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Author Topic: [ANN][BITLANDGLOBAL]|ICO|Decentralized Land Registry  (Read 2845 times)
tabali tigi
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April 08, 2016, 11:47:38 PM
 #41

Received an email my rich uncle in Nigeria has left me money. Will transfer that money into the coin.

you got the nigerian serial scammer vibe too?
those guys are pros.. man FOR REAL.
ill watch this develop but not touching personally

Video Presentation

The whole "nigerian scam" thing is really old guys.  I guess get it out of your system now.  I am two months away from receiving my second M.S. with a focus in Cyber Security for enterprise scale organizations.  If you'd like to see some of what I've written, please take a look at my Academia page.  I have worked in Indiana University's fMRI lab, and have worked in machine learning in the past, so please excuse me if I can't find the humor in being called a Nigerian scammer.

Cheers!

Chris

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tabali tigi
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April 08, 2016, 11:52:23 PM
 #42

I will go ahead an post something I wrote in 2014:

How Can Cryptocurrency Move Forward?

"If there is one thing that almost everyone in the crypto world has in common, it is the loss of money through scams or larceny.

Whether it is a pump and dump, an attack on an exchange, or a long con, it has been nearly impossible to remain unscathed in the free market of the crypto economy. With new regulations on the horizon from the US government concerning tax laws, many crypto users are looking at the potential to have their currency taxed not only for the coming years, but also retroactively.

What has NOT been discussed, however, is any protection for cryptos. It seems governments want to take money from the crypto communities through taxation, but they want to leave us to fend for ourselves. Who can the crypto community trust to protect it from the scammers and thieves?

To better understand this dilemma, we should examine why “trust” is fundamentally at the basis of a functional community.

In social scientist Francis Fukuyama’s book, Trust: The Social Virtues and The Creation of Prosperity (1996), he presents the following argument: at the basis of every functional society, trust must exist, and even further the more trust a society has, the easier it is for that society to create prosperity.

To summarize, Fukuyama posits that a society with laws can function not just because of the laws, but because people trust the laws will be enforced, so things like ownership and legal contracts become possible because people invest their own trust in the system.

He makes the case that it’s easier to create a large consolidated firm in a place where there is more trust. He also mentions that in light of new technology, people would be able to connect on smaller scales and create firms that were not based around countries or local economies, but also functioned on the trust between individuals. In essence, it is the trust that allows firms to work as a unit towards the same goal.

While it’s not easy to accurately measure trust, it’s easy to see that trust in the crypto world is fading, and it is mainly due to the scammers and thieves, not because of the systems themselves.

Since the crypto world is largely based around anonymity, our first level of trust is gone. We don’t know the names or faces of people we are dealing with. Such a simple gesture goes a long way in establishing trust, but not many people in the crypto world want to take that first step.

Now that we know that many countries will not only tax crypto, but they will not actively protect them, another level of trust is gone, which would have been the legal system to protect this realm.

But the worst thing affecting trust now, is the thieves and scammers themselves. While these types are not unique to the crypto world, since this technology is so early in its inception, they have the potential to cause mass distrust in the crypto world and cause it to fall apart.

With the current state of the crypto economy, we are all faced with a choice. Do we retreat to what feels safe, and what we feel we can trust in the old legal system and old currency, or do we band together as individuals and force the thieves out on our own since the governments will not and cannot do it?

The crypto world is the Wild West. We have no Wyatt Earp, so we must all be the sherriff."

tuvok007
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April 09, 2016, 07:20:17 PM
 #43

It is like i feel a little bit of racism here.I believe in bitlandglobal project and Chris.Sadly but it seems that when a black man wants to present a great project he needs to work twice as hard if he wants people to trust him. Go Chris and Bitlandglobal project.some people will always be haters no matter what anyone do but also alot more people will be believers if you have quality project (and it looks like you have one and you have a lot of knowledge) !

tabali tigi
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April 09, 2016, 11:09:17 PM
 #44

It is like i feel a little bit of racism here.I believe in bitlandglobal project and Chris.Sadly but it seems that when a black man wants to present a great project he needs to work twice as hard if he wants people to trust him. Go Chris and Bitlandglobal project.some people will always be haters no matter what anyone do but also alot more people will be believers if you have quality project (and it looks like you have one and you have a lot of knowledge) !

Hello Tuvok,

Thanks for the kind words!  I appreciate the sentiment, and hopefully we will show people that we are here to get some major things accomplished.

