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Author Topic: How to build your own power supply?  (Read 13324 times)
BombaUcigasa
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June 28, 2011, 12:43:47 PM
 #61

An acceptable solution would be to use multiple cheaper or lower power PSUs, one for the system and one for each video card, all grounded on the same case. Some companies even sell modular supplemental bay PSU models for such a purpose (GPU only supply). The trick is to power on the secondary PSUs when the main PSU gives the "power good" signal.
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themike5000
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June 28, 2011, 04:16:44 PM
 #62

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817104054

A little more expensive than an extra PSU, but its a lot cleaner, and allows you to hook it up to your PSU and turn off/on with the PC.

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Nagle
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June 28, 2011, 04:50:16 PM
 #63

Power supplies that have a UL approval should deliver their rated output continuously without overheating. UL (which is owned by fire insurance companies) tests that. UL also requires that no single component failure can cause a fire.

Phony UL approval markings are often seen in products from China. But there's a way to check. UL has a database of approvals.  The UL file number on the UL approval sticker must match the manufacturer and the description of the item.

Here's what it takes to test a power supply. Hardware Secrets connects the power supply to a load box, loads it up to its rated output, and runs it for hours at 45C while checking the electrical outputs. See their reviews.
micucci1127
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July 04, 2011, 09:34:38 AM
 #64

You should buy the right stuff if you bought your hashing hardware and you care about how long it lasts on you

if you dont:

I used to do (and still do sometimes) dumb stuff like this too. I think the OP just wants to get more power up and running without having to spend a ton. Especially if you have a surplus of crap power-supplies already.

I work for a small custom computer assembly company, and we have shelves full of useless 300w cheap china crap PSU's that come with the cases we end up not using. they are sitting around wasting space. We use them for various personal purposes and testing and consider them disposable. They blow up, chuck it and grab another one.

check this link:
http://www.directron.com/2powersupplies.html

long story short, you can manually power up an ATX powersupply by shorting pins 14 and 15 on the 20 (or 24) pin primary connector.

If you want to rig up two power supplies for your computer, one for each power supply (or more if you are a lunatic) and power them up at the same time it *should* work. Or check the section where it shows you how to build a relay.

I would stick to one crap power supply per juice guzzling video card, 
if the powersupplies are very low quality do not run them at the rated load listed on them, stick to 50-60% (if it says 300w on the sticker and its a single 12v rail dont push it past 150)

I have a few Radeon 5770's and 4870's hashing, and I have had experience with running radeons with insufficent power. If the radeon looses juice from the 6-pin connector under a load, (has happened to me) the motherboard should error out and shut down the primary powersupply attached to the motherboard, some of the older ones also have wonderful beepers on them that will scream like a banshee if they don't have enough power. If you are in the building you will know it.

I take no responsibility for whatever crap you break trying to do this. There is a right way of doing things and the "get it done now for $0" way of doing things.

as for the health risks? Try not to lick the power supplies or any exposed wire leads while in your bare feet.

Good Luck
zerokwel
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July 04, 2011, 09:52:42 AM
 #65

Please if you decide to build your own please PLEASE video it when you first power it up. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley
Vladimir
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July 04, 2011, 11:22:59 AM
 #66

Please if you decide to build your own please PLEASE video it when you first power it up. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

yep, great idea! Youtube revenue from great video of spectacularly blowing up a self made PSU could be higher than any possible savings you hoped to get by replacing decent and expensive PSU's.

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Fiyasko
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July 04, 2011, 07:10:23 PM
 #67

ehhhhhhhhhhhhhh your half right

I'm pretty sure i'm 100% right, do you mind pointing out what's the 50% wrong part of what i wrote?
Nou... because i reread it and you are 100% right but the metaphor threw me off

http://bitcoin-otc.com/viewratingdetail.php?nick=DingoRabiit&sign=ANY&type=RECV <-My Ratings
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Nagle
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July 04, 2011, 07:23:45 PM
 #68

If you think you can design a better PC-type switching power supply, here's how to try.

Download LTspice, which is a circuit simulator optimized for switching power supply design. Take a look at the data sheets for switching power supply control ICs. Read the application notes. Find some switching power supply transformers for which specs are available, and try to design around them. Don't forget protective circuitry. When you have a circuit that works in simulation, post your LTspice file.

If you're really good, you might be able to duplicate the performance of commercial design for 2x to 3x the price in quantity 1. PC power supplies are incredibly cheap for their power output. As a rule of thumb, industrial power supplies cost about a dollar a watt. PC supplies are far cheaper.

I've designed a switching power supply, but it was for a special application for which no off the shelf solution existed.



 
V4Vendettas
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July 05, 2011, 12:56:44 PM
 #69

If you dont youtube this you will be commiting a bitcoin mining sin!

And will go to hell and stuff plz plz plz youtube it  Grin

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