Bitcoin Forum
November 22, 2017, 05:19:54 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.15.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Easy to understand, non-techie guide on how the system works, what to do?  (Read 926 times)
manicminer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 302



View Profile
January 15, 2013, 07:41:31 AM
 #1

- Should I run it through a VPN/proxy/TOR or it doesn't matter? (I know how to connect it but need some reasoning and understanding, some background on the surface.) If I run at without anonimizing it's less suspicious I guess. But I'm not an expert. YMMW.
- I'm not interested in the paranoia about how to secure my paper wallet in a safe-deposit box, thank you. Just normal business... running a client, and having some spare money.

On the Tor site they have just a good overview for a noob: https://www.torproject.org/about/overview
Compare that to the Bitcoin Wiki: it's just too technical. Satoshi's manuscript was too technical also. Other stuff I read was about just how to open e-Wallets and trade, no big deal. I need something in between. I have to understand. But with god reasoning.

Where should I go?

Edit: should I download the initial blockchain through anonimizer or it doesn't matter? How to set up the client not to lean data, only in that case I should anonimize.
Join ICO Now Coinlancer is Disrupting the Freelance marketplace!
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
DannyHamilton
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 1988



View Profile
January 15, 2013, 03:01:09 PM
 #2

- Should I run it through a VPN/proxy/TOR. . . Where should I go? . . . should I download the initial blockchain through anonimizer . . .
It is very difficult to answer questions about what you should do without knowing what you are trying to accomplish.  If you just want to receive and spend bitcoins, and anonymity isn't important to you, then there is no need to waste your time on all those extra efforts.

On the other hand, if you have a fear that a government agency is going to come after you and destroy your life because you use bitcoin, then anonymity becomes much more important and you would need to use software such as TOR.


manicminer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 302



View Profile
January 16, 2013, 05:25:17 AM
 #3

First of all the govt. is my least concern, I just want to be safe from Internet crooks. With that said, the govt. has no business in my secret Bitcoin nest egg, so I rather have a Swiss bank account like more secured setup than an American bank account type which is in plain sight; everyone can see.
Atruk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 700



View Profile
January 16, 2013, 01:17:21 PM
 #4

First of all the govt. is my least concern, I just want to be safe from Internet crooks. With that said, the govt. has no business in my secret Bitcoin nest egg, so I rather have a Swiss bank account like more secured setup than an American bank account type which is in plain sight; everyone can see.

Then hiding your ip address is one of your lesser concerns. Just use Armory and use a different address for each transaction. Most serious threats from internet crooks you face with bitcoin involve social engineering, but just take a bit more serious than normal precautions against malware. You should be fine.

deepceleron
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1512



View Profile WWW
January 16, 2013, 04:11:36 PM
 #5

If you want to be anonymous, then there are two aspects to consider, IP address leakage, and address tracking. Both are a concern only when they reveal payments that can be tracked to you, since Bitcoin itself isn't illegal anywhere (although your use of Bitcoin could build a case: "We intercepted drugs mailed to him, and we know his IP address runs Bitcoin, a nefarious underworld currency only used for buying drugs".)

You can install the software, and synchronize the blockchain without revealing any information about yourself, except that other Bitcoin users may be able to detect that you are also running Bitcoin at your IP address. There is one exception to this statement, a recent disclosure documented a potential issue where an attacker might be able to discover if a particular address is owned by a particular peer.

When you receive money, no information is communicated with your client specifically, the payment is just recorded in the blockchain, a payment that only you can spend.

When you send a payment from your own client, however, the transaction is broadcast on the p2p network to all other clients to which you are directly connected. There is a relatively high chance that another well-connected Bitcoin client can determine the IP address that initially broadcast the transaction if mitigation is not done (such as limiting your Bitcoin to only one edge-of-network peer connection to send your payment.)

If you are in a hostile regime where all Internet activity is recorded (perhaps the USA, although the drone strike from above would be the only indication that your funding of terrorism was detected) then TOR with a foreign exit node and a state that doesn't have the resources to get a majority of TOR nodes to corroborate ins and outs would be necessary to anonymize your connection and payments.

The second issue is your conversion of goods and currency to Bitcoin, the trail of addresses is usually easier to follow than IP connections, if specific anonymizing steps are not taken. If I buy or sell something from you, I might send you a payment that is later mixed or connected with other payments you have made or received.

manicminer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 302



View Profile
January 17, 2013, 04:46:40 AM
 #6

Thanks @deepceleron,

Nice writing.

However, I'm still looking for a still easier-to-understand explanation.
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!