralegal detentions and the imposition of prison sentences for online speech.”

"50 cent" commenters

The report highlighted China’s monitoring, censorship and manipulation of content – tasks it said were carried out by thousands of people employed by party propaganda department, government agencies, and private companies.

“A range of issues are systematically censored, including independent evaluations of China’s human rights record, critiques of government policy, and the authorities’ treatment of ethnic minorities,” said Freedom House.

The report noted that in addition to at least tens of thousands of so-called “50 cent” commenters – those paid to post pro-government comments or derail critical discussions of China on-line – deployed in China, Chinese authorities also use paid commenters abroad, including on social media platforms that are banned in China, like Twitter.

“Approximately 2,500 ‘50 Cent’ users on Twitter follow and retweet one another in order to create confusion and mislead the public,” it said.

The only countries where the internet was deemed less free than China were Syria and Iran, while the Middle East saw the sharpest deterioration in the year covered in the survey.

Vietnam – which like China is a one-party state led by Communists – scored a 76 and “with 29 netizens imprisoned … continues to be one of the worst jailers of bloggers in the world,” said the report.

“With fewer resources devoted to online content control than in China, the Vietnamese authorities have nevertheless established an effective content filtering system,” it said.

“Blocking in Vietnam primarily targets topics with the potential to threaten the Vietnam Communist Party’s (VCP) political power, including political dissent, human rights and democracy, as well as websites criticizing the government’s reaction to border and sea disputes between China and Vietnam,” said the report.

Old habits in Myanmar

Also rated “not free” by Freedom House was the internet of slowly democratizing Myanmar, which scored 63 on the scale.

“Internet freedom in Myanmar declined during the coverage period of this report in comparison with the progress made since the country undertook liberalization in 2011,” said the report.

In the country formerly called Burma that has emerged from nearly 50 years of hard-line army rule, “government and security forces stepped up intimidation of internet users during social protests, intensifying conflict in ethnic minority regions, and during preparation for the 2015 national elections,” it said.

Freedom House noted that while former military leader President Thein Sein officially ended media censorship in 2012, and allowed internet freedom to improve in 2013 “the situation began to deteriorate in late 2014 as the practices of the old regime were revived.”

Cambodia was rated “partly free” by Freedom House, which gave it a score of 48 and noted that the Internet remains the freest medium in the Southeast Asian country.

“A potentially repressive cybercrime law, leaked in draft form in early 2014, remains pending” in Phnom Penh, the report warned.

“A separate draft telecommunications law that threatens the privacy and anonymity of internet users through increased surveillance was leaked to the public in June 2014,” said Freedom House.

The 968-page report on 65 countries is published at https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-net/freedom-net-2015
Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
October 30, 2015, 04:54:21 PM
 #25


Huang walks with stones on his feet and carries two dumbbells in his hands for 200 meters in Bairen village, Supo town, Chengdu, South China's Sichuan province, on Thursday. [Photo/IC]

Man walks with 50 kg stones on his feet

How much weight can you carry with your hands or on your back? Maybe 50kg, 100kg or something approaching the weightlifting world record of around 200 kg? But how about lifting loads with your feet?

A 55-year-old man, surnamed Huang, can surprisingly lift 50kg of stones with his feet and carry them, along with two dumbbells in his hands for 200 meters in Bairen village, Supo town in Chengdu, South China's Sichuan province, dfic.cn reported on Thursday.

Huang said that he's walked with stones on his feet every day for years as a way to exercise and he's "worn out" seven pairs of stones.

