Bitcoin Forum
November 21, 2017, 02:24:27 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.15.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: Ad-blocking dilemma is solved by cryptocurrency.  (Read 1116 times)
aliceHortrex
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 252


View Profile WWW
April 06, 2016, 11:32:40 AM
 #1

Cryptocurrency ADZcoin proposed the solution to ad-blocking issue.

As far as I understood, publisher just adds the code on its website and can accept donations in adzcoins which users get for free. These donation widgets replace the ads for those who use adblock.

Great job, guys! I found and tested this on review of Cointelegraph.


Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1511274267
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1511274267

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1511274267
Reply with quote  #2

1511274267
Report to moderator
1511274267
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1511274267

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1511274267
Reply with quote  #2

1511274267
Report to moderator
1511274267
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1511274267

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1511274267
Reply with quote  #2

1511274267
Report to moderator
instacalm
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 714


View Profile WWW
April 06, 2016, 12:49:47 PM
 #2

Why do we need a new specific coin for this? How about using an existing cryptocurrency that is rather known and already widely used?

I agree that micropayments are indeed a great area of application for cryptocurrency.
aliceHortrex
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 252


View Profile WWW
April 06, 2016, 02:47:44 PM
 #3

Why do we need a new specific coin for this? How about using an existing cryptocurrency that is rather known and already widely used?

I agree that micropayments are indeed a great area of application for cryptocurrency.

I think it was just easier to make this using new currency rather than try to make bitcoin work with it.
TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 06, 2016, 03:02:28 PM
 #4

Making users pay a micropayment to access a web page is never going work. The reason is because the cognitive load of each action is far too high:

http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2009/02/why-small-payments-wont-save-publishers/

Yet another stupid shit coin.

alyssa85
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1008


View Profile
April 06, 2016, 03:10:32 PM
 #5

Why do we need a new specific coin for this? How about using an existing cryptocurrency that is rather known and already widely used?

I agree that micropayments are indeed a great area of application for cryptocurrency.

Well Brave.com is a browser that will use BTC for this. See

https://brave.com/blogpost_3.html

TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 06, 2016, 03:41:18 PM
 #6

Why do we need a new specific coin for this? How about using an existing cryptocurrency that is rather known and already widely used?

I agree that micropayments are indeed a great area of application for cryptocurrency.

Well Brave.com is a browser that will use BTC for this. See

https://brave.com/blogpost_3.html

They believe that users will agree to be paid to watch some ads in order to earn the BTC to pay to not see ads on their other favorite sites. That is the carrot. The stick is that normal ads will be blocked by default for all users.

Problem is that there are much more lucrative monetization gamification models than advertising, which spam and intrude on users less. Advertising is going to die and be replaced with superior gamification which is more attuned to users' preferences.

Also users and publishers don't want to hand such control over to the Brave team. The only solutions that will be widely adopted will be those not controlled by anyone, i.e. decentralized protocols.

Brendan Eich better stick with his core competency of the programming language Javascript.

instacalm
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 714


View Profile WWW
April 06, 2016, 03:44:59 PM
 #7

The only solutions that will be widely adopted will be those not controlled by anyone, i.e. decentralized protocols.
Not so sure about that!


Problem is that there are much more lucrative monetization gamification models than advertising, which spam and intrude on users less. Advertising is going to die and be replaced with superior gamification which is more attuned to users' preferences.

Interesting! Do you have any examples of "lucrative monetisation gamification models"? Conventional online advertising seems to be on the verge of death indeed.
A.Raserei
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 31


View Profile WWW
April 06, 2016, 09:52:13 PM
 #8

it`s doesn`t work for cointelegraph`s ads  Cool  Cool  Cool

CT`s product manager
TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 07, 2016, 12:31:00 AM
 #9

The only solutions that will be widely adopted will be those not controlled by anyone, i.e. decentralized protocols.

Not so sure about that!

The decentralized protocols of the Internet proved that already in spades! Widescale investment in an ecosystem only occurs when the protocol is not controlled by vested interests.

This is the reason Bitcoin is stagnating.