Cheers!


Chris


tabali tigi
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April 10, 2016, 12:51:28 PM
 #45

I will continue to post my writings on digital currency in this thread so people don't have to scour the Internet searching for them.

Proto-Dynamism: Death Of The Middle Man

“In very few instances do people really know what they want, even when they say they do.”

While that quote may sound familiar, it is not the infamous quote by Steve Jobs often referenced to allude to the “product first, customer input second” attitude that is a major problem with the profiteering approach to trade.

As the eighth and final part of a series covering the American economy from The Gold Rush to the Crypto Rush, the freedom to expound on the historical trends and postulate on potential scenarios inherently has limitless potential, and simultaneously has the bias of the author as an inescapable lens through which events will be forecast.

In this case, an attempt to remain completely objective about events which have not yet occurred will be an exercise in futility, so we will focus on utopian outcomes with the acknowledgement that the author has a positive outlook for things to come.

The Middle Man
As the articles analyzed historic trends to try and draw parallels to modern times, one of the elements that can be demonstrably proven as a common characteristic of both eras is the prevalence of the “middle man”, which is defined as:

A trader who buys from producers and sells to retailers or consumers.

Historically, an intermediary was a way to either establish a third party trust system, and a way to generate income for a person or company with exclusive access to products or goods. While this system on its own works well, in tandem with the unpredictability of human behavior and greed, the process of using intermediaries between a user and a product has caused tremendous drains on the global economy.

One of the paragons of Keynesian theory, the Nike Corporation have repeatedly disregarded ethics in the name of profit.

While it is well known that Nike continues to use sweatshops to get products at the lowest possible cost to turn around and sell them at the highest possible returns, their lack of ethics does not seem to bother their customer base. This would seem to fly in the face of all things rational, but it’s the nature of the market. As many capitalism purists defend these practices in the name of the free market, those who study thermo-economics look at the practices of companies like Nike as a problem beyond ethics.

As the middle man continually drains capital, energy, and trust from an economy, they have the potential to bring entire systems to a screeching halt. Unfortunately, many executives who understand nothing but the principle of buy low, sell high do not understand long term planning or conservation of energy. Whether real estate bubbles, stock market bubbles, or Dutch Tulip bubbles, the “buy low, sell high” intermediaries have repeatedly entered markets and drained them of their economic energy just to move on to do the same to a new market.

Squeezing Out The Middle Man
As the cycle has repeated many times throughout history, consumers are finally getting access to new ways to avoid the middle man.

One of the biggest and best examples in recent history was when “Napster” was created to allow person to person file transfers, and thus began the downfall of the entire music distribution industry. While the fight against person to person file sharing was initially led by Lars Ulrich of Metallica, other musicians came out in favor of file sharing, and the band Radiohead even went on to release an album that allowed users to download an album for free or donate. Many years later, the effect of P2P file sharing on the “middle men” of music distribution is undeniable, as the record industry lost half of its sales over a decade.

What can be gleaned from the Napster phenomenon is that when centralized institutions face person to person alternatives, the centralized institution is usually made to look like the worse option. As central banks and credit card companies scramble to understand cryptocurrency and how they can try to control it, major developments in the decentralization of currency transfer have been happening.

As central banks rely more and more on government bailouts to exude their control over the commerce of “Keynesian-based” economies, governments that used the middle man approach are running out of funds as well, and cannot perpetuate the shell game. This is not only a good thing for consumers, it is the perfect storm of centralized debt and consumer lack of trust for centralization.

The consumers that have been exploited and drained of their economic energy by the centralized banking systems will not likely stay with these centuries old feudal systems when faced with a viable and accessible option. If capital is able to freely flow around the centralized systems, they will eventually have no capital to perpetuate themselves, as they fundamentally have no concept of producing anything valuable for society.

The Birth Of The Proto-Dynamo
With the advent of Decentralized Autonomous Organizations (DAOs), the entire process of turning an idea into a tangible item gets taken out of the hands of corporations, and the development becomes an intimate exchange between the crowd and the actual developers. When an idea is presented to the crowd, the ideas that the crowd deems fit get funded.

Kickstarter is one of the most well-known crowd funding sources for start-up projects; but as cryptocurrency takes off teams like Mastercoin, Swarm, and Counterparty have created systems that allow crowd-funding to take on the direct route cutting out the middle man. As these systems are improved upon to create “trustless” infrastructures where there are safeguards to prevent exploitation within a trade, viable options to centralized banking are closer to reality.