He also said that someone once challenged him but it ended with the challenger suffering a fractured foot bone.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/trending/2015-10/30/content_22325700.htm

Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
October 31, 2015, 10:38:16 AM
 #26

A school with only one teacher and one student



Sixin primary school is located in Gaoyang, Southwest China's Chongqing municipality. With the reform of rural education and urbanization, more and more rural students have gone to the central primary school in town. Wu Tao became the last student of Sixin primary school in 2013 as his parents engaged in farm work and they did not want their child to stay far away from them. The teacher who has been accompanying him in the school is Xiang Zhengguo. As the only teacher in the school, he teaches 10 courses including Chinese, math, PE, and music. Xiang takes on all teaching tasks. [Photo/Xinhua]


Xiang Guozheng helps Wu Tao with his work. [Photo/Xinhua]


Xiang Guozheng gives a lesson to Wu Tao in Sixin primary school in Gaoyang, Chongqing on Oct 21. [Photo/Xinhua]


Xiang Guozheng and Wu Tao do physical exercise. [Photo/Xinhua]


Xiang Guozheng has lunch with Wu Tao. [Photo/Xinhua]


Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
November 12, 2015, 12:15:50 PM
 #27



New 100-yuan notes wheeled out in the factory of China Banknote Printing and Minting Corporation, Oct 29. [Photo/Xinhua]

The People's Bank of China, which issued a new 100 yuan note today, has been transporting ever increasing quantities of renminbi to foreign countries to meet a growing demand for China's currency.
The central bank transported 50 billion yuan ($7.9 billion) in cash to Hong Kong, the country's offshore RMB center, during the first nine months of the year, an increase of more than 46 percent year-on-year, according to a bank insider in Shenzhen.
"From 2004 to 2007, we shipped less than 5 billion yuan cash to Hong Kong every year. We transported about 27 billion yuan cash annually since the demand for RMB cash surged in 2008," said Zhang Jianjun, director of the central bank's subcentral branch in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, which is responsible for 83 percent of China's cross-border RMB cash transportation in China.
In 2007, the central bank launched the first offshore RMB cash storage in Hong Kong managed by the Bank of China, which provides cash and flow-back services for overseas markets. So far, 221 foreign banks from 19 countries in Asia, North America, Europe, Oceania and Africa, have opened cash accounts with RMB Clearing Banks in Hong Kong.
RMB cash mainly crosses borders in one of two ways: carried by individuals and transported by commercial banks.
Since 2005, Chinese citizens and foreigners who leave or enter the country can carry no more than 20,000 yuan per person.
Chinese commercial banks in border areas cooperate with banks in neighboring countries on cash transportation, based on the bilateral local currency settlement agreements for border trade.
The central bank also authorized offshore RMB clearing banks in Hong Kong and Taiwan to transport cash.
The volume of cross-border RMB cash transported by banks is steadily increasing, according to a statement from the central bank. Last year, RMB cash transported in China reached 39.9 billion yuan, while 11.7 billion yuan was transported out. The total transported amount rose 23.2 percent from a year earlier.
"The increasing use of RMB cash in offshore markets will promote outbound tourism and business, as well as strengthen confidence of RMB internationalization among overseas investors," said Lo Pingwa, head of the Bank-wide Operation Department of Bank of China in Hong Kong.
The latest report from global transaction service provider SWIFT showed that the RMB remains the fifth-largest international payment currency by value, and accounted for 2.45 percent of global payments in September.
Michael Moon, head of payments for Asia Pacific at SWIFT, said that it is important to note that the RMBs underlying growth is trending positive.
"Such a trend is supported by an increasing number of corporates adopting the RMB for trade settlements, and a rising number of banks supporting those payments," Moon said.
The central regards the RMB note as China's business card and the new optical features of the 2015 version of the 100 yuan banknote are designed to improve protection against counterfeiting, with some advanced technologies especially developed for vending machines and ATMs.
The changes also make it easier for the public to discern a fake banknote, as the new note shows a more obvious security strip and a special color for the central "100".

http://europe.chinadaily.com.cn/2015-11/12/content_22441012.htm
Currency detectors designed to detect counterfeit RMB notes have been upgraded for the new notes in domestic and foreign banks.

Vika NSFW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 406
Merit: 250



View Profile WWW
November 12, 2015, 12:25:31 PM
 #28


Pages: « 1 [2]  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!