An example of what happens with permissioned ledger, closed entropy systems in the market.  This NEM coin (standard PoS with some rube goldberg mechanisms on top of it) was pumped to a huge market cap.  Just like what happened with NXT, it now just kind of sits there with nobody really wanting to do anything with it.  This is crazy low volume compared to the 400-500 volume most altcoins have on the Bologniex casino nowadays:



These closed entropy systems where the entire coin supply was issued at genesis had their brief time in the sun because people were fascinated by the idea of not having their shares temporarily diluted through mining, but now there are so many of them, the novelty is gone and people are forced to re-examine what actually constitutes a decentralized currency in the first place.  It will be just like NXT.  The market cap will remain high, but the buy side will constantly wither away until the sum of the buy side is only 15 BTC (like NXT was a few months ago).  This makes them "roach motels" where you're theoretically wealthy, but nobody can actually exit the coin at all.

Facebook gives away a massive amount of photo hosting in order to bait the users to adopt, but now that Facebook has started to monetize the users, it is starting to stomp on the best interests of users and its adoption is slowing down and upstarts are nipping at niches around it. But when a decentralized paradigm offers something that Facebook can't do, it will be lights out for Facebook because decentralized adoption of an ecosystem scales much faster.

Problem is that there are much more lucrative monetization gamification models than advertising, which spam and intrude on users less. Advertising is going to die and be replaced with superior gamification which is more attuned to users' preferences.

Interesting! Do you have any examples of "lucrative monetisation gamification models"? Conventional online advertising seems to be on the verge of death indeed.

Why bombard with banner advertising when you can recommend/mention/link to something (preferably which is entirely free to start using, and which itself uses gamification to earn revenue) within the context of your content which your reader really needs and then receive an affiliation income from which is much greater than the income from spamming readers with shit only usually less than 1% of readers are even interested to click on. In other words, highly targeted advertising without violating the privacy of the user to track their interests and without bombarding them with banner ads.

In case someone might conflate this with Synereo's and Tsu's plan to pay social networking users to share, the salient distinction is that the social networking user is there to share to gain the synergies and love/reputation whereas the blog or publisher is focused on publishing (and monetizing his work so he can continue publishing). Also the social networking user doesn't have reach of readers of a publisher, unless of course he has a high reputation of sharing things that so many others reshare. So one could see some social network publishers arise, but this can't be a model to pay most of the users as I explained in the Synereo thread.

boomboom
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 634



View Profile WWW
April 07, 2016, 02:19:55 AM
 #10


They believe that users will agree to be paid to watch some ads in order to earn the BTC to pay to not see ads on their other favorite sites. That is the carrot. The stick is that normal ads will be blocked by default for all users.

Problem is that there are much more lucrative monetization gamification models than advertising, which spam and intrude on users less. Advertising is going to die and be replaced with superior gamification which is more attuned to users' preferences.

Also users and publishers don't want to hand such control over to the Brave team. The only solutions that will be widely adopted will be those not controlled by anyone, i.e. decentralized protocols.

Brenden Eich better stick with his core competency of the programming language Javascript.

Spot on! advertising is the proverbial megaphone, even when it's targeted to people who have shown some 'interest' it's an inferior method compared to even product placement which is subliminal. I know if a blogger has gained my trust for being authentic and knowledgable in something, I will always consider their recommendations, but currently have little way to micro compensate them. Even on this forum there are users who's opinions I rate very highly, and if there was an easy way to tip them I would more often (i.e browser plugin). I'm not going to open a wallet and send them 50 cents, but I would if it literally was one click in my browser.
TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 07, 2016, 06:26:21 AM
 #11


They believe that users will agree to be paid to watch some ads in order to earn the BTC to pay to not see ads on their other favorite sites. That is the carrot. The stick is that normal ads will be blocked by default for all users.

Problem is that there are much more lucrative monetization gamification models than advertising, which spam and intrude on users less. Advertising is going to die and be replaced with superior gamification which is more attuned to users' preferences.

Also users and publishers don't want to hand such control over to the Brave team. The only solutions that will be widely adopted will be those not controlled by anyone, i.e. decentralized protocols.

Brenden Eich better stick with his core competency of the programming language Javascript.

Spot on! advertising is the proverbial megaphone, even when it's targeted to people who have shown some 'interest' it's an inferior method compared to even product placement which is subliminal. I know if a blogger has gained my trust for being authentic and knowledgable in something, I will always consider their recommendations, but currently have little way to micro compensate them. Even on this forum there are users who's opinions I rate very highly, and if there was an easy way to tip them I would more often (i.e browser plugin). I'm not going to open a wallet and send them 50 cents, but I would if it literally was one click in my browser.

I don't think anyone ever paid their rent from their TipJar.