If one looks at the Crypto Rush objectively, there have been more technological developments within the past six months than there were for the previous three years. This is perfectly in line with the technology associated with the gold rush, as the first miners were able to easily make money with pick-axes and panhandling, but as the gold became scarce, hydraulic drills and tech more advanced tech became necessary to mine the ore.

Just the same with the influx of pyrite or “fool’s gold” following the gold rush, the “fool’s alts” have made an entire community jaded to the point of throwing out the word “scam” as if it were a common salutation. In the wild west of Cryptoland, the harsh realities of economic Darwinism coupled with the fantastic possibilities of thermo-economics have created a machine which I will call a “proto-dynamo”.

It is important to establish the “Proto-dynamo” as concept that represents an entirely new paradigm of economic infrastructure. The concept alludes to the “dynamo” which is a machine that uses opposing magnetic forces to efficiently produce/convert energy. The principle behind the dynamo is to use opposing forces within the same machine to get a consolidated output of energy. If the new paradigm of “protodynamism” can be represented by an electrical generator, the old paradigm of Keynesian theory can be represented by a meat grinder in which ten pounds of product goes in one side, and six ounces of tasteless sausage comes out the funnel possibly tainted with formaldehyde or some random pesticide that is unpronounceable.

Since this article is not simply meant to take cheap shots at Keynesian theory, we will continue to delve into the necessity of Proto-dynamism. As Marshall McLuhan predicted with his “global village” theory, the growth of mass media has quickly made information extremely accessible to the average individual. In tandem with an infrastructure that allows crowd-funding to bring ideas to fruition as fast as possible, progress of technology that is useful to society will be able to hit the most efficient point that has ever been recorded.

The Arab Spring has been an actual revolution fueled by technology and information sharing that would not have been possible without the ability to quickly share strings of 140 characters. With the ability to share information comes the ability to have shared experiences. What have been forecasted as digital tribes by Mcluhan are the logical extensions of a globe trying to break free of the archaic and imperialist paradigm of nation-states.

On one hand, the homogenization of the public forum allows a space for shared experience which can facilitate empathy. On the other hand, a globalized forum necessitates the coexistence of potentially opposed ideologies.

All that said, the perfect storm of a populace that has little trust for centralized authority and a newfound opportunity for decentralized systems is upon us. It is impossible to know what tomorrow brings, but if we look at history, we have likely the smartest generation of humans with the most access to capital and information. From where I am sitting, the future looks pretty awesome.

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April 10, 2016, 08:03:04 PM
 #46

From May 17, 2014

Return of the Jedi: Using the Force of Regulation

Editor’s Note: This article is called Return of the Jedi because it’s part of a series. If you’re okay with jumping in at the middle, by all means keep reading. But if you want it to make a little more sense, you might want to start at the beginning.

One of the major issues facing the Crypto Rush is the looming threat of regulation into obsolescence. As China and Russia threaten to ban Bitcoin, and the United States threatens to tax it into oblivion, the former free market is being shaken by the impending possibilities of government crackdowns.

While some cryptocurrency enthusiasts think regulation will ultimately be the death of cryptocurrency, some parts of the community believe some level of regulation is necessary to save the currencies from thieves and hackers with bad intentions.

One can look to history to get an example of the extreme sides of under-regulating, and conversely what happens when something is over-regulated. In one case, under-regulation led to the Great Depression and in another case over regulation led to the United States government effectively stealing gold from its citizens.

Following the Gold Rush, a speculators’ market emerged where gold was bought and sold in expectation of profits based on the rising demand and fading supply.

While many of these trades were legitimate, there were many con artists who passed off pyrite as gold, and plated metals like lead with a layer of gold to trick buyers into paying exorbitant prices for relatively worthless items. As more people were taken advantage of in schemes that extended beyond just selling fool’s gold, government intervention seemed to be the only resolution to protecting the citizens. To properly contextualize regulation surrounding the Gold Rush, we should briefly examine the regulation and deregulation that occurred before it.

Central banking was first established in America in 1790, but due to war and unforeseen economic distresses, it became insolvent, and new charters were made to establish a second central bank to try to salvage previous investments.

In the middle of the economic crises, the brief War of 1812 caused economic stresses on all sides and increased tensions between the Americans and the British. The war was heavily focused around the trade blockades Britain had put up around France, as the Americans and French established a diplomatic relationship with the Louisiana Purchase.