If you have a specific project, you can crowdfund to get the necessary economy-of-scale to make it work. But just TipJar that sits there is afaik pretty much insignificant.

So while it sounds nice, the economics ostensibly don't work:

Read the linked "why ChangeTip must die".

Perhaps you will argue that tips will be greater if people have an easier and more instant way to tip.

Let's say I have 10,000 readers per month at my blog, and 5% of them tip me on average 50 cents. That is $250 per month. That won't even pay rent. And 5% is I think fairly high conversion rate.

Also I think people get tired of tipping. It sounds nice and everyone is motivated at the start, but over time they will grow weary of the cognitive load of, "who do I tip this month?". They have to organize all their web activity and analyze it. The cognitive load is the real killer.

aliceHortrex
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 252


View Profile WWW
April 07, 2016, 06:41:13 PM
 #12

Making users pay a micropayment to access a web page is never going work. The reason is because the cognitive load of each action is far too high:

http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2009/02/why-small-payments-wont-save-publishers/

Yet another stupid shit coin.


You should have read that more thoroughly. You don't have to pay anything to access the content. Instead you are offered with a donation option that can further enhance the content quality.
BitcoinNewsMagazine
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 966



View Profile WWW
April 07, 2016, 11:32:08 PM
 #13

While an interesting option a webmaster can always host affiliate banners him or her self and Adblockers can do nothing about it. Adsense and other networks can be blocked but self hosted banners cannot. The trick is finding affiliate programs you would use yourself that have compelling banners with good clickthrough rates.

smooth
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1596



View Profile
April 07, 2016, 11:34:11 PM
 #14

While an interesting option a webmaster can always host affiliate banners him or her self and Adblockers can do nothing about it. Adsense and other networks can be blocked but self hosted banners cannot.

Doubtful. Task-specific AI has reached the point where I'd guess you could block ad banners of any source with >95% accuracy rate. If they are a standard size, which the nature of ad networks and mass distribution more or less requires, then it would easily approach 100%
TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 08, 2016, 04:01:13 AM
 #15

You should have read that more thoroughly. You don't have to pay anything to access the content. Instead you are offered with a donation option that can further enhance the content quality.

You should have read that more carefully:

I don't think anyone ever paid their rent from their TipJar.

If you have a specific project, you can crowdfund to get the necessary economy-of-scale to make it work. But just TipJar that sits there is afaik pretty much insignificant.

So while it sounds nice, the economics ostensibly don't work:

Read the linked "why ChangeTip must die".

Perhaps you will argue that tips will be greater if people have an easier and more instant way to tip.

Let's say I have 10,000 readers per month at my blog, and 5% of them tip me on average 50 cents. That is $250 per month. That won't even pay rent. And 5% is I think fairly high conversion rate.

Also I think people get tired of tipping. It sounds nice and everyone is motivated at the start, but over time they will grow weary of the cognitive load of, "who do I tip this month?". They have to organize all their web activity and analyze it. The cognitive load is the real killer.

boomboom
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 634



View Profile WWW
April 08, 2016, 06:31:12 AM
 #16


I don't think anyone ever paid their rent from their TipJar.

If you have a specific project, you can crowdfund to get the necessary economy-of-scale to make it work. But just TipJar that sits there is afaik pretty much insignificant.

So while it sounds nice, the economics ostensibly don't work:

Read the linked "why ChangeTip must die".

Perhaps you will argue that tips will be greater if people have an easier and more instant way to tip.

Let's say I have 10,000 readers per month at my blog, and 5% of them tip me on average 50 cents. That is $250 per month. That won't even pay rent. And 5% is I think fairly high conversion rate.

Also I think people get tired of tipping. It sounds nice and everyone is motivated at the start, but over time they will grow weary of the cognitive load of, "who do I tip this month?". They have to organize all their web activity and analyze it. The cognitive load is the real killer.

That was a thought provoking article, thanks! I agree with much of that analysis for small amounts as he suggested, but for larger amounts I'm not sure. I think we can break tipping into two groups - passive tipping, where you tip someone for content they already produced like a blog, and interactive tipping, where you tip someone for a response they give you. I think the 2nd type has much more potential to generate meaningful income

@TPTB, you for example, could open a Q&A thread for tech & other advice. An answer that takes you a few minutes to write *might* be worth thousands to the questioner. That type of thing would probably fall under 'tipping' but it's different to a fractional penny, and if it was easier to do it might take off.
TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 08, 2016, 06:34:32 AM
 #17

That was a thought provoking article, thanks! I agree with much of that analysis for small amounts as he suggested, but for larger amounts I'm not sure. I think we can break tipping into two groups - passive tipping, where you tip someone for content they already produced like a blog, and interactive tipping, where you tip someone for a response they give you. I think the 2nd type has much more potential to generate meaningful income

@TPTB, you for example, could open a Q&A thread for tech & other advice. An answer that takes you a few minutes to write *might* be worth thousands to the questioner. That type of thing would probably fall under 'tipping' but it's different to a fractional penny, and if it was easier to do it might take off.

Problem is that maybe only the person who asks tips you and the rest just decide you've already been paid. The problem with that model is opportunity cost. I am not going to waste my time for $10 per Q&A answer, because my opportunity cost is potentially $millions (for myself, and $billions for society) and I answer for other reasons that pertain to me attaining that $millions goal.

BitcoinNewsMagazine
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 966



View Profile WWW
April 08, 2016, 04:29:48 PM
 #18

While an interesting option a webmaster can always host affiliate banners him or her self and Adblockers can do nothing about it. Adsense and other networks can be blocked but self hosted banners cannot.

Doubtful. Task-specific AI has reached the point where I'd guess you could block ad banners of any source with >95% accuracy rate. If they are a standard size, which the nature of ad networks and mass distribution more or less requires, then it would easily approach 100%


Maybe in the future but not now. Added ADZCoin Savers extension to Chrome and neither it nor Brave browser is blocking my self hosted banners. Will worry about it when the time comes.

TPTB_need_war
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 420


View Profile
April 10, 2016, 01:55:21 AM
 #19

That was a thought provoking article, thanks! I agree with much of that analysis for small amounts as he suggested, but for larger amounts I'm not sure. I think we can break tipping into two groups - passive tipping, where you tip someone for content they already produced like a blog, and interactive tipping, where you tip someone for a response they give you. I think the 2nd type has much more potential to generate meaningful income

@TPTB, you for example, could open a Q&A thread for tech & other advice. An answer that takes you a few minutes to write *might* be worth thousands to the questioner. That type of thing would probably fall under 'tipping' but it's different to a fractional penny, and if it was easier to do it might take off.

Problem is that maybe only the person who asks tips you and the rest just decide you've already been paid. The problem with that model is opportunity cost. I am not going to waste my time for $10 per Q&A answer, because my opportunity cost is potentially $millions (for myself, and $billions for society) and I answer for other reasons that pertain to me attaining that $millions goal.

The tipping idea may work as a replacement for an up vote for site such as StackOverflow (StackExchange) where there is ongoing competition to see who can receive the highest ranking. Here you are competing not for the money but for the reputation, which makes it worth while.

boomboom
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 634



View Profile WWW
April 10, 2016, 02:35:02 AM
 #20

That was a thought provoking article, thanks! I agree with much of that analysis for small amounts as he suggested, but for larger amounts I'm not sure. I think we can break tipping into two groups - passive tipping, where you tip someone for content they already produced like a blog, and interactive tipping, where you tip someone for a response they give you. I think the 2nd type has much more potential to generate meaningful income

@TPTB, you for example, could open a Q&A thread for tech & other advice. An answer that takes you a few minutes to write *might* be worth thousands to the questioner. That type of thing would probably fall under 'tipping' but it's different to a fractional penny, and if it was easier to do it might take off.

Problem is that maybe only the person who asks tips you and the rest just decide you've already been paid. The problem with that model is opportunity cost. I am not going to waste my time for $10 per Q&A answer, because my opportunity cost is potentially $millions (for myself, and $billions for society) and I answer for other reasons that pertain to me attaining that $millions goal.

The tipping idea may work as a replacement for an up vote for site such as StackOverflow (StackExchange) where there is ongoing competition to see who can receive the highest ranking. Here you are competing not for the money but for the reputation, which makes it worth while.

I'm assuming you'd get other benefits from the Q&A, but there is an opportunity cost for you, and some free-riding from other readers. What I'm suggesting has a vibe closer to what a busking musician does. They're doing something for 'free' in public because they enjoy doing it, but getting paid is one of the goals. A good busker can make a living from it, and most are OK with some people not paying, but if nobody ever paid they'd probably do it far less, but still do it sometimes for the enjoyment factor and skill development.
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!