The disputes between Britain and France in turn affected the British and American relations. With British charters eventually being cut off, and post war debts mounting, the banking system in America fell apart, leaving the citizens to re-establish the localized economies that existed with colonial currencies. This would be a perfect storm for allowing the Gold Rush to emerge in a near free market so the economy could be re-established without too much regulation stifling the market.

Retrospectively, the period from 1800-1848 may be observed as a battle for resources. The American government annexed the oil rich Texas from The Republic of Mexico, and established American sovereignty in California following the conclusion of the Mexican-American War. Consequently, the influx of newly found capital from gold, and the subsequent discoveries of large oil reserves in Texas in 1894 was the perfect environment for giant corporate conglomerates to form unchecked by any governing body.

Leading up to the turn of the century, the railroad system began to make national trade much easier and became the backbone of the American economic infrastructure. In 1887 the Interstate Commerce Act established a means to regulate private corporations because of the railroad industry’s increased power through monopolization.

Initially this act was aimed directly at the railroad industry, but the act extended beyond just railroad companies. The Department of Commerce and Labor was formed in 1903 to prevent corporations from abusing their workers in the same vein as the 1887 act was meant to protect consumers and workers alike.

With the influx of new capital, and increased regulation on speculation, it was only a matter of time before this culture would spread into the banking system. As investment funds became heavily concentrated, the chances of massive gains increased, but so did the chances for devastating losses.

This speculative cycle nearly collapsed the economy in the Panic of 1907 following heavy stock market manipulation and a resulting bank run, but J.P. Morgan effectively united a group of banks and saved the failing economy from the lost capital drained by bad speculation, bad banking practices, and empty promises made by con artists posing as legitimate businesses.

In an attempt to re-establish a central banking authority and prevent another economic disaster, the Federal Reserve Act established a new system of banks that would hold assets in an attempt to ensure the country could have asset backed solvency.

This act would start a series of extremely polarized decisions by the federal government concerning involvement in private sector ventures. As the new central banking system began to establish itself alongside the stock market, rampant speculation and scam artists led to a bank run and market crash that thrust America into the Great Depression.

The federal government then passed the Glass Steagall Act to try and prevent large banking conglomerates from mixing commercial and investment banking. The point of this was to stop big corporations from conspiring to take advantage of large portions of the American economy, and by proxy the American government.

In further attempts to use federal authority to solve the economic crisis facing the nation, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal established an initiative to build a new infrastructure to be used by the citizens, protected from corporate takeover.

A hybrid entity called the Tennessee Valley Authority was created in 1933 that took the corporate investment structure in tandem with the aim of serving the citizens at large. This was supposed to be the first of many such organizations, but lobbying groups put a stop to it, moving the United States into an age of deregulation and consolidation of capital into corporate monopolies.
After completely outlawing the right to own or trade gold in value of excess of $100 with Executive order 6102, the Gold Reserve Act took the gold from US citizens and put it in a national reserve to theoretically prevent the economy from collapsing again. When the US government took the gold and subsequently fixed the price, they were able to raise the value of their assets to recover losses during the depression. But while the short term effects shored up losses, the long term effects would send the United States down a path toward legislation backed oligarchy and corporate conglomerates that took advantage of the deregulation and created a culture of crony capitalism.

As we move into the next chapters, we’ll see this cycle of consolidation, regulation, and deregulation repeat in the modern era, as the Glass Steagall act faced repeal, and the banks once again used consolidation of infrastructure to take hold over the American people.

We’ll look at how ethics started to become part of the public dialog, and how the corporate models were dependent upon ethics being ignored. As information has become more available, the consequences of unethical behaviors and practices have become more public, and we will see how the Crypto Rush has the potential to be one of the first global economic shifts that is rooted in ethical awareness, and the implications of such a worldwide movement based around the ideals of symbiotic existence, practical application of new technology, and mutually beneficial usage of resources.

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April 10, 2016, 09:20:42 PM
 #47

Thats all too advanced for us most simpletons in this altcoin section of bitcointalk forum. i am being sarcastic haha. Anyway it is nice when smart people visit us every now and then.It is nice to read your works and learn something.

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April 22, 2016, 08:31:44 AM
 #48

any updates?


     
     

     
     
tuvok007
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April 22, 2016, 02:31:24 PM
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any updates?

go to this topic  https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1434155.0

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